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Chinese reporter Rui Chenggang at G20 steals show and slammed [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2010-11-19 22:00:19 |Display all floors
By Sunny Lee
Rui Chenggang, a reporter with China's CCTV. "I think I get to represent all of Asia," Rui told President Barak Obama during a press conference in G20, who said he would answer a final question from the press of Korea, the host.
"Unfortunately, I hate to disappoint you, President Obama, I;m actually Chinese," Rui said.
Obama clarified:"In fairness, though, I did say that I was going to let the Korean press aks the last question."
Rui was unwavering:"Will my Korean friends allow me to ask a question on your behalf? Yes or No?"

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Post time 2010-11-19 22:00:54 |Display all floors
Michael Anti, a Chinese journalis wrote. "It was an impolite move. I thought Obama and the Korean journalists deserved an apology," he later said in an interview.

"Watching it, I felt very awkward. It almost seemed like he was trying to push confrontation," said Mark MacKinnon, in an interview. "It put Obama in a very uncomfortable spot for having to accept the premise that China could speak on behalf of, or Chinese reporters could speak on behalf of the Asian press corps."

Some Chinese saw a symbolic jostling of power between China and the U.S. in Seoul. A blogger named Wangzifeicun said: "America often says it represents freedom and democracy of the world. Why can't a Chinese journalist represent Asia then?"

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Post time 2010-11-19 22:03:15 |Display all floors
"Rui Chenggang is China's pride. Can't you realize that?" A reader on the website Caixin said.

Some supporters of Rui pointed out that journalism by nature is a competitive profession and argued that he simply did his job, adding that what he did was very much acceptable in Western practice.

MacKinnon, the Canadian journalist, doesn't think so. "There is a difference. If you're in a scrum, then it's sort of free for all journalists. You sometimes shout over each other. But there is a different protocol. In a formalized press conference, especially in an international press conference where Obama was giving a question to the host country, to jump up and insist to ask a question and also claim to represent the entire continent, was inappropriate.

"The G20 was hosted by Canada earlier this year. And if a president gave the question to a Canadian reporter, then an American stood up and say, 'you know I speak on behalf of the North American continent,' that would be very offensive," MacKinnon said.

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Post time 2010-11-19 22:04:39 |Display all floors
After the eruption of the controversy, Rui responded on his blog, saying he was no more aggressive than American journalists. "Actually, asking a question of an American president is not a big deal. Obama almost every day faces various challenging and even a (verbal) assault from journalists. This is part of his job."

Yet a Chinese blogger challenged whether Rui would behave the same way in front of a Chinese president. "Certainly, he wouldn't dare to," he said.

It's Rui's over-confidence, not the substance of his question, that unnerved people who saw Rui as cocky and overbearing. Some critics say Rui is a vignette of today's China, with two conflicting identities. On the one hand, it is increasingly confident and powerful, but on the other this is seen by some as increasingly being arrogant and domineering.

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Post time 2010-11-19 22:06:30 |Display all floors
"China has a really bad image problem," Rui told the American media last year. Some observers say he has contributed to it. "Rui's behavior might undermine the image of Chinese journalists, or even that of China abroad," said Wang Zhaokun, a journalist with the Global Times.

h  t  t   p   ://   w  w  w   .  koreatimes.co.kr    /www/news/nation/2010/11/116_76594.html

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Post time 2010-11-19 22:07:37 |Display all floors
"China has a really bad image problem," Rui told the American media last year. Some observers say he has contributed to it. "Rui's behavior might undermine the image of Chinese journalists, or even that of China abroad," said Wang Zhaokun, a journalist with the Global Times.

h  t  t   p   :/  /   w  w  w   .  koreatimes   .co  .kr    /  w  w   w/    news/nation/2010/11/116_76594.html

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Post time 2010-11-19 22:31:50 |Display all floors
Rui is arrogant and ignorant. During an interview,  instead of apologisng for the faux pas, he tried to sidestep the question whether he has the right to represent Asian people with feeble argument- "represent" in English has different connotations in different contexts,  and many Chinese are incapable of comprehending the word -represent appropriately.

As an Asian and Chinese as well, I don't want to be represented.  I hope Mr. Rui could seriously appologise for the clanger he's dropped, and rebuild the journalism of his.

[ Last edited by ilearnabc at 2010-11-19 10:33 PM ]

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