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How to use "for your information" [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2009-8-4 16:37:22 |Display all floors
What does "for your information" mean? How to use it in business email?

My understanding is if the information is only relative to the recipient, but it is not important and it will not bring any impact if the recipient doesn't know it. Only better to know. In this case, we can use the sentence "for your information". I am not sure, am i right?

What about if the information is very important and the recipient must know it, can we still use "for your information"? :)

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Post time 2009-8-5 04:41:11 |Display all floors
Generally, it is a formal and polite way of saying "You really should know that..." or " I want you to be aware that...", or "I wish to tell you that…”.

In other words, you know, or suspect the recipient of the message (oral or written), is perhaps not aware of certain information, and you intend to tell them!

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Post time 2009-8-6 18:04:57 |Display all floors
大多情况下for your information=for your reference 是供你方参考的意思。但如果遇到严肃的事,就不宜用这一短语。

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Post time 2009-8-6 19:00:29 |Display all floors
Originally posted by marchsnow at 2009-8-6 18:04
大多情况下for your information=for your reference 是供你方参考的意思。但如果遇到严肃的事,就不宜用这一短语。




I tend to agree with terryfoy, because he is an English native speaker, he knows that better than us

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Post time 2009-8-7 03:35:29 |Display all floors
The phrase "for your information" is often used to emphasize something.

For example, someone might suppose you have attained a low education level. To correct them, you could say:
"For your information, I have a Master's Degree."

It can be used in many instances where you want to correct someone in an emphatic way.

If someone says, "You act like a spoiled child because your parents are rich."
You could respond, if appropriate, "For your information, I had to work very hard for everything I have. I am not spoiled."

When used in this way, it is usually not a good thing to say to an employer or some other person in authority.

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Post time 2009-8-7 10:19:15 |Display all floors
Originally posted by greydragon at 2009-8-7 03:35
The phrase "for your information" is often used to emphasize something.

For example, someone might suppose you have attained a low education level. To correct them, you could say:
&q ...




Thank you, very good definition of this phrase


So it is really different from "for your reference"!

[ Last edited by Zsummersun at 2009-8-7 10:20 AM ]

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Post time 2009-8-7 10:34:53 |Display all floors

But FYI may have another meaning, right?

FYI is a common initialism of "For Your Information".

FYI, short for 'For Your Information', is commonly used in email or memo messages, typically as the first thing on the subject line, to flag the message as an informational message. This is typically used to mean 'For Your Information (Only)', alternatively stated as 'Info Only', with the intent to communicate to the receiver that 'action is not required'.

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