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Shameless Dalai Lama shows no mercy to his followers   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2013-1-1 15:18:57 |Display all floors
According to the media reports, there have been 90 suicidal cases by self-immolation between February 2009 and December 2012 among the Tibetan population. While lamenting over the loss of innocent lives, we have to ponder what’s behind the bloody self-immolations.

Rather than condemning and calling for an end to the suicidal acts that deviate from the tenets of Tibetan Buddhism, the 14th Dalai Lama and his supporters glorify those who self immolate and regard them as heroes. So if self-immolation is a good thing, why don't Dalai and his clique set themselves on fire for their goal of an “independent Tibet”? In fact, the lives of ordinary Tibetans, which are deemed of no value, have been shamelessly taken advantage of by Dalai and his clique to distain China and achieve their political goals. He doesn’t really have the best inertest of Tibetans at heart. He’s put his own interest above those of other Tibetans.

Ample evidence shows that the Dalai Lama has been the organizer behind the self-immolation incidents. Lorang Konchok, a 40-year-old monk at the Kirti Monastery in the Aba Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan, confessed their role in inciting a series of self-immolations in Tibetan areas aided by the Dalai group. He has goaded eight people into setting themselves on fire since 2009 and three of them died. At the requests of the "media liaison team," Konchok took advantage of his position and influence in the monastery and often encouraged others to commit self-immolations, telling local monks and followers that self-immolation was not against Buddhist doctrines and those who did it were "heroes."

Dalai’s ploy to use one of the most inhuman acts for his political goals, which should be condemned all over the world, is doomed to failure.


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Post time 2013-1-2 16:02:40 |Display all floors
Dalai's Shangri-la was the Tibetans' living hell
Torture museum in Lhasa
This is a photograph from the Torture musuem in Lhasa. It maintains an exhibit of instruments that were used to punish Tibetans during the Dalai Lamas' rule. At the forefront is an instrument for crushing fingers. Also shown are various whips and tools for gouging out eyes.
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Post time 2013-1-2 16:06:54 |Display all floors
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A young Tibetan whose eyes were gouged outThis photograph shows a Tibetan whose eyes were gouged out with the kinds of instruments that were used for this kind of punishment.
Anna Louise Strong describes torture implements she saw when visiting Tibet in 1959:
"There were handcuffs of many sizes, including small ones for small children; there were instruments for cutting off noses and ears, and other instruments for breaking off the hands. There were instruments for gouging out eyes, including a special stone cap with two holes in it that was pressed down over the head so that the eyes bulged out through the hole, in which position they were gouged out and hot oil poured in into the sockets."

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Post time 2013-1-2 16:08:39 |Display all floors
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Tibetan with severed achilles tendon
This photograph shows bKra-shis, a herdsman, whose foot tendons were taken out as punishment.
Anna Louise Strong describes the torture instruments she saw in Tibet in 1959:
"There were instruments for slicing off knee-caps, after which boiling oil was applied there. other instruments sliced off the heels or hamstrung men, making permanent cripples. there were instruments for sealing the forehead with a red hot brand. there were various kinds of whips for flogging, with wooden paddles, or with ropes or wires. there were special instruments for dis-embowelling."

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Post time 2013-1-2 16:09:57 |Display all floors
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Tibetans in leg irons
A common punishment in Tibet was to shackle people's legs.

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Post time 2013-1-2 16:12:06 |Display all floors
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Tibetan lama orders blindingStuart and Roma Gelder met Tsereh Wang Tuei in Tibet in 1962. He told them his story:
"Without emotion he told us that he was born a serf of Drepung in the village of Peichang, on the edge of the grasslands where we met him. He became a herdsman, looking after sheep and yaks. when he was twenty years old he stole two sheep belonging to a petty official of the monastery, named Gambo. For this crime he was taken before the monastic magistrate who ordered that both his eyes should be put out.
Tsereh Wang Tuei drew his hand across his face as he described how one was gouged with a knife and the other sucked from its socket with a half-hollowed ball. Then adding a little private punishment of his own, Gambo instructed the 'executioner' to tie up Tsereh's left hand with rope and twist and pull it until parts of two fingers came off. To complete the torture, the bleeding hand was wrapped in salted yak hide. When the leather had shrunk it was permitted to be removed. What was left was a useless piece of flesh and crushed bone.
we asked Tsereh Wang Tuei, 'Are you a Buddhist?'
'I was,' he said.
'But not now?'
'No,' he replied. 'When a holy lama told them to blind me I thought there was no good in religion.'"

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Post time 2013-1-2 16:13:50 |Display all floors
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Mutilation in old TibetIn her book, Tibetan Interviews, Anna Lousie Strong, recounts:
"A herdsman, speaking at the big mass meeting with arms uplifted to show that the hands were long since broken off at the wrist. But the strong face spoke now neither of pain nor of horror but only of judgement as the man said: "This lord took away my wife and I never again saw her. He beat off my hands when I opposed him. He also beat of the hands of my younger brother, who was weaker than I and who died of shock and loss of blood. My sister died of the terror. My old mother is ill ever since."

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