Author: jiefang

Suzhou classical garden --- Jiangsu province [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2008-9-21 18:31:56 |Display all floors
The owners divided the garden into two gardens, an east and west section that follows the theme of a couple. Inside, everything also comes in twos, from paths to roof linings , pagodas, to windows and rocks. It’s the details here that show the deep artistic connotation and hint at the love between the two owners.

I found something else that comes in two…pavilions. There’s one for the husband, and one for the wife. This one is called “pavilion to my love.” It’s where the husband would watch his wife perform, in the pavilion over there.
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Post time 2008-9-21 18:35:30 |Display all floors
So why did these people decide to construct the classical gardens in Suzhou?

With its captivating natural environment, mild climate, and location along the fertile Yangztze delta, Suzhou was the perfect choice. It’s advanced economics, developed handicrafts and silk trade in the Ming Dynasty allowed it to support a booming culture. During the Ming and Qing dynasties, Suzhou was so prosperous even commoners would place bamboo or stones in their yards. The literati flocked here, bringing an aura of erudition and artistry. Many of the scholars who succeeded in the official examinations were also “Jiangsu-ers,” returning to their hometown after their retirement. Gradually, excellent craftsmen gathered in Suzhou, drawing even more people with the classical garden dream.
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Post time 2008-9-21 18:38:50 |Display all floors
What were things like in the Ming Dynasty, when these gardens blossomed?

From 514 B.C., the King of Wu started to build these gardens. From the Tang Dynasty to the Northern Song, it slowly developed, reaching its height in the Ming Dynasty.

At one point, there were almost 300 classical gardens in Suzhou. The construction of the gardens was on the verge of perfection, with a specific division of labor. The famous architect who designed the Forbidden Palace in Beijing, Kuan Xiang, was hired from Suzhou. There are hints of the classical gardens within the Forbidden Palace. There was also a study on the construction of the gardens and two of the most representative works were written in the Ming Dynasty…
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Post time 2008-9-21 18:42:04 |Display all floors
Around me is a living piece of art. Now, it seems like mother nature created this work. But in reality, it was created by humans. Every rock, every tree, and every drop of water was specifically put into place just like a piece of music or maybe a poem, a painting. This is a work of art you would show to your friends that you would invite to your home.

Just like you would invite someone to enjoy music, you would welcome them to savor your beautiful garden.

However, building a garden was not something everyone could do, there are specific characteristics.

The first thing to remember is that these were man-made constructions that modeled nature, but perfected it. The best gardens were those that looked most pristine, seemingly untouched by man.

Additionally, you can feel of the breath of artists and scholars at every corner of the gardens, since they contributed to its design. The gardens are a blend of poetry, paintings, literature, and opera.
Art is built into its very blood and soul.
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Post time 2008-9-21 18:44:40 |Display all floors
Chinese characters are difficult to read, but poetic. Just like this poem here, many of the poems mentioned birds, they mentioned water, grass, and this garden is poetic in the same sense because it brings these elements all together just from people’s imagination into reality

With the design contribution of scholars, like one of the four great scholars, Wen Zhengming’s participation in the Humble Administrator’s Garden, gardens turned into art themselves, with a poetic nature. The calligraphy on any regular terrace became an allusion, filled with emotion.

Layout was also based on the principles of feng shui, and the arrangement of the objects was more important than the objects themselves. Their design created a balanced relationship between nature, the objects in the garden, literary allusions and the observer.
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Post time 2008-9-21 18:48:00 |Display all floors
There are some basic rules to building a classical garden. The rules had to be followed and a certain balance needed to be attained. What are those rules?

The four basic elements were rock formation, water, plants and other constructed elements.

First are the unmoving rock-mountains. These rock formations were built like sculptures, either standing alone or in groups. They were shipped from Lake Tai and made into specific designs that looked like mountains.

Water was another crucial element, sometimes making up over half of the size of the garden. The flowing waters contrasted sharply with the solid mountains and added to the natural feel. Many objects would be constructed based on the water flow’s direction, the reflection of the sky and other objects in the water, and the sound of the ripples.

Plants and flowers were chosen for their symbolic meanings and literary associations. For instance, pines, with their were tough and rugged points, were considered symbols of the virtuous scholar; the cypress, twisted and withered, was a symbol of longevity.
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Post time 2008-9-21 18:49:13 |Display all floors

Suzhou classical garden

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