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Singh: India not planning further emission cuts [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2013-2-24 18:54:28 |Display all floors
This post was edited by sansukong at 2013-2-24 18:31

Singh: India not planning further emission cuts

Last updated on 5 February 2013, 6:12 pm

By Ed King                                                                                                                                                                                                        


India’s Prime Minster says developed countries are primarily responsible for addressing climate change, arguing his government has taken sufficient steps to promote low carbon growth. Speaking at the Delhi Sustainable Development Summit Dr Manmohan Singh said there could be “no progress” on avoiding the 2C target without further ambition from richer countries.“Our country is committed to meeting its domestic mitigation goal of reducing the emissions intensity of our GDP by 20-25 percent by year 2020 compared with 2005 levels,” he said.

“We have already taken several major steps on the path of low carbon growth. Now is the time for the richer industrialized countries to show that they too are willing to move decisively along this  path.”



Delhi_smog_466.jpg

                                                                                                                                                                           

30 people were injured last week in a 20-vehicle crash outside Delhi caused by dense fog (Pic: IBN/CNN)


Singh added that any global climate deal agreed at the UN talks should recognise India’s status as a developing country.

“They should form the bedrock of future arrangements post-2020 and we should ensure that the development aspirations and poverty reduction efforts of the developing countries are not constrained,” he said.

“The adoption of a second commitment period till 2020 under the Kyoto Protocol for emissions reductions by the industrialized world is also a welcome development. But, real progress cannot be achieved if developed countries are not willing to enhance their ambition levels.”

India is the world’s third largest emitter of greenhouse gases – behind China and the USA – and the vast majority of long term projections see the country’s emission levels rising steadily in the coming decades.The government says it is addressing the issue with its 2008 National Action Plan on Climate Change, but a rising middle class and the need to provide power to the 44% of the population who have no access to electricity indicate the scale of the challenge. Rising levels of coal consumption are a particular concern, with 455 power plants in the pipeline.

An IEA update last year predicts that India will be the largest seaborne coal importer by 2017 and the second-largest coal consumer, overtaking the USA.

Choking cities While the government shows little sign of ditching fossil fuels, public pressure could in time encourage it to adopt a new strategy.

Pollution levels from fossil fuels are soaring in all of India’s cities. In the last week Delhi has again been hit by a dense smog, leading to cancelled flights and a fatal crash involving 20 cars.

A study released at the World Economic Forum in Davos reported the country has the worst air quality on the planet. Levels of particulates called PM 2.5 are nearly five times the level where they become unsafe for humans.

The report warns: “They burrow deep into the vulnerable tissues of the lung, where whatever radioactive particles or heavy metals they brought with them can wreck havoc on easily damaged soft tissue.”Currently renewables such as wind, geothermal, solar, and hydroelectricity represent a 2% share of the Indian fuel mix. The government is exploring further hydropower options in the Himalaya.


RELATED VIDEO: Greenpeace India chief calls on PM Singh to stop environmentally damaging mining operations in sensitive areas













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Post time 2013-2-24 19:37:37 |Display all floors
So now rat has found India to blame?

So Americans can have their XL pipelines?
I've made my living, Mr. Thompson, in large part as a gambler. Some days I make twenty bets, some days I make none. There are weeks, sometimes months, in fact, when I don't make any bet at all because ...

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Post time 2013-2-24 20:47:00 |Display all floors

RE: Singh: India not planning further emission cuts

COMMENT: Is India the new China?

Last updated on 13 February 2012, 3:19 pm

By John Parnell
RTCC in Durban

India's Prime Minister Manmohan Singh with China's President Hu Jintao. (Source: Wikimedia/Jose Cruz/ABr)


The number of statistics about China bandied around by opponents of climate action is astounding in its own right.

Depending on who you talk to the country is opening a new coal power plant every month, every week, every month. As the country’s middle classes swelled, so too did its emissions. In the past the country has fiercely protected its right to this development and it’s record of cooperation during the UNFCCC process is far from unblemished.

Then last week from nowhere, lead negotiator Su Wei said that the country wanted to talk with the EU about the possibility of taking on an obligation to cut emissions.

With the US stating repeatedly that it will not sign-up to any commitment without all the other major emitters, all eyes turned to India.

But how fair is it to treat the two countries the same in the context of the negotiations.

“India is not a major emitter. It just happens to be a very large country,” says JM Mauskar, special secretary with the Indian Ministry of Environment. “India has a very low carbon footprint and it remains a very poor country.”

