Author: Laowai2?

Do Chinese people really care? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2013-3-21 10:05:24 |Display all floors
That's depending on which scenarios, some just capitalised on the good samaritans, should somethings went wrong. Many time someone is offering help, ending up become a vitim.

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Post time 2013-3-21 10:31:01 |Display all floors
Dragons8 Post time: 2013-3-21 10:05
That's depending on which scenarios, some just capitalised on the good samaritans, should somethings ...

Thanks for the alert...will you please share your experience or story that I can become victim? So that I can neutralized it if it happen to me.

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Post time 2013-3-25 00:58:51 |Display all floors
This post was edited by jiayangguizi8 at 2013-3-25 01:46

There have been several cases in the past where people have helped those in need of consideration, and have ended up being a culprit themselves.
Those who were in need exploited the judiciary system and accused the people who helped so that they could be rewarded with money. So, many people now fear helping others, in case they are wrongly accused.
The case that seems to repeat the most is the one where someone is knocked down by a vehicle, the driver flees the scene, someone comes to help and he/she gets accused by the victim in exchange of money.

For the anecdote, I had an accident two years ago when I took a curve and landed on the ground after hitting the duffel bag of a woman who was walking in the two-wheel lane instead of the adjacent pedestrian lane, which left me with a nasty chronic back pain. The woman and her friend were obviously migrant workers, so I didn't want to take action against her (there was no good samaritan who came to my rescue anyway!). So, I told her that from now on, she should be careful with where she chooses to walk on the street. She replied with a "this is China, we can walk on the two-wheel  lane if we want to!". And after suggesting that we both went to the police, she agreed to take the advice and hopefully avoid a future accident.

As for the people who are unwilling to help, it might also be an aftermath of the "first come first served" mentality during famine days, where people were only caring about their own survival.

Every time I have helped people under the eye of my local friends, they always told me that Chinese people would think that only a stupid person would do so, even if it's with something very banal.

Notice how people can sometimes get quite surprised or reply with a coarse "bu yong!" when you give a simple "xie xie" after they give you a service (taxi, cashier etc...). Also, notice how stories with simple acts of kindness that end up well often make the news and touch readers/viewers; meaning it's something uncommon.

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Post time 2013-3-27 08:34:15 |Display all floors
huaren2323 Post time: 2013-3-21 10:31
Thanks for the alert...will you please share your experience or story that I can become victim? So ...

Cases normally happened in villages. There is a case of a son who brought his sickly mother to see a doctor in a village, and doctors whether western or tradition Chinese trained, due to their compassionate profession, sorry to say not all doctors, must treat all patients regardless of their illness. You noticed some doctors turned away sick peoples, maybe due to not having proper diagnostic machines or medicines or specialising in certian illnesses or to uphold his reputation. Some hospitals even required up-front payment even before treatment or consultation.

The poor village doctor trying to do good deeds, trying to treat the sickly woman brought by his son, after being rejected by many doctors. Who knows, when the woman is time to depart to another realm, and even the best doctors and medicines also cannot help? Then the son blamed the doctor, saying he brought his sick mother into his clinic alive, but became "stiff"when leaving the clinic. He brought his own gangs from his village to create havoc and commotion in front of the clinic. The good doctor even paid for the funeral expenses.

Bravo to the doctor! Tremendous good deeds accumulated. Well, for the son of the deceased, he will be  receiving his judgement when his time is up.

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Post time 2013-3-27 08:34:27 |Display all floors
huaren2323 Post time: 2013-3-21 10:31
Thanks for the alert...will you please share your experience or story that I can become victim? So ...

Cases normally happened in villages. There is a case of a son who brought his sickly mother to see a doctor in a village, and doctors whether western or tradition Chinese trained, due to their compassionate profession, sorry to say not all doctors, must treat all patients regardless of their illness. You noticed some doctors turned away sick peoples, maybe due to not having proper diagnostic machines or medicines or specialising in certian illnesses or to uphold his reputation. Some hospitals even required up-front payment even before treatment or consultation.

The poor village doctor trying to do good deeds, trying to treat the sickly woman brought by his son, after being rejected by many doctors. Who knows, when the woman is time to depart to another realm, and even the best doctors and medicines also cannot help? Then the son blamed the doctor, saying he brought his sick mother into his clinic alive, but became "stiff"when leaving the clinic. He brought his own gangs from his village to create havoc and commotion in front of the clinic. The good doctor even paid for the funeral expenses.

Bravo to the doctor! Tremendous good deeds accumulated. Well, for the son of the deceased, he will be  receiving his judgement when his time is up.

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Post time 2013-3-27 08:42:34 |Display all floors
Dragons8 Post time: 2013-3-27 08:34
Cases normally happened in villages. There is a case of a son who brought his sickly mother to see ...

OH..Oh....yes....village bullying... Thank you...I know what to do next time...

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