Author: voice_cd

Flight MH370 ended in Southern Indian Ocean: Malaysian PM   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2014-3-26 02:35:05 |Display all floors
It's a tragic that sad news will have to be spilled and many bitter pills to swallow for families of victims of MH370. The harsh reality bites.
No debris belonging to the MH370 being confirmed found and tested yet M'sian govt was bullish that they are damn right of the facts the plane had gone down in South Indian Ocean.
Was it a  way for the M'sain government to realise they have enough patience of the criticism and accusation these Chinese victim families in KL pounding on them for hidding the truth. Or M'sian government would not want or afraid the Chinese will protest or strike that could literally become an obsession for opposition parties in M'sia to reap the chance to grow the issues into a nationwide protest,  knowing that political issues in M'sia has always been a tricky one. Opposition party is trying to show the public how unprofessional the present govt handling of major crisis. Such factors are some consideration worth taking note......

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Post time 2014-3-26 03:33:12 |Display all floors
Ratfink Post time: 2014-3-25 03:13
While it's sad I'm surprised they have waiting this long.  They should have declared this after 72 ...

still dont understand with just the satellite data this time from the britain's Inmarsat they just concluded the search ended like that with no further investigation  
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Post time 2014-3-26 03:57:52 |Display all floors
youknowhat Post time: 2014-3-26 03:33
still dont understand with just the satellite data this time from the britain's Inmarsat they just ...

If you understand doppler shift and the analysis of the those "ping" signals received from the ACARS transponder, together with the last identified location, combined with the maximum fuel load, stated on-board fuel load and aircraft all-up weight (from the maintenance release documents & flight plans), they can make a very good estimate of whether there was any possibility of them reaching a landing field or not - obviously in this case, there was no possibility, thus a sea-ditching or crash was the only scenario.

IF there were survivors of the ditching and they were in life-rafts, the emergency beacons that are salt-water activated would have been picked up by satellite on the 406MHz emergency beacon recievers in any satellite passing over the general area.

Sea temperatures of 10 degrees Celcius, with severe winds and high seas that have been through that area would offer virtually no chance of survival after the time which has passed.

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Post time 2014-3-26 04:06:52 |Display all floors
RealMadrid1 Post time: 2014-3-25 14:57
If you understand doppler shift and the analysis of the those "ping" signals received from the ACA ...

we want to see hard evidence like debris not the gadget glitches not the $5000 compensation, not the SMS textin, not the satellite data...not anythin at tis time but hard solid piece of evidence  
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Post time 2014-3-26 04:24:49 |Display all floors
youknowhat Post time: 2014-3-26 04:06
we want to see hard evidence like debris not the gadget glitches not the $5000 compensation, not t ...

Then it is time for you to start swimming there and see what you can find....

Agree that the SMS texting was a bit off, the $5000 compensation may be all they are initially entitled to under the Warsaw Convention (which is printed in or with every ticket sold).

Also there is the issue that UNTIL the airline stated categorically that the aircraft had crashed and there were no survivors, NO insurance policy could be actioned or claimed against, hence leaving all the relatives & Next of Kin in a state of legal limbo.

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Post time 2014-3-26 04:54:32 |Display all floors
youknowhat Post time: 2014-3-26 04:06
we want to see hard evidence like debris not the gadget glitches not the $5000 compensation, not t ...

Well the debris such as will be left is going to be found at a depth of about 4000 meters. That is going to be a hell of a job to recover but there is recovery gear available and the technology to deal with it.
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Post time 2014-3-26 04:56:57 |Display all floors
youknowhat Post time: 2014-3-26 03:33
still dont understand with just the satellite data this time from the britain's Inmarsat they just ...

It's not ended, bad weather has put an end to the searching today. With luck they will continue tomorrow.

This is the guardian piece I mentioned earlier.



Analysis by the British satellite company Inmarsat and the UK's Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) was cited on Monday by the Malaysian prime minister as the source of information that has narrowed the location where the Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 may have crashed into the southern Indian Ocean to a corridor a couple of hundred miles wide.

