Author: satsu_jin

Asia's rise befalls the West [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2008-5-24 07:12:59 |Display all floors

Kodama.....

How are things on your planet? Or are you posting from some parallel universe where the names are the same, but meanings completely different?

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Post time 2008-5-24 09:49:42 |Display all floors
I incline to share the Frank's view.
There is but one thing, of a potential huge impact on the future.
Western Europe has lived and gone trough the 19th century - the century of nationalisms. By the end of this epoch, in first half of 20th century, nations of Europe tasted the final outcome of the years of chauvinism, nationalism, urra-patriotism etc. Having learned and paid dearly for the lesson they are aware of the danger.

China has not yet gone through the times , when the nationalism would put her in a terrible circumstances.
This is worrying me = will Chinese learn this lesson dry, just basing on the mistakes of others, or are they doomed to go through the hell themselves in the future?
Andy Dob

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Post time 2008-5-24 10:16:20 |Display all floors
Originally posted by doberman at 2008-5-24 10:49
I incline to share the Frank's view.
There is but one thing, of a potential huge impact on the future.
Western Europe has lived and gone trough the 19th century - the century of nationalisms. By  ...



doberman,


Actually China has gone through these times. Between 1937 and 1945 the country experienced it as a victim. What we see right now is certainly no ultra nationalism but -this is just my opinion- a sound patriotism. Why is the world so afraid about it? Perhaps because they've never seen something like this before in China?  Why do we judge the Chinese any differently from the US or other countries in Asia such as Korea (the South that is) for instance? Ultra nationalistic yet nobody talks about them.

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Post time 2008-5-24 10:22:22 |Display all floors
Originally posted by canadianbob at 2008-5-24 02:32
In considering India a single p litical/economic unit, and Europe (even under the Romans) as not. The EU will be the world's largest economy for most of this century, I think, and it's laughable to ...



In considering India a single p litical/economic unit, and Europe (even under the Romans) as not. The EU will be the world's largest economy for most of this century, I think, and it's laughable to exclude a union of that size from the argument.

The reason could be that the EU is indeed a mighty economic powerhouse but still far from an unified legal entity. EU nations do compete with each other rather then speak with one voice. We don't have to go far to see how they act when big business is looming. Just look at their competition in China.

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Post time 2008-5-24 11:48:14 |Display all floors
Originally posted by satsu_jin at 2008-5-23 05:24
From today's 'Japan Times'  - an interesting comment from Hong Kong based journalist Frank Ching about Prof. Kishore Mahbubani's latest book 'The New Asian Hemisphere'.


Asia's rise befalls t ... It may be true that certain things will change, such as the current cozy arrangement whereby the World Bank is always headed by an American and the International Monetary Fund by a European, with Asians excluded.


But the UN is currently running by an Asian who's US's asskisser.

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Post time 2008-5-24 11:57:12 |Display all floors
Originally posted by satsu_jin at 2008-5-23 05:24
From today's 'Japan Times'  - an interesting comment from Hong Kong based journalist Frank Ching about Prof. Kishore Mahbubani's latest book 'The New Asian Hemisphere'.



Asia's rise befalls t ... At a time when the Chinese people have mobilized themselves to cope with the May 12 earthquake, with untold numbers volunteering to give blood, to donate money and to actually travel to devastated towns and villages to help the afflicted, it is easy to see the country's current vibrancy. There is a new spirit abroad, different from that before Deng Xiaoping launched the country on the road of reform and openness 30 years ago.


I don't think so and most Chinese won't agree on above highlighted in blk either - we are always doing so, there is not dif. b4 or after that 30 yrs  - according to an ancient Chinese saying: yi ren you nan, da jia tong dang.

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Post time 2008-5-24 12:30:04 |Display all floors
Originally posted by satsu_jin at 2008-5-24 10:16



doberman,


Actually China has gone through these times. Between 1937 and 1945 the country experienced it as a victim. What we see right now is certainly no ultra nationalism but -this is  ...


Yes, Satsu. China has experienced it as a victim, not as a source of nationalism , which ended in disaster. So in the average mind Chinese do not feel this danger of the nationalism going astray. You must know , as much as I do, that the nationalism/chauvinism are only a few ( or fewteen, fewtenty) speaches/media shows/mass meetings etc away from sound patriotism.

We might observe naionalismopatriotism in different countries and I would agree with you that for ex. South Korea ( and North K as well) show higher level of it. Same thing when I see Chinese market protected to a high degree from outsider competition , I do not forget that Korea protectionalism was much higher ( I have not seen a single Japanese car in S.Korea in 90's , though whole industry in S.K was linked to Japanese partners on technology).
The difference, Satsu is the POTENTIAL. China/Chinese is a potentially huge axe while Korea is chopstick in comparison. A danger from nationalism steering people of a country into madness is limited to a potential of this country. 1.3 bilion nation is not a fewtenty pinnut. This is the only reason why I worry about a potential danger of blown nationalism in China   and I am less worrying if it happens in Salomon Island or Laos.


World has not yet experienced what may come if things go wrong on really huge scale.
Andy Dob

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