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Fake bomb detector conman jailed for 10 years [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2013-5-6 01:19:50 |Display all floors
This post was edited by broken_heart at 2013-5-6 03:00

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/201 ... ector-conman-jailed

Fake bomb detector conman jailed for 10 years

[size=1.333em]James McCormick, who sold more than £55m worth of fake detectors likely to have caused Iraqi deaths, jailed for 10 years



[size=1.166em]James McCormick arrives for sentencing at the Old Bailey in London after being found guilty of selling fake bomb detectors. Photograph: Facundo Arrizabalaga/EPA

A fraudster who sold more than £55m worth of fake bomb detectors toIraq and other security hot spots has been jailed for 10 years.

Jim McCormick, 57, was found guilty of three counts of fraud over the sale of bogus explosive and drug detection devices for as much as £10,000 each when they were based on £15 novelty golf ball finders.

At the Old Bailey in London on Thursday Mr Justice Hone handed down the maximum sentence for a crime he described as "a callous confidence trick". He said the case was the most serious of its kind he has known.

After the verdict, Iraqi exiles called for compensation from at least £7m in assets that are expected to be confiscated from the Somerset-based businessman.

"He destroyed Iraqi lives," said Nidhal Ailshbib, an Iraqi activist protesting outside the Old Bailey. "Thousands of Iraqi people are dead and handicapped."

Detectives called for groups or individuals who believe they have been victims of explosions that could have been prevented if the bogus bomb detectors worked to come forward.

The judge told McCormick as he sat impassive in the dock: "Your fraudulent conduct in selling so many useless devices for simply enormous profit promoted a false sense of security and in all probability materially contributed to causing death and injury to innocent individuals."

He described how McCormick sold, with a small number of agents, 7,000 devices under the ADE brand to the Iraqi government and other international agencies for prices ranging from $2,500 (£1,600) per unit to $30,000, when they cost less than $50.

"The device was useless, the profit outrageous and your culpability as a fraudster has to be placed in the highest category," he told McCormick, who now stands to have assets worth millions of pounds confiscated.

The judge said that in terms of culpability and harm, he could imagine no more serious case.

"Soldiers, police forces, border customs officers, hotel security staff and many others trusted their lives to the overpriced devices sold by you," he said.

One of the devices, which were said to be able to detect explosives. Photograph: SWNS.com

"Your profits were obscene, funding grand houses, a greedy, extravagant lifestyle and even a yacht. You have neither insight, shame or any sense of remorse."

Prior to sentencing, the court heard statements from British army officers that bomb blasts killing civilians in Baghdad occurred after truck bombs and other explosives had passed through checkpoints manned by security officers using the fake detectors.

In a statement read out by Richard Whitam QC, prosecuting, Brigadier Simon Marriner said: "The inescapable conclusion is that devices have been detonated after passing through checkpoints. Iraqi civilians have died as a result."

In mitigation, Jonathan Laidlaw QC, defending, denied any responsibility on McCormick's part for the attacks, "any amount of protective devices at checkpoints in Baghdad couldn't protect the people of Iraq from those who conduct the insurgency there".

Mr Justice Hone refused to accept that.

A confiscation hearing under the proceeds of crime act was set for May next year. Police have warned that the fake detectors remain in use on checkpoints even though they do not work.

It is alleged by an Iraqi whistleblower that McCormick paid millions of pounds in bribes to senior Iraqis to secure the deals. General Jihad al-Jabiri, who ran the Baghdad bomb squad, is in prison on corruption charges relating to the contracts.

McCormick claimed the gadgets could detect explosives at long range, deep underground, through lead-lined rooms and multiple buildings. In fact, their antennae, which appeared to be like car radio aerials, were not connected to any electronics and had no power source.

McCormick's first model, the ADE-101, was a re-badged golf ball finder that was described by its US maker as "a great novelty item that you should have fun with".

The antenna was "no more a radio antenna than a nine-inch nail", one scientist told the jury.


The guardian goes on to report further on the fake bomb detectors"


The 'magic' bomb detector that endangered lives all over the worldJim McCormick made millions of pounds with his detectors – and the UK government unwittingly provided respectability
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2013/apr/23/magic-bomb-detector-lives-risk





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Post time 2013-5-8 19:57:29 |Display all floors
"I'm just saying if you get ten(10) years for selling fake bomb detectors should you not get two for 'buying fake bomb detectors?'"

