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Forbes: The world's healthiest diet [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2012-1-31 16:24:42 |Display all floors
Japan
Obesity rate: 1.5%
Life expectancy: 82 years

Pasternak praises Japanese cuisine for its focus on cruciferous vegetables like cabbage, broccoli, bok choy and kale. The main sources of protein in the Japanese diet--fish and soy--are also heart healthy. Finally, the Japanese eat plenty of complex carbohydrates in the form of nutrient-rich buckwheat noodles. Some Japanese practice calorie restriction, eating only until they feel 80% full.
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Post time 2012-1-31 16:25:15 |Display all floors
Singapore
Obesity rate: 1.8%
Life expectancy: 82 years

You might be surprised to learn that Singaporeans who eat white rice throughout the day have one of the healthiest diets on the planet, according to Pasternak. But that staple carbohydrate is often rounded out with servings of vegetables and fish. Singaporeans eat meat sparingly. To satisfy sweet cravings, they tend to stick to readily available tropical fruits or low-sugar treats like mango pudding.
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Post time 2012-1-31 16:25:39 |Display all floors
China
Obesity rate: 1.8%
Life expectancy: 73 years

America's version of Chinese food doesn't come close to the real thing--and that's why Pasternak has singled out the country as having a very healthy traditional diet. Two-thirds of meals are made up of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans, he estimates. This includes leafy greens like bok choy, root vegetables like daikon, and soybeans, ginger and garlic. Though the Chinese do deep-fry foods, they more often stir-fry, steam or stew meats and vegetables.
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Post time 2012-1-31 16:26:00 |Display all floors
Sweden
Obesity rate: 11%
Life expectancy: 81 years

This Nordic country does well despite a relative lack of fruits and vegetables. The key, says Pasternak, is a diet rich in dairy, dark breads, berries and fish. The calcium in dairy can help the body burn fat; rye and pumpernickel breads are loaded with fiber; berries have antioxidant properties; and the salmon and herring is heart-healthy. It also helps that the Swedes burn plenty of calories year-round with cross-country skiing and other winter sports.

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Post time 2012-1-31 16:26:23 |Display all floors
France
Obesity rate: 6.6%
Life expectancy: 81 years

Most people know about the so-called French paradox: The French regularly indulge in high-fat foods like cheese and chocolate without packing on the pounds. Pasternak attributes this to small portion sizes and the fact that they seldom snack. Vegetables also play a starring role in meals even when the main course is a meat dish. While the French also aren't afraid to use butter, they tend to prepare meals by baking, roasting and braising--all low-fat ways of cooking.
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Post time 2012-1-31 16:26:50 |Display all floors
Italy
Obesity rate: 13%
Life expectancy: 80 years

Traditional Italian cuisine isn't anything like the cheesy, meat-laden pasta-heavy dishes served up in most Italian restaurants here. Instead, it's rich in beans and vegetables. Pasta is popular, but Pasternak points out that it's eaten in limited quantities, often as a side dish. The Italians also cook with olive oil, an unsaturated fat that's good for the heart. They rely on healthy preparation as well, grilling, poaching, baking and steaming much of their food.
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Post time 2012-1-31 16:27:13 |Display all floors
Spain
Obesity rate: 16%
Life expectancy: 80 years

Famous for its cured pork, Spain doesn't necessarily leap to mind as a country with a healthy diet. But Pasternak praises the Spaniards for their high-fiber, low-fat Mediterranean eating habits. They cook with olive oil, use loads of beans and vegetables, and eat plenty of fish like trout, mussels and shrimp. Native almonds and citrus fruits are also healthy staples of the Spanish diet. The Spanish rarely fry food. Instead they stew, sauté and roast it.

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