Author: expatter

Visas [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2008-4-28 20:56:30 |Display all floors
Originally posted by fatdragon at 28-4-2008 12:52 PM
4 hours solid queing after a Chinese holiday.


Yeah, that ramps up the numbers - along with those couriers

It is easy for me to go in once on the train and pay the same day service fee which is about the same price as coming back on the train another day!!!

There is always Oxford Street shopping if you don't have to queue too much.

However, I prefer the HK route for now ...
Take me down to the paradise city, where the grass is green and the girls are pretty

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2008-4-29 11:31:07 |Display all floors

Reply #5 expatter's post

I was - and still am - very busy getting ready to move to a new place so I ended up misplacing that thread and that's why I didn't get back to you.

By the way, I used to smoke the Mighty Ducks faves, but they changed a couple of years ago and I stopped that brand. I smoke Xiao Xiongmao (Little Panda) but only the "Light Aqua" colored pack - about RMB20 a pack (less at some stores, I pay 18.50).

Getting back to visas; my meaning was not the lines in embassies in other countries that have lines and are problems, I was referring to the lines, poor service, and difficulties of Chinese people trying to get visas to ENTER those other countries.

The restrictions and difficulties that Chinese people face when trying to get a visa to enter the States, Canada, England and Australia is far, far more difficult than a foreigner trying to get a visa to enter China. There is no "visa at the border" for Chinese people wanting to travel to the States or Canada or England or Australia. There is no way for a Chinese citizen to obtain a one-month, 3-month double entry, 6-month multiple entry, or whatever, to any of those countries that can be obtained with a fraudulent business card ran off at a local printer in say Hawaii or Puerto Rico that a Chinese citizen can then use to enter the States, or in say Jersey so they can enter England.

The difficulties and onerous restrictions set against the people of China BY the States and Canada and England and Australia etc., are what COULD be levied against people FROM those countries by the China govt., if they wanted to, and that the China govt. has a right to institute IF they wanted to, and all China would be doing would be treating the people FROM those countries the same way the govt.'s OF those countries treat the people of China.

Fortunately - for people FROM those countries - the China govt. is far more sophisticated and fair-minded than the govt.'s from ANY of those countries and so even under the current situation the China govt. is continuing the fair-minded policy of allowing foreigners to obtain visas and still relatively easily.

A minor inconvenience as far as I'm concerned and an understandable one. The only part of it that I regret is that when mine is up and I need a new one I may have to spend 4 days in the he*lhole that is Hong Kong. For that reason, it's almost worth it to fly to Thailand or Dubai and catch a flight to Canada to renew my visa. The idea of having to spend more than just a few hours in HK is almost to terrible too think about.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2008-4-29 12:32:23 |Display all floors
You are simply being unrealistic, oneweare.  The reason why the western countries (although I don't know why you say "England" as England is not a state, and has no say, as an antity, over who comes in or goes out) have stricter visa requirements than China is simply that millions are desperate to get into them, and millions are not desperate to get into China.  

IF it became as difficult to get a visa for China, Chinese schools and Universities wouldn't have any foreign teachers, end of story.  

This can all be demonstrated by the fact that the UK has a minority (i.e. non white) population of about 8% - around 4 million people, all or most of whom now have UK passports.  China has but 100,000 foreigners, very very few of whom now have foreign passports.  If China's requirements are so lax, and it was equally desirable to enter both countries, China would have (proportional to size) around 100 million people from a minority (i.e. not domestic minorities like Tibetan and so on, who are rather equivalent to Welsh or Scottish) immigrant background.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2008-4-29 12:33:51 |Display all floors
I wrote quite a good reply to 'oneweare' but as usual it was not posted.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Medal Medal of honor Gold Medal July's Best Writer 2012 October's Best Writer 2012

Post time 2008-4-29 13:11:18 |Display all floors
Hi oneweare

Thanks for the ciggy info.

I yes I do so agree with you and you can find that attitude is reflected in the way the British government still refer to Beijing as Peking.

My visa is up for renewal this month and I have been here for four years.  I usually renew my visa at the local government offices. In this instance I have to send my visa to another city in China where my colleagues will renew it for me.

Do you really have to go out of China to renew in your instance????

If you do that's a real bummer.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2008-4-29 15:48:34 |Display all floors

Reply #12 expatter's post

No, not out of China, just out of the civilized part.

Until the new Temporary Visa Procedures are changed back to the standard, just going to the local Gongan Ju has also been suspended and the horror of going to HK for at least a few days is now looming for me in mid-June.

Use magic tools Report

Post time 2008-4-29 16:05:14 |Display all floors
Reminder: Author is prohibited or removed, and content is automatically blocked
Roach Exterminator

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.