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10 years for Hacking the U.S Army ? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2008-11-5 16:34:12 |Display all floors
China and America have been heard to mention that the other is trying to hack their computers and we would be surprised if they didn't try.  It is called spying.  You know, James Bond stuff and been around forever.  But what about this guy.  

10 -70 years in jail and what about free speech and freedom of rights.

British hacker who broke into Pentagon may finally be sent to US

http://www.betanews.com/article/ ... nt_to_US/1217449901
By Michael Hatamoto, BetaNews
July 30, 2008, 4:31 PM

A British hacker who admitted hacking into Pentagon and NASA computers searching for evidence of extraterrestrial life has lost his latest extradition appeal. After fighting the case for more than six years in UK courts, the British House of Lords officially dismissed his appeal.

Gary McKinnon, 42, admitted to illegally accessing around 100 U.S. military and government computers while living in his north London flat from Feb 2001 to March 2002. While roaming around the systems, he was caught after downloading an image that he thought could have been an alien spacecraft.

He reportedly crashed a computer network of 2,000 U.S. Army computers for one day, and also shut down 300 computers located at a U.S. Navy weapons facility.

McKinnon reportedly caused more than $700,000 in financial damage and first faced extradition to the United States in 2006. The U.S. requested his extradition in October 2004, but there was a two-year period where he was interviewed by UK computer crime investigators at the request of the U.S. government.

The U.S. District Court of Eastern District of Virginia had to spend a few additional months reassuring the British government that McKinnon will be offered a fair trial once he arrives on US shores. Specifically, Britain wanted reassurance McKinnon wouldn't be sent to Guantanamo Bay -- where the US holds suspected terrorists -- and will be eligible for parole.

In 2006 after it was confirmed the UK was interested in McKinnon's extradition to the U.S., critics claimed he was being made into a scapegoat because the U.S. military was unable to secure its own computer networks.

Now that all of his options in the UK have been exhausted, McKinnon is expected to take the matter to the European Court of Human Rights, in an attempt to put a stay on the case until the possible ramifications of his extradition are studied.

"The biggest military hack of all time" could earn McKinnon at least 10 years in federal prison, and up to 70 years maximum if he is extradited and convicted.

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Post time 2008-11-6 11:59:26 |Display all floors
That is interesting!  I posted this to see if there would be any thoughts, but obviously not.

There are many people in this forum who do not believe in the sanctity of IPR and have fake software and yet maybe you might find that this guy should get 10 years for hacking.

For me I find it quite amusing that this ordinary guy can get past a system designed to keep the best minds of foreign powers out and yet he gets severely punished for it.  Far better for him to find the loophole than the enemy.  They should be giving him a medal and a job as they are obviously too incompetant to design a flaw proof system.

Great talent of the world is normally encouraged in the West to excell, but this guy is going to be a criminal??

Obviously hurt somebody's pride REAL bad.   

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Post time 2008-11-6 12:06:51 |Display all floors

Reply #2 expatter's post

Well, US view themselves as the most techno equipped country. knowing someone holding the key to america's failure is their top priority to destroy it.... US wouldn't use him..

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Post time 2008-11-6 12:11:33 |Display all floors
But, in a way that is what makes it strange.

To announce your failure to the world and then impose such a Draconian punishment on what is really a silly young man who did not do the damage on purpose, but rather out of curiosity.  Then to pursue this over so many years at the cost of so much more money.

The cost of the failed techno equipment is a small price to pay to discover it is flawed.   

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Post time 2008-11-6 12:14:54 |Display all floors

Reply #4 expatter's post

US just wants to reiterate how powerful they are facing intruders....
I doubt it cost US much money.
They are just putting a show on..... and having some fun...

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Post time 2008-11-6 12:23:20 |Display all floors
As usual freedom, free speech and democracy don't apply to the little guy.

Or even a form of just plain common sense.   

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Post time 2008-11-6 15:41:09 |Display all floors
Expatter,

With national security, prosecutions have to start if a case is publicly known because there can be legal issues later if you're not doing it and can't provide a sound basis. For example, if you offer the person a work contract in lieu of prosecution, that can be enough. However, if you are just being choosey, you can lose a lot of legal ground because the courts will start to suspect ulterior motives in these cases.
"Justice prevails... evil justice."

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