The analysis follows fresh examination of eight satellite "pings" sent by the aircraft between 1.11am and 8.11am Malaysian time on Saturday 8 March, when it vanished from radar screens.

The prime minister, Najib Razak, said: "Based on their new analysis, Inmarsat and the AAIB have concluded that MH370 flew along the southern corridor, and that its last position was in the middle of the Indian Ocean, west of Perth.

"This is a remote location, far from any possible landing sites. It is therefore with deep sadness and regret that I must inform you that, according to this new data, flight MH370 ended in the southern Indian Ocean."

He added that they had used a "type of analysis never before used in an investigation of this sort".

The new method "gives the approximate direction of travel, plus or minus about 100 miles, to a track line", Chris McLaughlin, senior vice-president for external affairs at Inmarsat, told Sky News. "Unfortunately this is a 1990s satellite over the Indian Ocean that is not GPS-equipped. All we believe we can do is to say that we believe it is in this general location, but we cannot give you the final few feet and inches where it landed. It's not that sort of system."

McLaughlin told CNN that there was no further analysis possible of the data. "Sadly this is the limit. There's no global decision even after the Air France loss [in June 2009, where it took two years to recover the plane from the sea] to make direction and distance reporting compulsory. Ships have to log in every six hours; with aircraft travelling at 500 knots they would have to log in every 15 minutes. That could be done tomorrow but the mandate is not there globally."

Since the plane disappeared more than two weeks ago, many of the daily searches across vast tracts of the Indian Ocean for the aircraft have relied on Inmarsat information collated halfway across the world from a company that sits on London's "Silicon Roundabout", by Old Street tube station.

Using the data from just eight satellite "pings" after the plane's other onboard Acars automatic tracking system went off at 1.07am, the team at Inmarsat was initially able to calculate that it had either headed north towards the Asian land mass or south, towards the emptiest stretches of the India Ocean.

Inmarsat said that yesterday it had done new calculations on the limited data that it had received from the plane in order to come to its conclusion. McLaughlin told CNN that it was a "groundbreaking but traditional" piece of mathematics which was then checked by others in the space industry.

The company's system of satellites provide voice contact with air traffic control when planes are out of range of radar, which only covers about 10% of the Earth's surface, and beyond the reach of standard radio over oceans. It also offers automatic reporting of positions via plane transponders. It is possible to send route instructions directly to the cockpit over a form of text message relayed through the satellite.

Inmarsat was set up in 1979 by the International Maritime Organisation to help ships stay in touch with shore or call for emergency no matter where they were, has provided key satellite data about the last movements of MH370.

Even as the plane went off Malaysian air traffic control's radar on 8 March, Inmarsat's satellites were "pinging" it.

A team at the company began working on the directions the plane could have gone in, based on the responses. One pointed north; the other, south. But it took three days for the data to be officially passed on to the Malaysian authorities; apparently to prevent any more such delays, Inmarsat was officially made "technical adviser" to the AAIB in its investigation into MH370's disappearance.

Inmarsat's control room in London, like some of its other 60 locations worldwide, looks like a miniature version of Nasa: a huge screen displays the positions of its 11 geostationary satellites, and dozens of monitors control and correct their positions. A press on a key can cause the puff of a rocket on a communications satellite 22,236 miles away, nudging its orbit by a few inches this way or that.

More prosaically, Inmarsat's systems enable passengers to make calls from their seats and also to use Wi-Fi and connect to the internet while flying.

If the plane has its own "picocell" essentially a tiny mobile phone tower set up inside the plane then that can be linked to the satellite communications system and enable passengers to use their own mobile phones to make calls, which are routed through the satellite and back to earth.

After its creation, Inmarsat's maritime role rapidly expanded to providing connectivity for airlines, the media, oil and gas companies, mining and construction in remote areas, and governments.

Privatised at the end of the 1990s, it was floated on the stock market in 2004, and now focuses on providing services to four main areas: maritime, enterprise (focused on businesses including aviation), civil and military work for the US government, and civil and military work for other governments. The US is the largest government client, generating up to a fifth of its revenues of about £1bn annually. The firm employs about 1,600 staff.
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