This is no sob story. The numbers back him up. China’s CO2 emissions per head of population are almost three times higher than India’s. While China’s are comparable to Sweden and Portugal, India’s are akin to those of Honduras, Namibia and Gabon. India has 400 million people living without electricity, China has around 70 million. You get the idea.

The Indian GDP per capita is almost identical to that of Africa’s. No one is expecting all of Africa to match China’s commitments. Perhaps if India negotiated in 30 discrete blocks things would be different. As it stands, it represents a lot of carbon dioxide emissions, in one neat and tidy delegation.

“You can’t compare China and India,” says Kartikeya Singh, CIERP Junior Associate at the Fletcher School who is also serving as an advisor to government delegations in Durban. “It’s convenient to compare them side-by-side because of their mammoth populations but the reality from an energy and emissions perspective, is quite different. They have fast growing economies too and all of these indicators make people want to put them together in a club.”

Both also suffer from an assumption that they are both doing very little about climate change. A myth that is perpetuated by the “coal plant” statistic.

“China is doing jaw-dropping emissions reduction work, they have made

huge cuts by shutting down many polluting industries and putting in

place policies to advance their “scientific” approach to development. Neither India or China are good at communicating what they are doing,” says Singh.

The US, many other people’s nominees for the climate enemy number one, is in a similar situation. While its progress in multi-lateral international talks has been fairly stagnant, there is plenty of action in the US as well.

“The world is being held hostage by US congress. The US can’t look for a federal solution. They are going to have to look at the local level. If you’re an Annex I country you’re damned if you do and you’re damned if you don’t.”

In the US, climate change is not viewed by as a major voting issue by the vast majority of the electorate. In India, as more time progresses, we can expect voters to demand more and more action from their government. Climate change is not about faraway islands dipping below sea level or notional warming evidenced only by scientific data sets. It’s about survival.

“People in India understand environmental sustainability is important. Climate change is not viewed in the traditional way that it is in the West. It’s more about water resources and electricity access for example. It’s about what people see on the ground on a daily basis. Which brings you back to development. As a voting issue it doesn’t just come down to climate change,” says Singh.

At the moment, India is certainly not the new China, but it is heir to the throne. It has a unique opportunity to continue its development and build green economy simultaneously. As that continues, expect its stance at the COP to evolve just as China’s has.




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Post time 2013-2-24 22:54:30 |Display all floors
Does that mean rat no need  to bother?
I've made my living, Mr. Thompson, in large part as a gambler. Some days I make twenty bets, some days I make none. There are weeks, sometimes months, in fact, when I don't make any bet at all because ...

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Post time 2013-2-26 00:53:08 |Display all floors

RE: Singh: India not planning further emission cuts

India says:

“We have already taken several major steps on the path of low carbon growth. Now is the time for the richer industrialized countries to show that they too are willing to move decisively along this  path.”

Meanwhile ...........

“China is doing jaw-dropping emissions reduction work, they have made huge cuts by shutting down many polluting industries and putting in place policies to advance their “scientific”
approach to development.

While in the U.S. of A.  .........

US President Barack Obama has already said he will only take actions that will boost US jobs: “if the message is somehow we’re going to ignore jobs and growth simply to address climate change, I don’t think anybody’s going to go for that. I won’t go for that,” he said.

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Post time 2013-2-26 01:04:17 |Display all floors
This post was edited by Revolutionar at 2013-2-26 01:06
sansukong Post time: 2013-2-26 00:53
India says:


and so?


Rats no need to bother?
Rats just want a free ride?

where got like that one?



now rats want to blame India and China so rats in America no need to do any thing.
I've made my living, Mr. Thompson, in large part as a gambler. Some days I make twenty bets, some days I make none. There are weeks, sometimes months, in fact, when I don't make any bet at all because ...

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Post time 2013-2-26 01:19:19 |Display all floors
sansukong Post time: 2013-2-26 00:53
India says:

ALL YOUR CUT AND PASTE JOBS FROM AMERICAN LOBBY GROUPS .........


DOES IT MAKE YOU LOOK SMART AND SEXY?

THAT WHY YOU DO IT?

YOU WANT TO LOOK SMART AND SEXY?
I've made my living, Mr. Thompson, in large part as a gambler. Some days I make twenty bets, some days I make none. There are weeks, sometimes months, in fact, when I don't make any bet at all because ...

Use magic tools Report

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