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China-made cars going electric, greeen [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2009-5-8 16:22:25 |Display all floors
Shanghai, May 6 (Gasgoo.com) 'Green' vehicles highlighted the recent 2009 Shanghai auto show (April 20-28). China's automakers -- local ones and joint ventures -- have been banking on 'green' cars as the long-term strategy for sustainable grwoth. This trend has been evidenced by the fact that a couple of Chinese automakers took the wraps off of their green cars at the show.

China's car companies have a strategic reason to move quickly toward electric cars: the legacy car companies in North America, Europe and Japan haven't yet mastered the technology. According to a new forecast from research and consulting firm Frost&Sullivan, that's partly why China-based Chery, Geely, SAIC and Changan unveiled new energy cars at the Shanghai auto show last month, and why the country is heading toward electric vehicles.

Frost&Sullivan believes that there are three phases for the development of 'green' cars in China. The short term alternative solutions are LPG/CNG and hybrids. The market will gradually transit to electric vehicles in the middle stage. Fuel cell vehicles will be the choice in the long run.

Hybrids prevail in the short term

LPG/CNG vehicles have been used in China for many years. The development of LPG/CNG is hindered by the shortage of gas infrastructure and relatively unfavorable vehicle performance. Therefore, the application of LPG/CNG is limited to taxies and buses in several cities like Chengdu, Chongqing, Beijing and Shanghai.

Hybrids running on both electricity and gasoline, on the other hand, seem to gain momentum in recent years. At the 2009 Shanghai auto show, more than 20 hybrid vehicles are unveiled by Chinese domestic carmakers. However, Frost&Sullivan sees hybrids a necessary step for eventually heading toward battery electric vehicles or fuel cell vehicles.

The consumers are not fully aware of the advantages of battery electric vehicles and will slowly accept the technology. Plug-in hybrids will help the public shift from hybrids to battery-powered cars in the future. Moreover, pure electric vehicles require an extensive public charging infrastructure. It may take decades to construct the charging stations and infrastructure in China.

Electric Cars, the Next Movement

According to Tristin Lin, Senior Consultant from Frost & Sullivan, electric cars will be the next step after hybrids in China. Chinese carmakers have every reason to develop electric vehicles. Frost & Sullivan gives the detailed explanations from the government, carmakers and customer's perspectives.

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Post time 2009-5-8 17:37:19 |Display all floors
Frost & Sullivan press release
(ref: http://is.gd/xHF8)

Shanghai, 5 May 2009 – Held on April 22-28, the 13th International Automobile Industry Exhibition has become one of the most important global automotive industry events. 'Green' vehicles seem to be one of the highlights of the just-concluded show. In response to the alleviation of oil dependence and ever-increasing emission problem, the OEMs have been banking on 'green' cars as the long-term strategy for sustainable mobility. This trend does not only happen to global manufacturers, but especially holds true for domestic Chinese OEMs. This could be echoed by the fact that a couple of domestic OEMs like Chery, Geely, SAIC, and Changan took the wraps off of their green cars.

Frost & Sullivan, the growth partnership company will briefly discuss the development of 'green' cars and the future trends.

Which direction to go?

When referring to the words 'green' car, what pops up in your mind? Is it a hybrid or one of the numerous electric cars emerging these days? Perhaps a hydrogen car or a biofuel car? There are various technology options available.

From the geographic perspective, different countries go to different paths. Japan is the market leader in hybrids today, with cars like the Toyota Prius and Honda Insight. In Europe, diesels comprise a large amount of the cars driven. The United States has been a laggard in alternative vehicles. In South American countries, biofuel vehicles seem to have certain markets.

If we take a look at OEMs, the strategies are varied as well. Nissan oriented for battery electric vehicles and fuel cell vehicles and expect they can cover every market segment. Honda sees hydrogen as the long-term alternative to gasoline. Volkswagen originally focused more on diesel, but changing to hybrids now.

Apparently, car-makers tell us we have plenty of green vehicles to choose from. The question boils down to which way China should head toward and which technology Chinese OEMs will choose? In other words, what the technology roadmap looks like in terms of 'green' cars.

'Green' Cars Roadmap in China

Frost & Sullivan believes that there are three phases for the development of 'green' cars in China. The short term alternative solutions are LPG/CNG and hybrids. The market will gradually transit to Electric vehicles in the middle stage. Fuel cell vehicles will be the choice in the long run.

