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Questions/Discussion about what RHYMES with what in English [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2007-6-11 09:23:48 |Display all floors
:) Rather than break the flow of the rhyming game thread with arguments
about rhymes
.... perhaps all the questions, discussions,
(and name-calling) can be put in this thread.  

Originally posted by rovi297 at 2007-6-10 04:27

please tell me if

"begin" rhyme to "again"

and "grim" to "them".


Yes, rovi, speaking as an American who has spent a lot of time with rhyme
(including writing a computer program that can verify meter and rhyme)
grim does rhyme with them
according to the way most native English speakers pronounce the words.

Some might say that grim is an "imperfect rhyme" for them,
but short "i"  followed by "m" ... and short "e" followed by "m"
are pronounced so similarly, almost every native English speaker
will say the words so that they rhyme.


As for again and begin,
the question is "what kind of rhyme" we're talking about.
"Again" and "begin" are both accented on the second syllable,
and so are usable in verse forms that have to rhyme on the
last syllable -- end rhyme

THEN THE QUESTION IS: How do you pronounce the second syllable of "again"?
Does it rhyme with "rain" or "sin"? ANSWER: Either is correct pronunciation,
but most native English speakers (in America, at least) pronounce "again"
as rhyming with "sin" rather than "rain" ...

SO: again and begin have end rhyme (as many native English speakers
pronounce them). As I do.

BOTTOM LINE: rhyme is actually a complicated issue (especially in
our context here) ...


[ Last edited by boke_usa at 2007-6-12 10:04 AM ]

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Post time 2007-6-11 09:58:52 |Display all floors
:) As I said, rovi, rhyme is a complicated issue
especially on the border of English and Chinese.

As for "theory" ... I'm not talking theory,
I'm talking as someone who has written songs
(and a lot of rhyming things in English
which he has heard spoken all his life)

rhyme is in the ear, not the eye

Can a Chinese speaker ever learn to hear
rhyme the same way as a native English speaker?

Can an English speaker ever learn to hear
rhyme the same way as a native Chines speaker?

Does Chinese rhyme the same way
as English does?


:) These are all questions I am thinking about.

As for fed and fence, trust me,
they do not rhyme in English ...

fed rhymes with ... head, said, bled, dread, wed ...

fence rhymes with ... dense, sense, rinse, hence ...

:) Why do I know that? Because I can "hear" that they do
as a native English speaker.... and singer (sometimes songwriter).

Should you be able to hear it? Does it matter?
Should you "memorize" what rhymes with what?
That's up to you.

[ Last edited by boke_usa at 2007-6-10 06:04 PM ]

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Post time 2007-6-11 10:25:54 |Display all floors
Originally posted by harregarre at 2007-6-11 05:56

QUOTE:
immouse #21: But I am determined to stick to my guns inspite of them.
boke_usa #22: The movie told a story that was very grim.

Where is the rhyme in the two sentences?
Obviously a mistake, but remember we're all doing this for fun. It's not like we are getting paid to check everything. And you are spoiling the topic right now, so we will spot even less mistakes. Thanks for that.[/quote]

ROVI:
Now go and tell your Dutch pal not to betray you while you are absent. hahahaha

He is sort of an expert, he said yours is a mistake. hahaha


Dear rovi, as you say, he is Dutch.
My knowledge of English rhyming is perhaps superior. :)

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