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Post time 2013-5-9 07:47:43 |Display all floors

wikipedia says this:  Bogus devices

The US Department of Justice warned in a National Institute of Justice publication, "Guide for the Selection of Commercial Explosives Detection Systems for Law Enforcement Applications (NIJ Guide 100-99)," about the ongoing trend of "Bogus" explosives detection equipment being sold to unsuspecting consumers. The report mentions by name the Quadro Tracker, an apparent dowsing rod with a freely pivoting radio antenna rod with no functioning internal components.
"...There is a rather large community of people around the world that believes in dowsing: the ancient practice of using forked sticks, swinging rods, and pendulums to look for underground water and other materials. These people believe that many types of materials can be located using a variety of dowsing methods. Dowsers claim that the dowsing device will respond to any buried anomalies, and years of practice are needed to use the device with discrimination (the ability to cause the device to respond to only those materials being sought). Modern dowsers have been developing various new methods to add discrimination to their devices. These new methods include molecular frequency discrimination (MFD) and harmonic induction discrimination (HID). MFD has taken the form of everything from placing a xerox copy of a Poloroid [sic] photograph of the desired material into the handle of the device, to using dowsing rods in conjunction with frequency generation electronics (function generators). None of these attempts to create devices that can detect specific materials such as explosives (or any materials for that matter) have been proven successful in controlled double-blind scientific tests. In fact, all testing of these inventions has shown these devices to perform no better than random chance...." [11]
A number of dowsing rod-style detection devices have been widely used in Iraq and Thailand, notably the ADE 651 and GT200, where they have been reported to have failed to detect bombs that have killed hundreds of people and injured thousands more.

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Post time 2013-5-9 08:00:26 |Display all floors


National Institute of Justice (USA) 1999

7. WARNING: DO NOT BUY BOGUS EXPLOSIVES
DETECTION EQUIPMENT
From time to time, there are new devices that enter the market. Most companies make reasonable
claims, and their products are based on solid scientific principles. Claims for some other devices
may seem unreasonable or may not appear to be based on solid scientific principles. An old
truism that continues to offer good advise is “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is not
true.” If there are any questions as to the validity of a device, caution should be used and
thorough research must be performed before a purchase is made. Money can be wasted and even
lives may be risked. Although there may be other types of nonoperational devices around,
dowsing devices for explosives detection have emerged during the past couple of years.
There is a rather large community of people around the world that believes in dowsing: the
ancient practice of using forked sticks, swinging rods, and pendulums to look for underground
water and other materials. These people believe that many types of materials can be located
using a variety of dowsing methods. Dowsers claim that the dowsing device will respond to any
buried anomalies, and years of practice are needed to use the device with discrimination (the
ability to cause the device to respond to only those materials being sought). Modern dowsers
have been developing various new methods to add discrimination to their devices. These new
methods include molecular frequency discrimination (MFD) and harmonic induction
discrimination (HID). MFD has taken the form of everything from placing a xerox copy of a
Poloroid photograph of the desired material into the handle of the device, to using dowsing rods
in conjunction with frequency generation electronics (function generators). None of these
attempts to create devices that can detect specific materials such as explosives (or any
materials for that matter) have been proven successful in controlled double-blind scientific
tests. In fact, all testing of these inventions has shown these devices to perform no better than
random chance.
Mostly these devices are used to locate water and now are used extensively by treasure hunters
looking for gold and silver. In recent years some makers of these dowsing devices have
attempted to cross over from treasure hunting to the areas of contraband detection, search and
rescue, and law enforcement. The Quadro Tracker is one notable example of this cross-over
attempt. This device was advertised as being a serious technology with a realistic sounding
description of how it worked (close examination showed serious errors in the scientific sounding
description). Fortunately, the National Institute of Justice investigated this company and stopped
the sale of this device for these purposes, but not before many law enforcement agencies and
school districts wasted public funds on the purchase of these devices.
Things to look for when dealing with “new technologies” that may well be a dowsing device are
words like molecular frequency discrimination, harmonic induction discrimination, and claims of
detecting small objects at large distances. Many of these devices require no power to operate
(most real technology requires power). Suspect any device that uses a swinging rod that is held
nearly level, pivots freely and “indicates” the material being sought by pointing at it. Any device
that uses a pendulum that swings in different shaped paths to indicate its response should also
arouse suspicion. Advertisements that feature several testimonials by “satisfied users,” and
statements about pending tests by scientific and regulatory agencies (but have just not happened
yet) may be indications that the device has not been proven to work. Statements that the device
must be held by a human to operate usually indicate dowsing devices. Statements that the device72
requires extensive training by the factory, the device is difficult to use, and not everyone can use
the device, are often made to allow the manufacturer a way of blaming the operator for the
device’s failure to work. Another often used diversion is that scientists and engineers cannot
understand the operation of the device or the device operates on principles that have been lost or
forgotten by the scientific community.
In general, any legitimate manufacturer of contraband detection equipment will eagerly seek
evaluation of their device’s performance by scientific and engineering laboratories. Any doubt
that a device is legitimate can quickly be dispelled by making a call to any of the known agencies
whose business it is to know about security-related technology.

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Post time 2013-5-9 19:24:10 |Display all floors
All this comes before the "Tony Awards".

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