Author: force_one

Consequences of the VISA problems [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2008-6-10 17:56:32 |Display all floors
Originally posted by canadianbob at 2008-6-10 04:13
I lived there for six years.
True, there have been BIG changes in everyday life.
But minimal political reform.
Talk to a frank Chinese lawyer---and ask him how much has REALLY changed.
Then you ...



The problem is that 99,99%  of the population don't need lawyers.

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Post time 2008-6-11 19:58:34 |Display all floors
Oh...they do. They just don't use them, because 90% of cases are settled/decided before it hits the court room.

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Post time 2008-6-11 20:09:55 |Display all floors
Originally posted by glaznozt at 2008-6-11 20:58
Oh...they do. They just don't use them, because 90% of cases are settled/decided before it hits the court room.



Exactly and this is quite common in East Asia.

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Post time 2008-6-26 11:42:28 |Display all floors

Bloody Oplympix

Yeah, the visa problems has caused our company great trouble.

Lots of foreigners, who are of very high level in our company,  are required to go back by the PSB, almost causing our company to dysfunction!

And in the end, we have to hire agents to deal with our problems.  Luckily, most of the foreigners can stay now, however, they mostly have 3 months F visas, just two bosses have a 6 Month visa multiple entry.

Well, if any of you encounter the same problem, you can contact the agent:  
Jason  
Tel: 87677527
Mobile:13763390342
Email: Jason@ciicgz.com

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Post time 2008-6-26 12:39:23 |Display all floors

The information is available....

Originally posted by force_one at 2008-5-26 15:07
But, most of foreigners don’t know exactly what is going on and what is going to happen. In visa offices nobody  provide information and all the applicants just have to resigned to received their passport with a short stay visa mostly with the sadness and anguish to know what to do in the future.
...


We visited our local office in Chengdu and were provided with a document printed in English and also in Chinese that details the regulations in force for visa application/renewal. The clerk was kind enough to highlight the sections relevant to us.

As the beneficiary of an ''L'' visa issued on the strength of being married to a Chinese national, the clerk confirmed that there would be no problems in obtaining a further 12 month extension when the time came provided that I complied with the printed regulations.
(mostly harmless)

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Post time 2008-6-26 15:02:13 |Display all floors

Reply #26 fatdragon's post

yeah, it's actually no biggie really....my own visa issues were sorted out in a matter of days....foreign expert and residence permit. Either I was lucky or some folks are whipping up a storm in a teacup.

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Post time 2008-6-27 01:28:32 |Display all floors
Travel business analysts had forecast that the Games would bring 500,000 foreign
visitors and an extra $4.5 billion in revenue to Beijing this summer. But now, even
though some five-star hotels are fully booked for the Olympics, many economists are
beginning to doubt the city will get the kind of economic windfall it was hoping for.
Many hotels in Beijing are struggling to find guests; some large travel agencies have
temporarily closed branches; and people scheduled to travel here for seminars and
conferences are canceling. The number of foreign tourists visiting Beijing fell sharply in
May, dropping by 14 percent, according to the city’s statistics bureau.
Beijing residents, meanwhile, are complaining that heightened security measures could
spoil what was supposed to be Beijing’s long anticipated coming-out party. Despite years
of careful preparation — including teaching taxi drivers English and instructing locals in
how to wait in a line (not common here), and spending billions on mammoth building
projects for these Games — Beijing is starting to appear less welcoming to foreigners.
“Business is so bleak,” said Di Jian, the sales manager at the Capital Hotel in Beijing.
“Since May, very few foreigners have checked in. Our occupancy rate has dropped by 40
percent.”
Many other cities in China are also feeling the pain of fewer tourists, including Shanghai,
where some hotels say occupancy rates are down 15 to 20 percent.

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