Author: sansukong

Hu: CPC must serve the people   [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-9-6 16:56:35 |Display all floors
Excerpt:


CPC's 90th birthday celebration and reflection

By Chen Xuefei (chinadaily.com.cn)
Updated: 2011-06-30 11:21



"CPC's working style is to connect the masses. During the revolutionary period,

the people supported the CPC because they realized that this is a party that

aims to help them forever."




BEIJING -


Neither hills, heat nor rabbits


Updated: 2011-09-06 07:44

By Wang Qingyun (China Daily)

Luo Xiying's job has cost her more than 40 pairs of shoes and four bicycles.




Luo Xiying, a post woman in xi province for the past 15 years, delivers letters to a resident. [Photo / Xinhua]


As a post woman in Chenfang town, xi province, Luo arrives at the office each day at 7:30 am (having pulled herself out of bed an hour and a half earlier).

In the morning she sorts letters, papers and parcels, and acts as the only clerk in the office. In the afternoon, she carries the mail to people living in eight villages scattered in the hills.

Two roads lead to the villages. One winds among hills and streams before reaching one village about 20 km away, and can only be covered by foot. The other is 25 km long, allows the use of a bicycle and has seven villages along the way.

Luo said it often takes five hours to finish a round trip of deliveries, and it's hard to say which route is easier.
"It's a bit more tiring to walk the hilly road, because I have to climb the hills. Yet on the other route I probably carry more mail by bike," she said.

Luo, 43, the daughter of a farmers' family in Chenfang, worked on the farm before becoming a postal worker.
In 1996, the post office asked Luo's parents if she would like to fill a temporary vacancy. Luo didn't expect that "temporary" position to last for 10 years, until she became an official and the only employee of the post office in 2008.

She used to carry up to 55 kg of mail, but now she is not as strong as she used to be, and there are fewer letters and telegrams today.

Yet she is proud that she has never lost one letter or made a late delivery.


"The hills seem dangerous, though. I seldom see other people walking. Sometimes there are animals popping out of the woods, such as rabbits and boar," Luo said. "It's a bit scary."

But animals are not the only frightening thing she has run into. In 2001, Luo was stopped by a man attempting to rob her.

"I was carrying parcels of mail with a pole, and suddenly he came out of the woods, asking me to give him my money."

She finally drove the robber away.

"I was so scared, there was really nothing I could do but put down the mail, grab the pole in my hand, and shout out loud."

She also suffered heatstroke while working in summer, and once passed out on the way for two hours.
"Now besides food and water, I take some medicine for heatstroke," she said.

The hardships don't stop her love for the job, however. Luo said the villagers treat her like a family member, and sometimes invite her for a meal or to stay for the night.




Luo Xiying, a post woman in xi province for the past 15 years, is on her way to deliver letters. [Photo / Xinhua]


The villages are mostly inhabited by middle-aged and elderly people.

"Every time they see me, even from a distance, they greet me aloud," Luo said.

"Some of them have a hard time getting downtown because the road is bad. So in addition to bringing the mail, they also ask me to bring them things they need, such as soy sauce."


Fifty-year-old Xu Shuihua, who is taking care of her 9-year-old grandson while her son and daughter-in-law work in another province, has known Luo for many years.

"The elderly people have been left here by younger ones who have gone out to work. Sometimes we buy things that may be too heavy to carry, and Luo helps us by carrying them with her pole, though she is already tired," Xu said.

"She is very nice. It's a natural thing we invite her for lunch or give her something. We all have feelings."
Wu Guohua, head of the Yanshan county post office, thinks Luo is an honest and kind-hearted woman.


"We have visited local people who Luo does deliveries for. They speak highly of her. She gets along with them very well. I believe it's because she has been doing a good job."

Xia Yingfang, 21, Luo's daughter, said: "It doesn't matter what kind of job my mother is doing. She has been a post woman for so long. She feels connected to it, even though the job is not easy."

"I support her as long as she is happy with it," she said.


Having spent most of her life working in the town where she was born, Luo finally got the chance to visit Myanmar in 2009 on a tour organized for outstanding postal workers in xi province.

"Many years ago, when I heard the jet engine in the sky, I thought to myself, 'if only I could travel by plane'," Luo said with a laugh.
"Now my dream has come true. I had never thought this day would come. My fate has changed."

