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Chinese students lost in the dream of studying in USA   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2012-4-13 13:00:36 |Display all floors
In the past six years, Ohio University in the United States has seen a 35-fold increase in the number of Chinese undergraduate students. But the language and culture differences pose barriers that eventually lead them to indulge in a Chinese circle cut off from the outside. It seems that these young men, who flock out of their country to seek higher education, have never reached the other side of the Pacific Ocean.
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Post time 2012-4-13 13:01:21 |Display all floors
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From 2004 to 2010, the number of Chinese undergraduates in Ohio University surged from 17 to 603. Today, 81 percent of international students enrolled at the university hail from China. In Scott Quad, a student residence hall nicknamed “Chinatown”, 180 of the 218 residents are Chinese students. Swarms of Chinese students have even made themselves start to complain about too many people of their own race and too little chance to speak English or hang out with Americans.

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Post time 2012-4-13 13:02:15 |Display all floors
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Andy Liu, 20, comes from Tianjin. The American student who shares the dorm room with him put up a poster with a portrait of Mao Zeong and the slogan “LET’S PARTY.” Andy hopes that he can make friends with Americans. However, due to his limited English and the cultural barrier, he has found it extremely hard to blend into the party culture even in this university, which is named the country’s top party school.

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Post time 2012-4-13 13:03:02 |Display all floors
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All newly enrolled students that speak English as the second language are required to complete an English program and pass the English proficiency test before they can begin taking university classes. Many are stuck with English as a result. It is Andy’s fourth year in Ohio University. Because he has failed the Test of English as a Foreign Language, or Toefl, five times in a row, the only option for him is to keep studying English. “I learn the same thing every day over and over again, and I cannot see the end of it or any hope.”

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Post time 2012-4-13 13:03:44 |Display all floors
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Andy Liu’s girlfriend, Popo Huang, comes from Guangzhou and now is a Fine Arts major at Ohio University. After she failed the gaokao, or National College Entrance Exam, by just two points short of the cutoff score, she chose to study abroad. At the beginning, her family was strongly opposed to her choice of Fine Arts, a relatively obscure and less popular academic major among Chinese students. In the end, Popo convinced her parents that she can later be a designer at the company her family runs after she studies Fine Arts and graduates.

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Post time 2012-4-13 13:04:29 |Display all floors
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“China’s educational system makes students spend most of their time dealing with tests and does poorly in (encouraging) creative and independent thinking,” Popo said. Popo speaks decent English. She has passed the language proficiency test and begun her academic study. In spite of having many American classmates, she still believes that the cultural barrier is insurmountable. “I cannot get some of the American jokes, and yet I can only laugh along.”

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Post time 2012-4-13 13:05:10 |Display all floors
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Most Chinese students come from big cities and have a hard time adapting themselves to life in American small towns. “The previous picture of America in my mind is (composed of) big cities like New York and Los Angeles. But after I arrived in Ohio, I find it is totally different.” After the class is over, Popo, in cheetah print leggings and patent leather pumps, leaves the classroom. She says that she loves to dress differently than others.

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