Author: laoda1

Auctioning the looted China treasures by thieving foreigners [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2009-3-6 21:08:03 |Display all floors

we're in a new trendy auctionin things...

it was INDIA turn yesterday...and the owner of kingfisher beer in mumbai bought (gandhi relics) it for 1.8 mils at one of the auction places in newyork.  viet nam could be the next victim...maybe they would auction out uncle HO combat sandals made by the US military truck tire  

*if i were YOU...i'd hold on to my belongings instead of tossin em out of the windows (who knows you might make millions out of it)  

[ Last edited by NYChinatown at 2009-3-6 08:09 AM ]

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Post time 2009-3-6 21:52:43 |Display all floors

India fails to stop Gandhi glasses auction

And now criminal layabout heirs to colonial thieves and foreigners want to blackmail countries
where cultural relics etc etc ....were stolen and plundered in the first place........

It is now a Western and foreigners' practice to sell back these stolen items.....to the countries that
legally are the rightful owners....

Times must be really bad for these foreign scums to stoop to the gutter level ....and now resorting to blackmail.
What the auction houses are doing is really to encourage thefts by Western powers and their people to steal from
non-Western countries .... but then again if these auction houses do not conspire with thieves, then there is no more
businesses for these scums....

One does not buy back nor negotiate with thieves and blackmailers........there is no end to this when
you deal with this lot .......

Well, they will soon be teaching their children to steal .....and there will always be racist scums to rationalise
these Western 'acts of virtues'

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AFP - Friday, March 6

NEW YORK (AFP) - - India said it was prepared to bid Thursday in a controversial auction of Mahatma Gandhi's iconic round glasses after last-minute talks failed to stop the sale.ADVERTISEMENT

India earlier rejected an offer by the US collector, peace activist James Otis, to cancel the sale in exchange for the Indian government boosting health care for the poor.

That appeared to leave India, which says that the independence leader's glasses, sandals, pocket watch, bowl and plate are part of the national heritage, little option but to bid.

"We will enter the auction if required as a last resort," Indian Culture Minister Ambika Soni told NDTV in India. "The bottom line is to procure the memorabilia," Soni told reporters.

Michelle Halpern, spokeswoman for Antiquorum Auctioneers in New York, confirmed to AFP that the sale remained set for about 3:30 pm (2030 GMT).

Antiquorum has put an estimate of 20,000 to 30,000 dollars on the items, which will sell as a single lot. The final price could be higher, in part because the row over the sale has created worldwide publicity.

Gandhi's family have led bitter opposition in India to the auction, putting the government under strong pressure.

Otis, a California-based documentary film maker and promoter of Gandhi's philosophy of non-violent protest, told AFP he thought he'd been close to a deal to donate the memorabilia.

His offer, proposed in talks Wednesday with the Indian consulate in New York, would have required India to "substantially increase the proportion of the Indian government budget spent on health care for the poor during the next decade," he said.

India would also promote events in 78 countries -- one for each of Gandhi's years alive -- "to promote Gandhian non-violent resistance" and "encourage the study of Gandhian nonviolence."

If his terms had been accepted, Otis said he would have called off the deal with a lawyer ready to go to Antiquorum and retrieve the belongings. He would not have received any money himself.

India rejected the deal as infringing its sovereignty.

India's junior foreign minister, Anand Sharma, said: "Gandhi himself would not have agreed to conditions.

"The government of India, representing the sovereign people of this republic, cannot enter into such agreements where it involves specific areas of allocation of resources."

Sharma added he "was sure that Otis is aware that New Delhi has policy initiatives with historic allocations of resources, particularly for rural health programs and the education of the poor, besides other pro-poor schemes."

Gandhi was famous for rejecting material possessions. He led India's peaceful independence movement against British rule and was assassinated in New Delhi by a Hindu fanatic in 1948.

Otis says he acquired the Gandhi belongings over several years through legitimate dealers. He told AFP he owns a large collection related to the lives of famous non-violent leaders.

Also in his collection, he said, are Gandhi's blood analysis and a telegram from Indian students on which Gandhi had written: "All good causes create good wishes."

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Post time 2009-3-7 07:14:11 |Display all floors
Originally posted by laoda1 at 2009-3-6 23:52
It is now a Western and foreigners' practice to sell back these stolen items.....to the countries that
legally are the rightful owners....


I read that these items of Ghandi, were donated by the great man himself, to western supporters.

I agree that India should have these items returned to it, however there is no suggestion (except by racist fools like you) that they were ever "stolen" from India in the first place. Therefore an auction or private sale is an appropriate method to get these items of memorabilia.

Why aren't you informed by facts rather than blind ideology ?
"他不是救星, 他是一个非常淘气男孩" - Monty Python

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Post time 2009-3-7 07:33:52 |Display all floors
Originally posted by emucentral at 2009-3-7 07:14


I read that these items of Ghandi, were donated by the great man himself, to western supporters.

I agree that India should have these items returned to it, however there is no suggestion (ex ...


At least one of the Item:
The sandals he made with his own hands, and he gifted them to a British army officer who had taken photographs during his halt in Aden when he was on his way to London to attend the round table conference

All the items will come back to India for public display.

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