Author: cjamesyee

Garden of Eden is Here [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-3-20 09:09:48 |Display all floors
GARDEN OF EDEN IS HERE.
:)
余优素福

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-3-20 09:16:06 |Display all floors
Where is JFenix???

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-3-20 09:18:18 |Display all floors
Dreaming, timbatu? LOL
The Brotherhood of Knights of the Mystic Sea

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-3-20 09:26:18 |Display all floors

There is no God but God

From its very inception the Islamic mission was dedicated to a revival and purification of the ‘religion of Abraham’, that is to say, the Judeo-Christian tradition. It adopted the strict, monotheistic credo of the Old Testament, and was hostile to the paganism that was still flourishing in Arabia. Muhammad’s first act, following his acceptance as a religious leader by the townspeople of Mecca, was to destroy the three hundred and sixty idols around the Ka’bah. Up to this time Mecca had been an important centre of pagan pilgrimage. Like so much else in Islam, this excoriation of idolatrous practices was a clear continuation of the Biblical prophetic tradition - but Islam brought a new understanding of its basic religious principles.

The Islamic rejection of any form of idolatry is bound up with its rejection of any notion of divine intercession. The individual has a direct line to God; ultimately, redemption and damnation are individual matters. The Islamic attitudes towards images and imagery (a subject to which I shall return) have always been concerned with the purity of the human/divine relationship. The worship of idolatrous images, in this view, is therefore both delusory and useless. For other imagery, interpretations vary, but in general, representations that do not seek to create an illusion, or pretence of reality, are acceptable if kept away from any place of prayer.
余优素福

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-3-20 09:31:59 |Display all floors

Traditions (Hadith)

The Revelations that comprise the Holy Qur’an are, of course, the foundation of Islam, but the recorded sayings and deeds of the Prophet, the Hadith, constitute another body of religious texts. The hadith do not have the scriptural authority of the Qur’an, indeed they have varying levels of authenticity, but they are an important secondary source of religious guidance. There are various hadith that refer to artistic creation. The most notable of these records Muhammad as saying that ‘No angel will enter a house in which there are images’. Although this has been interpreted as an injunction against figural representation by more puritanical elements, it was almost certainly directed against household idols. Another Hadith warns the maker of images that on the Day of Judgement he will be required to breathe life into his creations, and on failing will be condemned. But this too was primarily concerned with idolatry.

Although the reservations expressed in these hadith about the portrayal of living things obviously derive from the Jewish tradition, the Islamic interpretation makes a new distinction between vegetable and animal subjects, with the former being allowed, even in Mosques, and the latter banned. There is a similar line of demarcation between flat and sculpted surfaces, expressed in a hadith that disapproves of art forms that ‘create a shadow’; this is closer to the Jewish original. These concerns are clearly directed towards representations that try to create an illusion of animate reality, an enterprise that might be interpreted as an attempt to imitate Allah, who alone can create life. It is the case, however, that images of plants were used as decoration from the very earliest period of mosque-building.
余优素福

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-3-20 09:46:33 |Display all floors
The Islamic stance on the use of images for religious purposes was formed at a time when the Christian Church was involved in its own controversy about the subject. Christianity, like Islam, had originally followed Jewish precepts on the matter of images. In the course of time however this influence had receded, but the various Christians communities and sects had came to adopt very different views on the subject. In fact there were serious arguments within the broader Church for centuries as to whether it was proper, or not, to use images of Christ, the saints and the martyrs as an aid to worship. Naturally, as in all theological matters, the partisans on either side were equally fervent in their beliefs. Islam encountered this controversy, and was obliged to intervene, when it conquered the Christian middle-East.

From an Islamic standpoint, the Christian use of images in their liturgy, together with the dogma of the Holy Trinity and various other articles of their faith, simply proved the extent of Christian departure from pure monotheism. To Muslims they were all anathema. In 721 (102 AH) the Umayyad Caliph Yazid II ordered all images (including those in mosaic) to be removed from the Churches within his domains, and all coins bearing figures of the Christian Emperor to be replaced with de-Christianised versions. In the process, Islamic primacy (and self-righteousness) was asserted and Christian faith and practice backfooted.

The effects of this Islamic iconoclast campaign on the Church, both within the conquered territories and in the heartland of the Byzantine Empire, were to be very far reaching. The loss of vast swathes of their territory to the Muslims had already severely shaken Byzantium. There were many who blamed the Churches wealth and arrogance for invoking this divine punishment, and the long-running dispute concerning the use of images became the focus of a power struggle, and a virtual civil war, within the remaining part of the Empire. The Iconoclast Controversy raged on for well over a century, involving the Emperors themselves, some of whom were partisans for, others against, Icon-worship. Much blood was spilt in this crisis, which saw a constant fluctuation of fortunes between the opposing factions.

In the end the Iconophiles won the day in Byzantium. Icons were restored to the Churches in 843 CE (an event that is still celebrated in the Orthodox Church), and their use has continued right up to the present. For the Muslims, of course, the whole episode provided further confirmation (if any were needed) of the grievous errors accompanying Christian belief.
余优素福

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2011-3-20 10:25:54 |Display all floors

Beautiful

Originally posted by cjamesyee at 2011-3-13 18:33
.


This is an attractive structure.But the UAE's collaboration with the Anglo Zionist West is very ugly.What is
your stand on this,CJ ?

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.