Hybrids Prevail in the Short Term

LPG/CNG vehicles have been used in China for many years. The development of LPG/CNG is hindered by the short of gas infrastructure and relatively unfavorable vehicle performance. Therefore, the application of LPG/CNG is limited to taxies and buses in several cities like Chengdu, Chongqing, Beijing and Shanghai. Hybrids running on both electricity and gasoline, on the other hand, seem to gain momentum in recent years. In 2009 Shanghai auto show, more than 20 hybrid vehicles are unveiled by Chinese domestic OEMs. Since their introduction in the US in late 1999, hybrid cars were considered as a short-lived second-rate technology that briefly serves a purpose until it can be substituted with something better and more enduring. Instead of being a 'bridge technology', however, Frost & Sullivan sees hybrids a necessary step for eventually heading toward battery electric vehicles or fuel cell vehicles and remain in the mainstream for quite some time in China. This is because the consumers are not fully aware of the advantages of battery electric vehicles and will slowly accept the technology. Hybrids especially plug-in hybrids will help the public to have confidence to transit from hybrids to completely battery powered cars in the future. Moreover, pure electric vehicles require an extensive public charging infrastructure. It may take decades to construct the charging stations and infrastructure in China.

Electric Cars, the Next Movement

According to Tristin Lin, Senior Consultant from Frost & Sullivan, electric cars will be the next step after hybrids in China. Chinese OEMs have every reason to develop electric vehicles. Frost & Sullivan gives the detailed explanations from the Government, OEM and customer's perspective.

Firstly, Chinese Government has determined to turn the country into one of the leading producers of all-electric vehicles within three years, and making it the world leader in electric cars and buses afterwards. As is known, electric cars by its very nature requires an integration of vastly different technologies like battery, motor and electronic controls. Successful electric car market requires integrated efforts of various market participants. Chinese Government is powerful in leveraging the resource from the very top in an efficient and effective way when it comes to support an industry development. The development of electric cars is put on the agenda of Government. According to government officials and Chinese auto executives, China is expected to raise its annual production capacity to 500,000 hybrid or all-electric cars and buses by the end of 2011.

Secondly, from OEM's perspective, Chinese OEMs would also like to make intensive efforts to develop electric cars. Opposite to making gas-powered vehicles which China lags far behind the United States, Japan and other countries, the development of electric cars makes it possible for Chinese firms to circumvent the current technology and get a leap to the next stage. The leap to a new technology can be less burdened by legacy issues for the long term.

Thirdly, from customer's perspective, electric cars have practical advantages in terms of Chinese customers' driving behavior. Under rare occasion that Chinese drive a long distance between cities. Commutes are fairly short and frequently at low speeds because of increasingly heavy traffic. So the limitations of all-electric cars, for instance, the limited distance range are not a big deal.

Based on the technology of electric cars, eventually, China is going to move toward fuel cell vehicles. The technologies of hybrid and electric cars are also applied to fuel cell vehicles.
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After a comprehensive feasibility study, electric car pioneer ZAP has found that the only place to manufacture a commercially viable electric car is in China.   

"We've compared the bill of materials to manufacture an automobile in the Western Hemisphere versus China, and nothing comes close.  Not only is this the business opportunity of a lifetime, it's an opportunity to do the right thing. China has the potential to make the dream of electric cars a reality for the world, and in turn they can benefit from this new technology. So, it's a win-win," describes ZAP CEO Steve Schneider.


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Post time 2009-5-9 10:23:36 |Display all floors
Originally posted by markwu at 2009-5-8 04:37
Secondly, from OEM's perspective, Chinese OEMs would also like to make intensive efforts to develop electric cars. Opposite to making gas-powered vehicles which China lags far behind the United States, Japan and other countries, the development of electric cars makes it possible for Chinese firms to circumvent the current technology and get a leap to the next stage. The leap to a new technology can be less burdened by legacy issues for the long term.

I think this is the high quality product that China will gain recognition for in the future.

America started to enter this arena with the EV1, a beautiful all electric car, but it was crushed by oil interests. China has the ability to jump ahead and become the leader in a field that is wide open right now.

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Post time 2009-5-9 11:04:42 |Display all floors
Originally posted by Kbay at 2009-5-8 21:55
Electric and hybrids still needs recharging!
If the electricity are products of newalble sources, then yes, it is green.
Other wise, they are not green!
Burning fossil coal to generate electrict ...

There is a youtube video of a woman in California that still has her all electric car. She has solar panels on her roof, and produces enough energy to sell back to the state for a profit. She charges her car with the energy produced.

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Post time 2009-5-10 02:11:18 |Display all floors
Originally posted by Kbay at 2009-5-8 22:20


Now that's very green!:)

It really is, the only problem is the initial investment costs for the solar panels (as they are still expensive).
----
There were many different groups developing inexpensive solar sheeting or something similar only a few years back, but that was during the Bush admin.......so I imagine they lost their government funding by being too successful .

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Post time 2009-5-14 08:47:48 |Display all floors
this is very good news, environment should come first.

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Post time 2009-5-14 12:29:45 |Display all floors

Well, electric car route could be a surprise to all of us!

Seems like a big support bandwagon for this route.

so, how has the technology coming along now.
(1) Recharging times
(2) Battery durability (or lifespan) and replacement cost.
(3) Battery weight.
(4) Vehicle range.
(5) Vehicle safety.

It's a direction that would generate a lot of interest.


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