Author: sunnylin01

Japan on the eve of WWII   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2013-12-14 13:36:04 |Display all floors

Japanese government officials bow as Tsuyoshi Inukai's hearse passes in 1932. A gunshot on May 15, 1932 terminated the Inukai Administration. A coup d'état led by young army officers removed the last civil official who dared to confront the military before the full start of the war. [Photo/Sina]

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Post time 2013-12-14 13:36:29 |Display all floors

The streets in Japan had a fake prosperous look in 1933. The wealth and market access Japan snatched from China helped lift Japan's economy. Japanese people in that era had a favorable impression of the invasion policies. [Photo/Sina]

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Post time 2013-12-14 13:36:54 |Display all floors

Railway workers in Osaka test a telephone in 1933. The economic recovery in Japan helped technology to prosper, at the cost of invading China. [Photo/Sina]

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Post time 2013-12-14 13:37:15 |Display all floors

Makoto Saito succeeds Tsuyoshi Inukai after Inukai was assassinated. Saito, a navy admiral-turned politician assumed power as a result of civil government's reconciliation to the military. Saito, who came from the more rational Imperial Navy, disagreed with the army's agression. But his prudence was flooded by the entire military's craze. [Photo/Sina]

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Post time 2013-12-14 13:37:34 |Display all floors

Production under Japanese control at the Gongchangling Iron Mine in 1934. Japanese staff working here earned 20 times more than Chinese miners. Iron was among the resources Japan stole from China in the 1930s. [Photo/Sina]

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Post time 2013-12-14 13:37:52 |Display all floors

South Manchuria Railway workers cheer on the Japanese invasion in 1934. These Chinese workers, who directly benefited from the invasion, seemed happier than the Japanese soldiers to see the invasion taking place. [Photo/Sina]

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Post time 2013-12-14 13:38:14 |Display all floors

Japanese spy officer Junnosuke Ida poses for photos on horseback in 1934. Ida was undercover in China to as a spy, under the alias Zhang Zongyuan. His sabotage severely damaged the anti-Japan resistance in northeast China. [Photo/Sina]

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