Author: freetofly

Is it time for China to promote Buddhism? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2010-10-1 20:03:54 |Display all floors
Originally posted by kyosan at 2010-10-1 13:40
I think that saying Buddhism is similar to medicine is a very good way to describe it. That is exactly what it is. And you can also think of it as a philosophy. It's a philosophy that helps people  ...


I noticed that people's believing in some religion is differentiated into several levels
There are both unintelligent believers and high intelligent believers
For those weak and dense people, religion can work as medicine, helping them to face difficulties in life and stand with hope
For those smart and shrewd people, religion can work as a philosophy (I like your word to consider it a philosophy), helping them to set good values and restrain themselves, especially from excessive desire

Actually, most Chinese are atheist
It's not a problem for us to accept some religion philosophy
I have met many Christians, coming to our places or going outside to the streets, trying to persuade others to believe the God
But Buddhism is kind of “do-nothing” and I have never met any Buddhist introduce actively their religion to me

Following your advice, I would like to change my point to “it is time for China to promote Buddhism philosophy”

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Post time 2010-10-1 20:05:01 |Display all floors
Originally posted by kyosan at 2010-10-1 13:40
I think that saying Buddhism is similar to medicine is a very good way to describe it. That is exactly what it is. And you can also think of it as a philosophy. It's a philosophy that helps people  ...


I noticed that people's believing in some religion is differentiated into several levels
There are both unintelligent believers and high intelligent believers
For those weak and dense people, religion can work as medicine, helping them to face difficulties in life and stand with hope
For those smart and shrewd people, religion can work as a philosophy (I like your word to consider it a philosophy), helping them to set good values and restrain themselves, especially from excessive desire

Actually, most Chinese are atheist
It's not a problem for us to accept some religion philosophy
I have met many Christians, coming to our places or going outside to the streets, trying to persuade others to believe the God
But Buddhism is kind of “do-nothing” and I have never met any Buddhist introduce actively their religion to me

Following your advice, I would like to change my point to “it is time for China to promote Buddhism philosophy”

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Post time 2010-10-2 19:38:52 |Display all floors

5,000-seat Christian mega church in Nanjing.

By Eric Fish

Recently the Chinese government has taken some strong steps aiding specific religions, such as funding the construction of local churches, including a 5,000-seat Christian mega church in Nanjing.

A spokesman said the government hopes that under the new policies "religions can enjoy better development."

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Post time 2010-10-2 19:48:47 |Display all floors
By James Palmer

Those European countries that were, at one stage, officially atheist are among the continent's less developed. Nobody is holding up Albania, for instance, as a role model. The argument that religion correlates strongly with a lack of development is simply bad logic, brought about by the specific conditions of recent European secularization. Correlation, as ever, does not necessarily equal causation. The author of the 2006 Pfizer college study, Phil Zuckerman, has made this clear, writing, "People think I'm arguing that secularity causes good social outcomes, and that's not necessarily the case."

Sociological studies have repeatedly shown that religious people are more socially committed, more likely to volunteer their time to aid others, have a stronger sense of community, and suf-fer less from anomie and alienation. The US, the most religious Western nation, also has by far the highest levels of charity and volunteer work.

Religion is a crucial element of a healthy civil society, something which China needs. It provides a set of values that go beyond the materialism and short-term thinking which are repeatedly derided in the Chinese press.

The rest of the world is, in fact, rapidly proving that secularization and modernity don't have to go together. Highly religious South Korea remains a powerhouse for its size, especially compared to its atheist neighbor.


The previous [US] "Great Awakenings" were strongly linked with labor reform, anti-corruption, egalitarian ideals, and women's suffrage. The anti-slavery movement was driven by evangelical Christians, while the civil rights movement grew out of the black churches of the South.

The greatest politicians tend to be both highly motivated and strongly empathic, two traits often associated with faith. No religious politicians would mean, for instance, no Reverend Martin Luther King, no Sun Yat-sen, no Gandhi, no Nelson Mandela, and no Kim Dae-jung.

China's recent steps toward a wider public role for religion should be applauded, not condemned based on the narrow experience of the modern US.

The author is an editor with the Global Times and a historian. jamespalmer@ globaltimes.com.cn

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Post time 2010-10-2 19:52:23 |Display all floors

Seneca, how wrong you are! again! and again!

Besides, this government has firmly embraced the 'scientific' approach, i.e. it repudiates anything that cannot be demonstrated as leadig to socialist bliss through dialectical negotiation in the Party sanctum.

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Post time 2010-10-3 11:57:29 |Display all floors
Originally posted by seneca at 2010-10-1 20:39


I think likening Buddhism to medicaments is NOT a good comparison; consider the use of medicamets: when you are sick and a physicia has diagnosed you as suffering from a condition that requires ...

Even the Buddhist scriptures make that analogy. There is a parable in the Lotus Sutra called "THE PARABLE OF THE EXCELLENT PHYSICIAN". In that parable Buddha likens himself to a physician and he likens the Buddhist teaching to medicine.

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Post time 2010-10-3 12:27:27 |Display all floors
Originally posted by seneca at 2010-10-1 20:47
... Besides, this government has firmly embraced the 'scientific' approach, i.e. it repudiates anything that cannot be demonstrated as leadig to socialist bliss through dialectical negotiation in the Party sanctum. This means that they have no choice but to reject your idea because Buddhism stands for a lifestyle diametrically opposite of the Marxist/Dengist ideal of worshipping the money and forgetting the metaphysical!


Marx was against any type of religion. But is the Chinese government that way? I'm not so sure. If I remember correctly, freetofly said he/she is a member of the communist party in China. But freetofly recognizes that there is value in Buddhism. So not everyone involved in the governance of China thinks the same as Marx.

From what I understand, the Chinese have their own vision of socialism and it's not necessarily the same as Marx's vision.

[ Last edited by kyosan at 2010-10-2 09:50 PM ]

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