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Himalyan Glaciers Getting Bigger is a Mystery? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2012-4-17 04:08:54 |Display all floors
This post was edited by sansukong at 2012-4-17 16:22

04/16/2012 · 11:35 AM


Himalyan Glaciers Getting Bigger is a Mystery?

Here’s the headline in the Christian Science


Monitor….Global warming mystery: Some Himalayan glaciers getting bigger

While the story comes from Reuters, you have to laugh at their lead in…

The Himalayan glaciers are the planet’s largest bodies of ice outside the polar caps. New research shows some Himalayan glaciers got bigger between 1999-2008

To this we say “no ---- Sherlock!” If you look at the below charts you can see that the average rise in temperature starts to flatten out (the curving dash line) and see the start of the downward trend, which prompts us to ask what global warming?               

Want more on why this shouldn’t be a big mystery? Look at the arctic ice so far this year. Note the red line (2012) where it meets or slightly exceeds the average from 1979 to 2006, and meets 2010. Again we ask  what warming?    


                                                                                       



The mystery here is why they don’t update the average and instead of 1979 to 2006 make it 1979 to 2012? That’s a 6 year lag!You can look at the Antarctic below, too. Note there’s nothing to write home to mama about here, either. To be redundant what warming?

Note the average here is 1979-2008, a little better but still not current in our book. With all the computers and satellites these days we have to again ask why the averages are not more current? 2008 is still a 4 year lag in information. They still using Commodore 64′s or what?To reiterate, the mysteries to us are and what you should be asking yourselves is:


1. Why the chart average dates aren’t more current? Why do the averages cut off years before now?


2. Why anyone should be surprised that some of the glaciers aren’t melting like some phony computer models show?


3. Why some scientists appear to think the general public is dumber than a rock and continue to foist BS upon us even though it appears there’s no evidence of any catastrophic or unprecedented anything.


Really now, the CO2 is going up and the temperature isn’t, the glaciers aren’t melting and it doesn’t appear the Arctic or Antarctic sea-ice is disappearing either. That should be about all you need to know to comprehend there’s not much of a problem. Yet, we continue to be deluged with heaping, steaming, piles of crap that regardless the weather, claim global warming is unprecedented and that unless we start redistributing the world’s wealth, we’re all gonna die.


Source: The Christian Science Monitor













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Post time 2012-4-17 15:21:04 |Display all floors
Himalyan Glaciers Getting Bigger is a Mystery?

The wild yak grazes on grasses, herbs and lichens and the increasing populations of wild yak, their farts are creating a
methane hungry environment since their farts are free  of greenhouse gas emissions...

Australia's cow farts are responsible for 15% greenhouse gas emissions...
while kangaroo farts are methane free...


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It takes about 40 muscles to smile, but only 4 to pull the trigger of a decent rifle

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Post time 2012-4-17 16:18:26 |Display all floors
This post was edited by correction at 2012-4-17 16:20

I've read somewhere that it is the Karakoram glaciers that are getting bigger, not Himalayan glaciers,
in fact Himalayan glaciers are shrinking fast just like the rest of the world's glaciers.
A significant part, 28-50% of the Karakoram Range is glaciated, compared to the Himalaya (8-12%), but unlike in the Himalayas, many Karakoram glaciers are covered in a layer of rubble which has insulated the ice from the warmth of the sun. Where there is no such insulation, the rate of retreat is high.

Please don't shoot, I'm just a babe.

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Post time 2012-4-17 16:45:45 |Display all floors
Anti global warming, pro oil industry nonsense.

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Post time 2012-4-17 18:39:53 |Display all floors

RE: Himalyan Glaciers Getting Bigger is a Mystery?

This post was edited by sansukong at 2012-4-17 18:44

15 April 2012 Last updated at 13:35 ET

      By Richard Black Environment correspondent, BBC News




Some Asian glaciers 'putting on mass'




Some glaciers on Asia's Karakoram mountains are defying the global trend and getting thicker, say researchers.
A French team used satellite data to show that glaciers in part of the Karakoram range, to the west of the Himalayan region, are putting on mass.
The reason is unclear, as glaciers in other parts of the Himalayas are losing mass - which also is the global trend.
The region's glaciers are poorly studied, yet provide a vital water source for more than a billion people.
The response of Himalayan glaciers to global warming has been a hot topic ever since the 2007 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which contained the erroneous claim that ice from most of the region could disappear by 2035.
Although often regarded as part of the Himalayas, the Karakoram range is technically a separate chain that includes K2, the world's second-highest peak.
Much of the region is inaccessible, and there has been a general recognition that observations need to be stepped up in order to clarify what is going on.

Continue reading the main story

“Start QuoteIt could be due to a very specific regional climate over Karakoram”Julie GardelleCNRS-Grenoble

The French scientists, from the National Centre for Scientific Research and the University of Grenoble, compared two models of land surface elevation derived from satellite observations, for 1999 and 2008, and report their findings in the Nature Geoscience journal.


The method has been used before in other mountain ranges, but it is not as straightforward as it might sound.
"It's not been used more because these elevation models are quite difficult to acquire - you need clear sky conditions and reduced snow cover," said lead researcher Julie Gardelle.
Other factors that can change the height of the ice surface, other than changes to the ice itself, also need to be accounted for.
Having done all these calculations, the team found that between 1999 and 2008 the mass of the glaciers in this 5,615 sq km (2,168 sq miles) region of the Karakoram increased marginally, although there were wide variations between individual glaciers.



Foggy picture

Why this should be is not clear, though it is well known from studies in other parts of the world that climate change can cause extra precipitation into cold regions which, if they are cold enough, gets added to the existing mass of ice.

                                                                                                                        
                                                                              
Some data came from the Satellite pour l'Observation de la Terre (Spot) mission

"We don't really know the reason," Ms Gardelle told BBC News.
"Right now we believe that it could be due to a very specific regional climate over Karakoram because there have been meteorological measurements showing increased winter precipitation; but that's just a guess at this stage."
Whatever the region, it is clear that the trend contrasts with other parts of the wider Himalayas-Hindu Kush region, home to an estimated 210 million people and where glaciers act as fresh water stores for about 1.3 billion living in river basins below.
Late last year, the Kathmandu-based International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (Icimod) released data showing that across 10 regularly studied glaciers, the rate of ice loss had doubled since the 1980s.
However, it also made clear just how sparse data is from the region, finding only these 10 intensively studied glaciers among a total of more than 54,000.
Measurements by the GRACE satellite mission, which detects minuscule variations in the Earth's gravitational pull, have also shown a net loss of mass across the whole region.

Graham Cogley, the scientist from Trent University in Ontario, Canada, who first publicly questioned the IPCC's 2035 figure, comments in Nature that reconciling the different mass loss figures found by different methods of study "will keep glaciologists busy for some time".




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Post time 2012-4-17 19:50:40 |Display all floors
those are not glaciers.


those are man made lakes to keep out the 100,000 Tibetans.
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Post time 2012-4-18 00:09:09 |Display all floors
This post was edited by Revolutionar at 2012-4-18 00:21

global warming means there will be more water flow......until the tap runs dry...................But there is no reason to expect a sansukong to understand it.


these are frozen flood plains from the over flowing water.
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