Author: Eagleclaw1

U.S., S. Korea Troops on High Alert Amid Threats... [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 4

Post time 2009-6-2 20:06:40 |Display all floors
North Korea Readying Several Missile Tests

AP
Tuesday, June 02, 2009  

SEOUL, South Korea ? North Korea is preparing to launch three or four medium-range missiles, along with an ICBM, amid moves by Kim Jong Il to anoint his third son as heir to the world's first communist dynasty, reports and experts said Tuesday.

South Korea's Yonhap news agency said the North is preparing to fire three to four medium-range missiles from Anbyon on its east coast.

"Many vehicles mounted with mobile launchers are being spotted" at Anbyon, Yonhap quoted an unnamed government official saying. "It looks like at least three missiles will be launched."

The North has also transported what is believed to be its most advanced intercontinental ballistic missile to a base near China in the west, officials confirmed.

Yonhap did not say when the medium-range missiles, possibly a version of the Rodong series, might be launched.

The reclusive communist country was showing other signs of belligerence. Reports say that over the past several days the North has strengthened its defenses and conducted amphibious assault exercises along its western shore that could be preparations for skirmishes at sea.

South Korea has deployed a guided-missile high-speed boat to the area to "frustrate North Korea's naval provocation intentions and destroy the enemy at the scene in case of provocations," the navy said in a statement.

The ship has guided missiles that can strike enemy vessels 87 miles (140 kilometers) away, a 76mm gun and a 40mm cannon as well as a sophisticated radar system. South Korea is also sending coast guard ships to escort fishing boats near the western sea island of Yeonpyeong.

Speculation was growing that last Monday's underground nuclear test and subsequent missile launches were related to a power shift in North Korea. On Tuesday, South Korean media and an opposition lawmaker said 67-year-old Kim Jong Il's youngest son, Jong Un, 26, has been picked to be the next leader.

The announcement to North Korea's ruling party, government and military officials came after the nuclear test, South Korean newspapers Hankook Ilbo and Dong-a Ilbo reported.

The long-range missile being prepared could be timed to coincide with a June 16 summit in Washington between South Korean President Lee Myung-bak and President Barack Obama.

The missile is believed to have a range of up to 4,000 miles (6,500 kilometers), the JoongAng Ilbo newspaper reported, citing an unnamed South Korean official. That would put Alaska and the Pacific island of Guam, which has major U.S. military assets, within range.

Satellite images indicated the North had transported the missile to the new Dongchang-ni facility near China and could be ready to be fired in the next week or so, Yonhap reported.

A U.S. official confirmed the Yonhap report and said the missile was moved by train, although he did not comment on where it was moved to, and said it could be more than a week before Pyongyang was ready to launch. He spoke on condition of anonymity because the issue involved intelligence.

The U.N. Security Council was considering punitive action for the May 25 nuclear test. U.S. Ambassador Susan Rice said Monday that key powers were making progress on a new U.N. resolution that will almost certainly expand sanctions against North Korea for conducting a second nuclear test in defiance of the Security Council. It had conducted one in 2006.

But, complicating the situation, a trial was set to begin Thursday in Pyongyang of two American journalists, Laura Ling and Euna Lee, accused of entering the country illegally and engaging in "hostile acts."

Yonhap said Tuesday that North Korea has also moved a South Korean worker detained just north of the border in March to the nation's capital.

The Koreas ended their three-year war in 1953 with a truce, but North Korea said last week it would no longer abide by its conditions. It also disputes the U.N.-drawn western sea border, around which deadly clashes with South Korea occurred in 1999 and 2002.

No incidents have been reported in the Demilitarized Zone that separates the two Koreas, and life seemed normal on the North Korean side of the Yalu River, which marks the country's border with China.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2009-6-3 09:52:50 |Display all floors
Russia Delay United Nations Action on Sanctions Against North Korea Over Nuclear Test

AP
Tuesday, June 02, 2009  

UNITED NATIONS ? North Korea's allies China and Russia raised questions Tuesday about some possible new sanctions against North Korea for its recent nuclear test, delaying Security Council action sought by key Western powers, U.N. diplomats said.

But, getting a resolution out quickly is less important than getting one that has teeth, they said.

"We need meaningful sanctions," France's U.N. Ambassador Jean-Maurice Ripert stressed.

Turkey's U.N. Ambassador Baki Ilkin, the current Security Council president, said the draft resolution currently being discussed is "a highly complex text."

"It takes time, and we must get it right, so one or two days later or earlier is not that important," he told reporters. "What is important is that we do have this resolution that has an impact."

The United States, Britain and France have been pressing for a speedy council response to Pyongyang's underground nuclear test on May 25, and ambassadors from the three countries have been meeting with their counterparts from China, Russia and the two countries most closely affected by the test, Japan and South Korea, to draft a new resolution.

Some council diplomats had privately predicted that the seven countries would agree on a draft on Tuesday which would then be circulated to all 15 members of the Security Council.

But China and Russia raised some issues, what one diplomat described as a lot of little sticking points, so negotiations among the seven countries were continuing, diplomats said, speaking on condition of anonymity because the consultations are private.

Ripert expressed hope that a draft could be circulated to the full council, possibly Wednesday. Ilkin said "I would hope that we will have something in the course of this week, hopefully."

