Author: tippingpoint

Foshan : Reaching Beyond Shame & Fear [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2011-10-26 16:13:46 |Display all floors

Reply #8 Revolutionar's post

I agree with both their ideas.

The first author has suggested dealing with pecuniary matters which most motorists have issue with.

As for the duty to rescue law, I have already said it won't be easy to implement.  However, I do agree with Expatter about the danger of moving an injured person.

At the end of the day, it is EDUCATION that is needed -- on their rights and what must be done under those circumstances.

The ideas are good and should be considered for implementation with such adjustments made and improved over time.



---
Whampoa
When asked what they least admired about the West, they replied
MORAL DECAY, PROMISCUITY and pornography which...
DEGRADED women.

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Post time 2011-10-26 20:17:10 |Display all floors
Thanks for all your comments.

@expatter...

I completely agree that these or any proposals would need full and ongoing government support, especially with respect to improving the capacity and professionalism of China's emergency services, and to raising public awareness of what a witness's response to an accident should be.

I don't think that our ideas necessarily conflict...  A road accident relief fund would generate extra money that could be used to shorten ambulance response times, and to provide a higher level of training to paramedic staff.  The work involved, as you point out, would inevitably have to be carried out at an at least local government level, possibly in accordance with a national strategy.  Your excellent five-point summary of what practical measures are open to bystanders willing to become rescuers would have a big impact, were it widely known and followed.  Again, any large-scale public awareness campaign would be hamstrung without full government backing.

However, souping up the nation's ambulances and putting a poster on every street corner telling people what they should do will fail to have the desired impact if people remain too laissez-faire in their attitudes to bother to make the call... which is where the 'duty to rescue' provision would demonstrate its worth.  To clarify what 'duty to rescue' might actually entail, I should say that in cases of serious injury, 'rescue' as far as non-doctors are concerned will mean nothing more than alerting qualified medical personnel, and waiting for their arrival - job done.  However, you are absolutely right to push the urgency of raising public awarness about the dangers of moving an injured person, and your comment about the possibly counter-productive rescue efforts of the rubbish picker in Wang Yue's case are unsettling, but bang on the money.

Additionally, though, a 'duty to rescue' law would not provide the conditions for a litigation 'swamp', as you fear, because offenders' actions would be classed as a form of criminal negligence that would make them answerable directly to state prosecution mechanisms.  The duty that we all have to help people in need is one already far better understood than practiced, so I would expect such a measure to simplify rather than complicate people's roles in unfortunate situations, and to provide a clearer framework for future litigation than has been available in the past.

@whampoa...

I am entranced by your perspicacity in observing that "working on the system and the law [is] definitely better than blaming [...] individuals" - I couldn't agree more.

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Post time 2011-10-26 23:29:28 |Display all floors

At last ............

tippingpoint, whampoa, seneca .................

We come together on some interesting ideas and initiatives on this most profound of issues  ..........

CD, over to you  ........

How can we help to make this scenario in China  ..........

More of a reality with regard to public responsibility  .......  ?

Where there is a logical and systematically acceptable solution to this most grave social issue of public response and welfare  .......

Thank you to tipping point for the initial thread and whampoa and even seneca for considered responses ...........   

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Post time 2011-10-26 23:34:14 |Display all floors
Originally posted by tippingpoint at 2011-10-26 20:17
Thanks for all your comments.
@expatter...
I completely agree that these or any proposals would need full and ongoing government support, especially with respect to improving the capacity and ...
  ...............................................................................



Almost all of it ..........   

But some tiny reservations  .........

Maybe when I do not feel ......

Yidian lei  .........  

I will come back on at least one point   .........

Cracking so far .........   

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Post time 2011-10-27 00:09:34 |Display all floors
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Post time 2011-10-27 13:00:29 |Display all floors

After tens of Yue Yue threads ..........

I am surprised that there is not more comment in this particular thread  .........

Come on guys  .........

Many of you have complained and whinged  .........

But how to address the issue for the future is the most important thing right now ........

To change something to make it better .........

Please add your voice and let us ask the CD to propose these ideas to the next .........

CCP meeting .........

Let us have your help to make something a reality rather than just an echo in an empty drain .......

Your input and ideas here ..............

Now please   ...........   

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Post time 2011-10-28 19:49:20 |Display all floors
@magnetic1974...

Quite right - bad things do happen everywhere, and the spirit of what I wrote holds just as much sympathy for victims of callous actions around the world as for victims inside China's borders.  Although a person's suffering anywhere on earth should give us pause for reflection, this particular story did unfold in China, and as this is the forum of the China Daily newspaper, this country seems a logical place to start to express some of what we might think in response.  Drawing attention to others' faults does not conceal one's own shame, nor diminish one's responsibility.  Shame should be a catalyst for action, not for excuses.  I would like you to realise that this isn't a contest between countries, but a valuable opportunity to talk about this one (as that's where most of us live), and about how to make its tomorrow a safer time than yesterday for us all...

(...I say 'us all', rather than 'wandering infants', in deference to seneca's last comment - although I hope it may be apparent that my proposals apply equally to accident victims of any age, ethnicity, or other characteristics).

The circumstances of Wang Yue's death are hardly unique in the world, but their extremity has unleashed a great deal of dicussion during the last two weeks.  My hope is that the interest in this case will not go to waste, but might instead become the fuel and foundation for everyone in China to talk about what WE CAN ALL DO to make things BETTER.

I hope that this conversation might be forgiven for seeming to make capital out of tragedy, but I personally feel that had it been my own child's death, I would find some gratification, if not quite comfort, in hearing that other people in my country had noticed, and that some of them had even cared enough to do something to show a more genuine regret for her death than first sensationalising it, and then allowing it to be repeated indefinitely into the future.  To reference seneca, again, we have to start seeing victims as people like us, not as statistics that can be allowed to pile up out of sight.

@expatter…  'preciate your support for this thread, btw.

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