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Distribution of powers in China [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2007-7-9 17:11:05 |Display all floors
I have a question that comes from the following article.

Report from the Times

Anonymous online postings are to be banned by a city in China, after residents mounted a successful internet campaign against proposals for a huge chemicals factory.

Internet users will have to provide their real names, backed up by data from their identity cards, when posting messages on more than 100,000 websites registered in Xiamen. Authorities are taking action after thousands of residents of the prosperous southern port city marched through the streets, mobilised by mobile phone text messages and an internet-based campaign.

Protesters used their mobile phones to send text reports, as well as photos and videos, to bloggers and websites in other cities, which posted live reports of the march. The local government has suspended construction of the £700 million chemicals plant, pending an investigation into the potential environmental risk.

Tian Feng, vice-director of the Xiamen Bureau of Industry and Commerce, said that a new law, the Measures for Management and Disposition of Harmful and Unhealthy Information on the Internet, would be announced soon by the city government. “All postings must implement a real-name system. We are the first in the country to do this,” Mr Tian said.

The law obliges anyone who wants to chat online to register using their identity card. Moderators of political noticeboards will be required to use their real names, and anonymous comments will be banned. Messages will be vetted before they are posted. One government official said that the protest had shown the necessity to control content on the internet. He said: “Those who illegally spread harmful or bad information will be detained or fined.”......

The clampdown seems unlikely to deter those people who dare to criticise the Government online or to voice dissenting opinions, since most are already well known to the police, and their actions are carefully monitored. Those involved in Xiamen were not political dissidents, but ordinary citizens anxious to protect the environment of their pretty seaside town, which has become a winter escape for Beijing’s wealthy, and also the value of their homes.


Is it actually legal for a local government to impose such restrictions? I would have thought that only central government can legislate on things like that, apart from the SARs. Or are places like Xiamen essentially "self-ruling city-states", unless Beijing actively wants to intervene?

[ Last edited by mencius at 2007-7-9 09:17 AM ]
"People are the water, the ruler is the boat; water can carry the boat, but it can also capsize it."

-- Li Shimin (2nd Tang Emperor, "Taizong")

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Post time 2007-7-9 17:37:43 |Display all floors
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Post time 2007-7-9 17:43:09 |Display all floors
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Post time 2007-7-9 18:06:45 |Display all floors

Of legislated laws and by-laws

Yes, I read article and withheld my comments.

China has a centrist government similar to the UK, France etc, rather than a federated government like Canada or the USofA. Beijing, by which I mean the NPC and the Politburo, have obviously not framed and legislated all the laws and regulations yet. In time, I believe, there will be a lot more committees and expert panels in the NPC advising the government in doing just that.

I think the politburo should delegate the power of making certain laws to government authorities. Lets call them "by-laws" for argument's sake. For example, it would be silly to have the NPC frame traffic laws. Let the provincial traffic authorities do it, but in conjunction and consultation with other provinces.

Telecommunications, however, is generally in the hands of the central government, whether it is a centrist or a federal one.

As for the protest, well, I won't want to live next to a chemical factory either. Does anyone remember Union Carbide and the Bhopal disaster? Can the chemical engineers in China say honestly that their safety records are better?

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Post time 2007-7-9 18:09:18 |Display all floors
Originally posted by chairman at 2007-7-9 20:00
there is nothing wrong with real identity is there Mencius.....


I haven't seen you fessing up your real name here, Chairman !!!!
"他不是救星, 他是一个非常淘气男孩" - Monty Python

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Post time 2007-7-9 18:16:34 |Display all floors
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Post time 2007-7-9 18:19:51 |Display all floors

How to become the manufacturing center of the world...

China is aspiring to be the manufacturing center of the world. Many countries depend on affordable, quality products from China, including those from the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. I am sure most of you have read the news about unscrupulous and overly greedy entrepreneurs poisoning China's reputation, literally!

May I suggest an NPC panel of experts advising the government on the enforcement of quality and standards for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry;  lets start with following by-laws:
(1) chemical and pharmaceutical industry must test their products rigorously according to sets of standards and regulations set down by the experts;
(2) the industry must have rigorous configuration management and control for each and every batch of chemical and pharmaceuticals released onto the market;
(3) it is a criminal offence to destroy paperworks for configuration management in the production process; and
(4) encourage the adoption of the "Six Sigma" methodology.

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