Russia's Foreign Ministry said in a statement Tuesday that Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and China's Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi "expressed common opinions on the necessity of a convincing response from the Security Council" to North Korea's nuclear test and the importance of halting the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

But Lavrov and Yang, during a phone conversation on Monday, "underlined that resolving the problem is possible only on political-diplomatic tracks," the ministry said.

This includes reviving six-party talks aimed at dismantling North Korea's nuclear program "as the most important instrument of regulating the nuclear problem of the Korean peninsula, and taking away the justified anxiety of North Korea in the sphere of security," the ministry said.

U.S. Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg said Tuesday after talks in Tokyo with Japanese Prime Minister Taro Aso that "there are a number of very creative ideas that we are sharing with partners" in considering measures to punish the North for the nuclear test.

A U.N. diplomat familiar with the talks said last week that members are discussing a variety of proposals to expand sanctions against North Korea and enforce existing sanctions imposed after Pyongyang's first nuclear test in 2006.

The proposals for expanded sanctions include widening the arms embargo to include light weapons as well as heavy weapons, freezing the assets of additional companies and individuals linked to North Korea's weapons programs, restricting flights to and from the country, and imposing restrictions on the North's financial and banking operations. The diplomat spoke on condition of anonymity because the discussions are closed.

A partial draft of the resolution, obtained last Friday, calls on U.N. members "immediately to enforce" the U.N. sanctions imposed in 2006, including ship searches for illegal weapons and a ban on luxury goods. It also calls for the immediate enforcement of an asset freeze on three North Korean companies ordered by the council after Pyongyang launched a rocket in April that many saw as a cover for testing its long-range missile technology.

The draft would also strongly condemn the nuclear test and reiterate the council's demand that North Korea abandon all nuclear weapons, return to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, allow U.N. nuclear inspections, and join in the early resumption of six-party talks.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 5Rank: 5

Post time 2009-6-3 13:16:05 |Display all floors
I'd move'em further back from the DMZ if I was the US, too much NK artillery can bear in on them.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2009-6-3 21:32:14 |Display all floors

N. Korea Assembling Missile; Tension With South Running Deep

N. Korea Assembling Missile; Tension With South Running Deep.

AP
Wednesday, June 03, 2009  

SEOUL, South Korea ? North Korea is assembling a long-range missile capable of reaching Alaska, a news report said Wednesday, as the communist regime prepared to test-fire a barrage of missiles from both coasts.

The moves further heightened tensions in the region following North Korea's underground nuclear test last week, and came as speculation grows that leader Kim Jong Il has selected his third son as heir to the secretive communist dynasty.

At the border village of Panmunjom inside the Demilitarized Zone separating the two Koreas, a military guide warned tensions are running deep.

"The possibility of armed provocation is higher than ever in the Joint Security Area," said the South Korean military guide taking journalists on a tour of the border area. He did not provide his full name saying he did not have permission to do so.

The guide also cautioned journalists not to "point at the North Koreans or make any gestures." On the North Korean side of the area, a lone guard could be seen standing with his arms to his side, just watching the journalist group.

The mass-market JoongAng Ilbo newspaper said Wednesday that a long-range missile ?transported by train to the Dongchang-ni launch site near the North's northwest coast near China ?is believed to have entered an assembly building.

The paper cited an unnamed South Korean official saying the missile was covered up and a little longer than the Taepodong-2 rocket the North fired on April 5.

An American military official confirmed an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of striking the U.S. was being readied at a base on the North's west coast. The official said it could be more than a week before Pyongyang was ready to launch. He spoke on condition of anonymity because it was an intelligence-related issue.

Separately, North Korea may soon launch three or four mid-range missiles, believed to be modified versions of its Rodong series, from its east coast, South Korea's Yonhap news agency reported.

The U.N. Security Council is considering measures to punish the North for the nuclear test, and U.S. Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg said after meeting with South Korean Vice Foreign Minister Kwon Jong-rak he still has hope the North will change course.

"We have demonstrated that this process of consultation is in fact a way to send a clear message to North Korea," he said in Seoul. "It should reverse its course on its nuclear program and then return to the path of denuclearization that we have agreed on."

At the U.N., North Korea's allies China and Russia raised questions about some possible new sanctions against North Korea, diplomats said, with one of them describing the issues as a lot of little sticking points. They spoke on condition of anonymity because the consultations are private.

Pyongyang has countered it will not accept any punishment and has warned it won't respect the 1953 truce that ended the Korean War if it is provoked.

Fearing skirmishes off its coast, South Korea, whose troops are already on high alert, sent a high-speed ship equipped with guided missiles to its western waters, where the North was reportedly staging amphibious assault training.

South Korea is also sending coast guard ships to escort fishing boats near the western sea island of Yeonpyeong.

The long-range missile being prepared by the North ?believed to have a range of up to 4,000 miles ?could be timed to coincide with a June 16 summit in Washington between South Korean President Lee Myung-bak and President Barack Obama.

Complicating the situation is Thursday's trial in Pyongyang of two American journalists, Laura Ling and Euna Lee, accused of entering the country illegally and engaging in "hostile acts."

North Korea also has custody of a South Korean worker detained at a joint industrial complex at the border. He has been transferred to Pyongyang, Yonhap said Tuesday. It said North Korea has refused to allow the delivery of daily necessities to him.

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.