Author: gotohell

Was the CIA Behind the Recent Troubles in Tibet? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2008-4-9 21:21:44 |Display all floors

<chuckle>

The C.I.A. and the folks at the Reporters without Borders? <laughter>  Don't read a lot of conservative papers like the National Review, American Spectator, or American Free Press - which consider the RSB to be a tool of the communists? <shaking head>

You must be doing something right when everyone hates you.
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Post time 2008-4-9 21:27:19 |Display all floors
Funny to see how both Interesting and Seneca disappeared from this thread after the Asia Time article. I guess there was a bit of an "ouch" there...

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Post time 2008-4-10 06:31:40 |Display all floors
Actually, I just stopped watching this thread, having responded to this same line of argument many many times elsewhere.

The article cannot lay out a plausible reasoning for CIA involvement; as with the rest of Asia Times commentary, it's just bluff, bluster and banality. When someone can explain why the CIA would actually be involved in it, I'll start taking the argument seriously. Until then, the only spooks are the ones haunting the small minds that disseminate this stupidity.
"Justice prevails... evil justice."

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Post time 2008-4-10 17:47:08 |Display all floors
Originally posted by interesting at 2008-4-10 06:31
Actually, I just stopped watching this thread, having responded to this same line of argument many many times elsewhere.

The article cannot lay out a plausible reasoning for CIA involvement; as  ...


Really? I thought the article did a decent job with this. It refers to CIA's undeniable involvement in the past and simply asks the question: why exactly would the issue be less relevant to the CIA today?

The conclusion seems to be that "it would be rather surprising if the CIA was not taking more than just a passing interest in T/bet. That is after all what it is paid to do."

Now, you claim that the article fails to "lay out a plausible reasoning for CIA involvement." My question is (I may be somewhat naive here and I certainly welcome you to correct me if I'm wrong), would not the reasons that led CIA to get involved in the past still be valid? In fact, would not CIA be even MORE interested in undermining Beijing now than it was in the 70s?

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Post time 2008-4-10 18:21:41 |Display all floors
Originally posted by oioioi at 2008-4-10 17:47


Really? I thought the article did a decent job with this. It refers to CIA's undeniable involvement in the past and simply asks the question: why exactly would the issue be less relevant to the ...


in answer to your two suppostions and two questions:
No, it didn't
No, it doesn't.
No.
No.

Clear enough? Evidence is evidence.  Not supposition, hypothesis and rumor-mongering.

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Post time 2008-4-10 18:23:21 |Display all floors
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Roach Exterminator

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Post time 2008-4-10 18:47:21 |Display all floors
The Age (Australia) 9/16/98
CIA funded covert Tibet exile campaign in 1960s

By JIM MANN

For much of the 1960s, the CIA provided the Tibetan exile movement with $1.7million a year for operations against China, including an annual subsidy of $180,000 for the Dalai Lama, according to newly released US intelligence documents.

The money for the Tibetans and the Dalai Lama was part of the CIA's worldwide effort during the early years of the Cold War to undermine communist governments, particularly in the Soviet Union and China. The government committee that approved the Tibetan operations also authorised the disastrous Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba.

The documents, published last month by the State Department, illustrate the historical background of the situation in Tibet today, in which China continues to accuse the Dalai Lama of being an agent of foreign forces seeking to separate Tibet from China.

The declassified historical documents provide the first inside details of the CIA's decade-long covert program to support the Tibetan independence movement.  At the time of the intelligence operation, the CIA was seeking to weaken Mao Zedong's hold over China. And the Tibetan exiles were looking for help to keep their movement alive after the Dalai Lama and his supporters fled Tibet after an unsuccessful 1959 revolt against Chinese rule.

The newly published files show that the collaboration between US intelligence and the Tibetans was less than ideal. ``The Tibetans by nature did not appear to be congenitally inclined towards conspiratorial proficiency,'' a top CIA official says ruefully in one memo.

One document indicates that annual Tibet expenses totalling $1,735,000 continued for four years, until 1968. At that point, the CIA cut the budget to just below $1.2million a year.

The US Government still provides some financial support for Tibetans, but openly and through other channels. In recent years, Congress has approved about $2 million annually in funding for Tibetan exiles in India.

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