Author: oyeshi

Ouch! 9 myths about low back pain [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2012-1-25 00:21:20 |Display all floors
Medications are more effective than hands-on therapy

In a Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center 2009 survey of more than 14,000 subscribers who experienced low back pain over the previous year but never had back surgery, hands-on treatments were rated very helpful by sufferers. Fifty-eight percent of survey respondents favored chiropractic treatments, while 48 percent liked massage and 46 percent preferred physical therapy. This was quite a testament to the healing power of touch.


Of those patients who had taken prescription medications in the previous year, 40 percent said they were helped a lot by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and 43 percent by muscle relaxants.


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Post time 2012-1-25 00:22:26 |Display all floors
It matters how you lift

Well - yes and no. While the advice is sound and it's better to: bend at your knees, not at your waist; lift using your leg muscles; tighten your abdominal muscles; and hold the object close to your body - if you have a known back problem, like a herniated disc, it's best to avoid strenuous lifting entirely.


It's fairly common for me to see return patients who get into trouble because they continued to lift heavy weights at the gym, moved furniture, or shoveled snow.



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Post time 2012-1-25 00:23:54 |Display all floors
Get a scan as soon as possible

Immediate or routine imaging of lumbar spines in patients with low back pain does not improve outcomes - in fact, it may make things worse for you. How? A CT scan increases your exposure to radiation, and a MRI scan may lead to unnecessary surgery. Nevertheless, lumbar imaging in the U.S. is growing at an alarming rate and some experts believe it correlates with a nearly three-fold increase in surgery rates over the past decade.


When should a doctor order a scan? If you are experiencing fever, leg muscle weakness or atrophy, a change in bowel or bladder function, have a history of cancer, or pain associated with a recent trauma.



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