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-9-7 02:51:14 |Display all floors
EXCERPT;

Hu: CPC must serve the people


By Zhao Huanxin (China Daily)

Updated: 2011-07-02 07:39



Home for disabled people


Updated: 2011-09-06 19:06

(Xinhua)



Liqi Daycare Center is an institution for severely challenged people in Guangzhou, capital of South China’s Guangdong province, Aug 30, 2011. Built by a local food company and funded by both the local government and residents’ families, the center now offers boarding service to 39 people. In 2009, the China Disabled Persons Federation and the Ministry of Finance launched a program to improve facilities for disabled people, and have invested 600 million yuan (about $93 million) for the cause. [Photo/Xinhua]





One of the residents at Liqi Daycare Center in Guangzhou, capital of South China’s Guangdong province, is helped by her mother, Aug 30, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]





A man has lunch at Liqi Daycare Center in Guangzhou, capital of South China’s Guangdong province, Aug 30, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]





A staffer helps a man to bed at Liqi Daycare Center in Guangzhou, capital of South China’s Guangdong province, Aug 30, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]





A staffer helps a man to his bed at Liqi Daycare Center in Guangzhou, capital of South China’s Guangdong province, Aug 30, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-9-9 04:11:08 |Display all floors

Note: Look at the condition of this "special train". It looks so run-down, old and unkempt.


Special train arranged for migrant workers



Updated: 2011-09-08 13:10

(chinadaily.com.cn)



The L107 train specially arranged for migrant workers heads to Xin Uygur autonomous region, from Lanzhou Railway Station, capital of Northwest China's Gansu province on Sept 6, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]





The L107 train specially arranged for migrant workers heads to Xin Uygur autonomous region, from Lanzhou Railway Station, capital of Northwest China's Gansu province on Sept 6, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]





The L107 train specially arranged for migrant workers heads to Xin Uygur autonomous region, from Lanzhou Railway Station, capital of Northwest China's Gansu province on Sept 6, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-9-9 05:09:07 |Display all floors
Excerpt:


CPC's 90th birthday celebration and reflection


By Chen Xuefei (chinadaily.com.cn)
Updated: 2011-06-30 11:21


"In 1949, just before the formal establishment of New China, CPC leader Mao Zedong pointed out at the party congress that facing the victory in the whole country, CPC must keep on being sober-minded. When the CPC became the ruling party, it must stand the test of ruling, thus, all Party members must continue to be modest, prudent but not arrogant, all comrades must continue to keep a hard-working and simple lifestyle.

This was the reflection and warning based on many farmers uprisings in history

and the CPC's own history.




Despite China 'miracle,' pupils still buy their own school desks


By Wan Lixin  |   2011-9-8  |      NEWSPAPER EDITION/SHANGHAI DAILY






CHINA is a land of miracles, but it is also a land of contrasts.

A series of pictures taken on August 31 in Huanggang, Hubei Province, shows children, parents or grandparents plodding to school, carrying standard desks and chairs.

The caption explains these classroom essentials have been purchased by the parents, at the behest of the school authority.

I once attended a school housed in a dilapidated granary; my desk was a wood plank resting on clay.

I also attended a village school that required the students to bring along stools and makeshift desks. That was a while back.

But the winds of change, the decades of miraculous growth seem to have bypassed this school in Hubei.

What's the brand of the car assigned to local education chief?


Recently it was revealed that in Shanghai alone there are 132,000 individuals each

with more than 10 million yuan (US$1.5 million) in personal assets. Such figures as

a rule do not include the net worth of our pampered civil servants.


For many years a number of factors have put village children to considerable

disadvantage when compared with their urban cousins.

While every conceivable kind of blandishment is used to induce urban children

to eat some food, some village pupils are battling malnutrition.


Xinhua news agency reported that since this September, children in Sanzhiyang Elementary School in Hechi, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, are entitled to a free lunch as a part of a national campaign to supply decent food to local children.

Prior to this, those students, mostly boarders, had to make do with two meals of steamed rice sprinkled with some soybeans every day. As a consequence, most of the children are suffering retarded growth.

Ostensibly these children are all in the nine-year "compulsory education" stage, when the state is supposed to provide free education.

But on average the education expenses allocated to a rural child are only around a third allocated to their urban counterpart, and are very unreliable.

Ideally, given these contrasts, college admission procedures should be adjusted in a way that compensates for rural disadvantages and favors rural students.

The opposite is true.

The proportions of university students of rustic origins have been

declining steadily in recent years.


According to a report, this year the proportion of students of rural origins in the China Agricultural University in Beijing has fallen below 30 percent, a record low.

Traditionally in China, education has never been strictly restricted to the wealthy.
[color]blue]
One of the eminent Confucian principles is youjiao wulei, or "in education there should be no class distinctions."

As a matter of fact, successful candidates of humble origins were generally sources of pride for their families and were generally respected for their hard work and excellence.

There had been powerful families in the past, but they were not perpetuated by any system of "aristocracy," as in the West.

The sad truth today is that education is perpetuating the great rural-urban divide.


The hordes of peasants fleeing their villages in search of their fortune in cities are contributing to the rural decay.

In recent years there have been many a scholarly panegyric on the "unique Chinese mode of growth."

If those academics who praise this "mode" adopted a more honest and down-to-earth attitude, they would not fail to identify two advantages peculiar to China: the availability of peasants-turned-cheap labor, and laxity of environmental protection standards.

