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Was Industrial Sabotage at Play with Super Jet crash in Indonesia?   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2012-5-15 16:50:33 |Display all floors

The United States is capable of sabotaging any aviation competition posed by
the Russian civil aviation.

As such, it is imperative that the United States be prevented from similar sabotage
of the Chinese civil aviation plans.

The US will do anything, including mass murders to retard both the Russian and the Chinese
endeavours to promote their respective civil aviation plans. Such is the evil and vile scheme
of the United States.

So China, BEWARE!

                  ------------------------------------//--------------------------------



Was Industrial Sabotage at Play with Super Jet crash in Indonesia?

Wayne MADSEN | 12.05.2012 | 07:26


Based on past aggressive competitive commercial tactics employed by the alliance of American corporations, the U.S. Intelligence Community, and the Pentagon, aviation experts in Asia are wondering aloud whether the recent crash of the new Sukhoi Super Jet 100 in Indonesia was the result of high-stakes industrial sabotage engineered to protect Boeing’s lucrative commercial and military aviation market in Asia at the expense of a resurgent Russian aviation industry…

The Sukhoi passenger plane was carrying prospective Indonesian customers, as well as journalists and employees of the Sukhoi company, when it crashed into the summit of Mount Salak, near Jakarta. Of the some 50 passengers and crew, there were no survivors of the crash. A reliable Indonesian journalist has confided that the only copy of the passenger manifest was on board the aircraft when it crashed. Other than the Sukhoi crew and officials on board, there were a number of representatives of Indonesian airlines, as well as local journalists, as well as nationals of France, Italy, and the United States.

After 21 minutes into the demonstration flight, the pilot requested air traffic control permission to drop from 10,000 to 6,000 feet. Although there was light rain, weather conditions were not hazardous. The reason for the pilot's request to descend is not known. Shortly after the plane descended, air traffic control lost contact with the plane. Ground observers reported that the plane appeared "unsteady" before the crash. The plane did not take off from Sukarno-Hatta International Airport but from another local airfield, the Halim Perdanakusuma Airport, which is shared with the Indonesian Air Force’s Halim Air Force Base.

Halim is where U.S. Special Forces troops have been training their Indonesian counterparts in various air force tactics, possibly including meaconing, intrusion, jamming, and interference (MIJI) electronic warfare tactics designed to interfere with aircraft navigation systems. Some of the training occurs every year as part of the EXERCISE COPE WEST, sponsored the Commander of the U.S. Pacific Command in Hawaii. Last year's exercise, COPE WEST 10, concentrated on simulated military operations against the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force, which uses fighter jets designed and licensed by Sukhoi, including the Sukhoi 27 and Sukhoi 30.

The Sukhoi carried a price tag much lower than its Boeing counterparts, $35 million each, and was Russia's first commercial aircraft offering since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Three new Indonesian airlines, Kartika Airlines, Sky Aviation, and Queen Air, had already placed orders for 48 SuperJets and there were another 170 orders from around the world. The crash of the SuperJet has placed the viability and attractiveness of the aircraft for current and future customers in doubt.

On his last visit to Indonesia, President Obama inked a deal with Indonesia's Lion Air to sell 230 Boeing aircraft with a $22 billion loan guarantee from the U.S. Export-Bank (EX-IM Bank). Obama said the deal to supply Boeing aircraft to Lion Air would create 110,000 U.S. jobs. However, Sukhoi's entrance into the lucrative Indonesian commercial aviation market, which now has a number of competitors to the partly state-owned and safety record-plagued Garuda Indonesian Airlines, represented a threat to Boeing's business in the country and the Boeing deal worked out by Obama.

Lion Air is owned by brothers who are former travel agents, Kusana and Rusdi Kirana. The airline's poor safety record has earned it a ban by the European Union for its poor maintenance record and lack of corporate transparency and some of its pilots have been implicated in drug smuggling. A February 15, 2012 Reuters report concerning the biennial Singapore Air Show, which Rusdi attended, states that very little is known about the Kirana brothers, other than the fact that Kirana is also a former Brother typewriter salesman. The brothers started Lion Air a little over ten years ago.

The Singapore Air Show was attended by Boeing Southeast Asia President Ralph "Skip" Boyce, who was pushing commercial offerings, including the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, the Boeing 737-MAX, and the Boeing 747-8 Intercontinental, as well as military aircraft, such as the KC-135R Stratotanker and the F-15 fighter. Boyce is a former U.S. ambassador to Indonesia and Thailand and Deputy Chief of Mission in Singapore. Boyce was criticized by the opposition in Thailand for opposing the anti-government “Red Shirts” during that nation’s military rule. However, Boyce’s contacts inside Thailand’s government and business establishment enabled him to secure an order for 77 Boeing aircraft by Thai International Airways. Boyce was also criticized by some in the Indonesia press for allegedly covering up details of the 2002 terrorist bombing in Bali that killed a number of Indonesian nationals and foreign tourists.

The entry of Sukhoi into the lucrative Asian market with the lower-cost SuperJet was obviously seen by Boeing as a threat to its business in the region. It also helps Boeing that Obama secured the EX-IM Bank loan guarantee for Lion Air to purchase Boeing aircraft.

In addition, Lion Air's failure to introduce its Initial Public Offerring (IPO) of $1 billion in stock, due to the global financial meltdown has placed the airline in financial jeopardy. Its main competitor, Garuda, has also delayed its stock float, causing a major ripple in the Indonesian aviation market. There is a distinct possibility that without Obama’s loan guarantees on the Boeing deal, Lion Air could have been forced into bankruptcy.

