Author: pegasus01

why so few works of sci-fiction at present age in china? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2008-6-10 11:50:53 |Display all floors

Reply #1 pegasus01's post

when the people are poor, due to strange ideology of "un natural economic order"
there isn't enough educated people, with enough "free time" to write and think.
when there is INTOLERANCE and CULTURE OF SILENCING, culture becomes stagnant.


Green Dragon

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Post time 2008-6-10 12:40:00 |Display all floors
At the risk of sounding like a China basher, I think it's because the youth of China aren't taught to use, or develop an imagination. From my experience, they're taught about their history, their duty and how to pass, or fail exams....and that's it! Sci Fi takes imagination and until the younger folks learn to fly in their minds, it's going to be hard for them to write such things.

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Post time 2008-6-10 13:00:41 |Display all floors
Originally posted by greendragon at 2008-6-10 13:50
when the people are poor, due to strange ideology of "un natural economic order"
there isn't enough educated people, with enough "free time" to write and think.
when there is INTOLERANCE and CULTURE OF SILENCING, culture becomes stagnant. ...


Sometimes our good friend GD, from the Kingdom of Malaysia, can be a little difficult to decipher.

However he has hit the nail on the head here, as has our Kiwi friend.

It's a shame, really, as I am sure a Chinese sci-fi writer (if they weren't constrained by ideology) would be able to provide a new and interesting cultural viewpoint into the genre.
"他不是救星, 他是一个非常淘气男孩" - Monty Python

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Post time 2008-6-10 13:16:23 |Display all floors
I agree with Exportedkiwi, the education system in China does not teach the young how to think, 'out-side of the square'.

And as Emucentral says, "it would provide and interesting cultural viewpoint".  But does ideology play the most significant part in this?

We can see from Chinese films and books that they do not lack a certain fantasy in their story telling. People who can jump buildings and fly whilst performing all manner of martial arts. But traditionally it would seem that the Chinese look at stories form the retrospective rather than the prospective.

Almost as if hey base stories on what they know rather than what they don't know.  We can see this same trait in the stories in Europe in the likes of Beowolf.  The Greeks and Trojans the same with their theatre and tales. Homeric tales of valour and chivalry.

I wonder if the catylyst was the Industrial Revolution in Europe?  Man suddenly seeing horses replaced, machinery replacing people in all manner of labour.  Causitating the minds of the time to ask, "where is this all going?'

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Post time 2008-6-10 15:45:36 |Display all floors
Originally posted by expatter at 2008-6-10 15:16
And as Emucentral says, "it would provide and interesting cultural viewpoint".  But does ideology play the most significant part in this?...


Expatter,

Firstly I should clarify that I don't see anything wrong with the Asian preoccupation with those "historical fantasy" type stories. It has a whole heap of cultural attributes of its own, as well as being popular and successful in those markets, so good on 'em.

But science fiction (or "social fiction" set in the future) is equally applicable to people of Asia as it is to people from elsewhere in the world.
The relative lack of Chinese authors in this genre (as this thread discusses) may be due to a number of issues.
In mentioning ideology, I was following on from earlier posts which mentioned the concentration on facts and "rote learning" rather than imagination and creativity.
Since China's development as the PRC, there have been "cultural" issues under the communist leadership and its only relatively recently that there has been more political openness.
In the old days of communism, and not just in China, it seemed that there almost always had to be a message which went along with the ideology, or was neutral at least.
If someone wrote a Chinese sci-fi 30 - 40 years ago (and I am sure there would have been plenty) then surely it would have been quite "compatible" with the political ideology of the day, as things were a lot tighter then. A story of this type would not be of any interest to the general reader outside China as it would be laden with political overtones, compared to sci-fi from western authors.
Western sci fi authors, on the other hand, had more freedom to discuss issues of a political or societal nature in their stories but in the context of wondering how society functioned in the future, rather than re-inforcing a particular line.

So I guess that there is or was a lack of a "critical mass" of sci-fi authors (writing stories of worldwide appeal) in China from decades past, which has resulted in a lack of impetus in creating new talent interested in the genre.
Hopefully China's recent successes with space exploration and its continuing technological advancement will lead to inspired young authors developing stories in that area, and the rest of the world can enjoy their translated works!

JB
"他不是救星, 他是一个非常淘气男孩" - Monty Python

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Post time 2008-6-10 17:28:08 |Display all floors
Emu,

Well, I'd just point out that Japan has tons of science fiction. I agree, though, that ideology in China prevents looks at the future. You can't pain a creative picture of China's future, that job belongs to the CPC's advertising department and woe to those who question it.
"Justice prevails... evil justice."

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Post time 2008-6-10 17:40:01 |Display all floors

emucentral (JB)

Hi there matey,

I agree with you Twice.

Some of the ealiest science fiction was about the moon. A Voyage to the Moon. Written by George Tucker, 1775-1861. First published in 1827. Reprinted by E. Bliss, 1975, Boston: Gregg Press, (new preface by David G. Hartwell).

I just wondered whether the Industrial Revolution was possibly the spur in this for Europeans with the advent of machines which could do predictible non stop actions and therefore people wondering where this age of marvels would lead them.  Something which didn't happen in China till more recent times.

Cheers

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