The costs of the growth are enormous.


Left behind



Last Friday's Xinmin Evening News carries a picture featuring one small girl in Shaanxi Province posing with her grandparents in their village home, surrounded by more than a dozen empty stools, each representing a family member working outside the village as migrants to cities.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-9-9 05:42:53 |Display all floors

Reply #40 sansukong's post


"Last Friday's Xinmin Evening News carries a picture featuring one small girl in Shaanxi Province posing with her grandparents in their village home, surrounded by more than a dozen empty stools, each representing a family member working outside the village as migrants to cities."





Xuan Peizhong, 67, his wife and his grandson, with more than ten stools reserved for the other family members who left village to work or study, sit in the home yard in Tuiziliang twon, Dingbian county, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, August 23, 2011.[Photo/Xinhua]

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-9-9 13:44:12 |Display all floors
Excerpt:

CPC's 90th birthday celebration and reflection


By Chen Xuefei (chinadaily.com.cn)
Updated: 2011-06-30 11:21



Currently China is facing new challenges of narrowing the gap between the rich and

poor and the transformation of its growth pattern. That is how to share the cake.


How can the CPC encourage those who get rich first to invest in the western poor regions and really help development in the poor regions? How can the government gradually establish a social security system for all? It again needs the wisdom of the CPC to solve the problem with proper policies.



A rural teacher who shoulders more


Updated: 2011-09-09 11:54
(chinadaily.com.cn)



Shao Jun, a rural teacher who lost his right arm, lectures a class of Dongshan Primary School in Sanbing county, Chaohu city, in East China’s Anhui province on Sep 7, 2011. Shao, 43, lost his right arm 25 years ago as a migrant worker and returned home 13 years ago, getting a job a rural teacher. As more students attend lessons away from the village, the school has only 13 students and two teachers, with 10 in their first grade and three in second grade. Shao teaches the three second graders all their subjects. Shao’s students said they respect him not only for the knowledge he taught them, but also because he prepares meals for them and accompanies them on the hilly road back home after class. Shao says he is satisfied with his life, with a monthly income of 700 yuan ($104), especially when his students call him “Teacher Shao”. He said although the school is in a poor condition, the students here spend their time studying hard. “A rural teacher should bare more responsibility to teach every student well, in order to help them get better education away from the mountain,” Shao said. [Photo/Xinhua]





Shao Jun, 43, teaches Chinese with his left hand at a class of Dongshan Primary School in Sanbing county, Chaohu city, in East China’s Anhui province on Sep 7, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]





Shao has lunch with his students in Dongshan Primary School in Sanbing county, Chaohu city, in East China’s Anhui province on Sep 7, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]





Shao Jun and his three class members in Dongshan Primary School in Sanbing county, Chaohu city, in East China’s Anhui province on Sep 7, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]





Shao and another rural teacher at class in Dongshan Primary School in Sanbing county, Chaohu city, in East China’s Anhui province on Sep 7, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua] [/color=blue]





Shao prepares for the next day’s class late in the evening with his left hand in Dongshan Primary School in Sanbing county, Chaohu city, in East China’s Anhui province on Sep 7, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]





Shao sees his students get back home in Sanbing county, Chaohu city, in East China’s Anhui province on Sep 7, 2011. [Photo/Xinhua]

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-9-9 16:12:49 |Display all floors

Wen vows to increase investment in rural education


Updated: 2011-09-09 14:19

(Xinhua)


BEIJING -

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao has promised to increase rural education investment

and improve the welfare of rural students as the country looks to tackle the uneven

distribution of educational resources between rural and urban areas.


Wen made the promise in a speech delivered to more than 1,000 teachers during a visit to a middle school in northern China's Hebei province late last month. The full text of the speech was published by People's Daily on Friday.

In his speech, Wen pledged to offer financial subsidies to primary and middle schools in China's less-developed central and western provinces so they can provide better food for students.

Rural schools in wealthier regions are encouraged to "buy the best shuttle buses and hire the best drivers" in order to set up a "green channel" to bolster children's safety, according to Wen.

In an effort to seek coordinated and balanced education development, Wen underlined the efficient use of educational resources and said education authorities need to address challenges brought about by China's fast-paced urbanization.

Wen said it is important to enlarge and improve the quality of the country's boarding schools, which accommodate millions of rural children that were left behind by their migrant worker parents.

The Premier also underscored the importance of promoting the development of compulsory education, pre-school education and vocational training in rural areas.

China's nine-year compulsory education program typically consists of six years of elementary school and three years of junior high school.

Wen additionally pledged to improve the welfare of the country's 9 million impoverished

rural teachers The government will increase rural teachers' salaries and wealthier

regions are encouraged to establish affordable housing projects for teachers,

according to Wen.

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.