America does not hesitate employing industrial sabotage against its competitors, especially when it comes to Asia.

In unprecedented “car wars” with Japan, the Obama administration did not hesitate to engage in industrial sabotage against Japan through a pre-planned operation directed against the Japanese automobile manufacturer Toyota. In 2010, Obama’s Republican Transportation Secretary, Ray LaHood, engaged in a bitter campaign against Toyota over problems with certain accelerator pedals that were not even manufactured by Toyota but by the Indiana-based firm CTS (formerly known as Chicago Telephone Supply).

LaHood kicked off America’s anti-Toyota campaign by stating that all Toyota owners should stop driving their vehicles and return them to the dealership for a fix. To the delight of then-financially troubled General Motors and Ford, LaHood painted a wide brush in his comments about Toyotas. The problem affected only a small fraction of Toyota vehicles that had a U.S.-manufactured accelerator pedal. The accelerator issue resulted in a voluntary recall of millions of Toyota vehicles, including the popular Camry and Corolla, by the Japanese auto giant.

LaHood was implementing a White House operation to grab a major portion of Toyota’s market share and hand it over the General Motors and Ford. The Obama administration, through its bailout of GM, became a virtual auto company and decided to play economic hardball with Japan, just as it is doing now with Russia on behalf of Boeing.      

Obama’s predecessors in the White House have not shirked from engaging in industrial espionage to boost America’s market share. In 1995, President Bill Clinton authorized the National Security Agency (NSA) to spy on companies like Toyota and Nissan during U.S. trade negotiations with Tokyo over Japanese luxury car imports to the United States. George H. W. Bush also used NSA to eavesdrop on Indonesia during negotiations between the then-government of President Suharto and Japan’s NEC on a major multi-million dollar telecommunications contract. Bush shared the intelligence with AT&T, a competitor of NEC on the Indonesian contract. Under pressure from Washington, Jakarta decided to evenly split the contract between NEC and AT&T.

A former member of the U.S. Congress confided that he was never satisfied with the explanation of the sudden death in February 2010 of his friend and the powerful chairman of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, Representative John Murtha of Pennsylvania, from an infection after routine gall bladder surgery at Bethesda Naval Hospital in Washington, DC. Murtha was an influential player in the award of a $35 billion competition between Boeing and European Aeronautic Defense and Space (EADS) to supply the U.S. Air Force with military versions of either Boeing or Airbus aircraft to serve as in-flight refueling tankers. Murtha was replaced as chairman by Representative Norman Dicks of Washington state, who was known as the “Congressman from Boeing.” A year after Murtha’s death, Boeing received the Air Force contract.

When it comes to sabotage and espionage, the ability of the United States to go to great lengths, including murder, should never be underestimated. The sordid record speaks for itself.

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Post time 2012-5-15 19:57:47 |Display all floors
Accidents happen. Learn from them and soon enough you will be making good and reliable aircrafts. Blame it on nutty conspiracy theories and you will never improve anything. The company will naturally discard this as nonsense and move on to improving their aircrafts.

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Post time 2012-5-15 20:16:59 |Display all floors
Kbay Post time: 2012-5-15 19:45
Excellent article Laoda1!

This piece should be awarded the 'Original' crediting from Voice.

It's not an original, it is a copy paste from another article, he even quotes the source.
Spreading magic around the world since 2007.

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Post time 2012-5-15 20:37:52 |Display all floors
This post was edited by SMITHI at 2012-5-15 20:40
pantarhei Post time: 2012-5-15 19:57
Accidents happen. Learn from them and soon enough you will be making good and reliable aircrafts. Bl ...


Accidents do not happen this way, this is well tested plane at this stage(4 years since first is build).

sabotage is more than obvious and Amerikkkkkkkkka is more than likely behind it.

CIA very rarely leave postcard behind, i doubt that truth will ever see the light.

this could be clue:

US sanctionsOn August 4, 2006, the US State Department imposed sanctions on Sukhoi for allegedly supplying Iran in violation of the United States Iran Nonproliferation Act of 2000. Sukhoi was prohibited from doing business with the United States Federal Government.[5] In November 2006, the US State Department reversed its sanctions against Sukhoi.[6]

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Post time 2012-5-15 20:41:58 |Display all floors
Kbay Post time: 2012-5-15 20:21
Your fake gweilo 'Panda' name is not original either, but you still got a pat from the dull Voice! ...

you speak truth Kboy

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Post time 2012-5-15 20:50:09 |Display all floors
This post was edited by pantarhei at 2012-5-15 20:50
SMITHI Post time: 2012-5-15 20:37
Accidents do not happen this way, this is well tested plane at this stage(4 years since first is b ...

There are planes that are tested far more than this one. They also crash. Then you investigate, you learn what is wrong and you fix it.

Blaming it on ridiculous sabotage theories is the irresponsible route and will tarnish the reputation of the company far more than the crash itself. You may be thick as brick but even you must see how counterproductive it would be for the company to play that card.

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Post time 2012-5-15 21:09:13 |Display all floors
Kbay Post time: 2012-5-15 20:57
The author of this piece, Wyane Madsen sound Anglo, and an aviation expert to me.
Why dismiss diff ...

What does it matter where author is from? My argument is simple. The company tries to become a player on international markets. It has a crash. Blaming it on sabotage would be perceived as irresponsible. Be perceived as irresponsible would be highly damaging in a market where safety one of , if not the, biggest concerns.

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