Author: stephen_long

guys fm all not Eng speaking countries: when did u begin to learn Eng? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2007-6-5 20:08:49 |Display all floors

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Originally posted by sinfulangel at 2007-6-5 07:57
i started learnig english whne i was 5 yo....it is sad...cos my english is still no good...ha ha


SA, you must be joking there. you know, u have been an idol for most of the English learners here.
and i bet that once u make a poll about "is SA ur idol", you will got shocked.

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Post time 2007-6-6 18:33:06 |Display all floors
from the age of 11,and i like to study english,its interesting
do All i WaNt,aLl cAn...

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Post time 2007-6-7 11:55:35 |Display all floors
Grade 1 in middle school.

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Post time 2007-6-9 13:52:48 |Display all floors
I'm Canadian and started learning English formally in Canada at the age of ten (I'd started off at a public French-medium Catholic school in Ottawa), though I'd been exposed to English to some extent since birth and to a considerable extent after the age of five off school grounds. So I could effectively understand fluent English by the age of five (though I could also speak a little) and fluent (with a strong French-language accent) by the age of 8. I'd got rid of the accent  by the age of ten more or less, though people still pick up on it on certain words (pronouncing French-derived words in English just irritates me to no end!) So I pronounce them in French unless my interlocutor really can't understand, in which case I then switch to the 'wrong' (i.e. English) pronunciation.

I'd also lived in predominantly English-speaking areas since until I'd moved to the province of Quebec and then China.

So I suppose one could argue that while English isn't my first mother tongue, it's still like my mother tongue due to the environment outside early home and school.

I must say though that my basic knowledge of Chinese, Arabic and Persian, along with my fluency in Esperanto, have influenced my English too. For instance, I tend to pronounce Persian, Arabic and Esperanto-derived words in English in the original tongues. Why, I don't know; maybe it just sounds wrong once I'm aware of its origin. So, for example, I'll pronounce Esperanto itself with a trilled r; Iran and Iraq likewise, with the a in Iran and Iraq pronounced with a long vowel half-way between a and o, and the q in Iraq from deep in the throat. I tend to pronounce Qur'an in the Arabic or Persian way likewise (Don't ask me why, but though I'm aware of its Arabic origin, the Persian pronunciaiton doesn't bother me in the least, even though the English pronunciation does.)  And environment possibly too; I was raised in a very anglophobe environment. And much of the literature I read is translated from Arabic or Persian, or written originally in English by Persian or English Orientalists. So maybe it's just considerable exposure to these Romanized Oriental spellings I suppose.

I also tend to prefer spelling according to the original if possible; resume (the noun) with acute accents, and Qur'an as above (and with an acute on the a if possible) rather than Koran. If I can, I'll also add an acute accent to the a in Iraq or Iran to indicate lengthening of the vowel. I'll pronounce my name in French and words of Chinese origin in Chinese. One peculiarity though is that, while I prefer Arabic and Persian Romanization over traditional English spelling for words of Persian or Arabic Origin, I still prefer Wade-Guiles to Pinyin when reading English literature, perhaps because the literature I read about China is often from authors before the time of Pinyin. I tend to have a penchant for literature written or translated between the 1800s and 1950's. I just do!

So my advice is, if you don't want the spelling or pronunciation of all those English words of foreign origin to pester you every time you see or hear them, don't learn too many foreign languages!

Now that I know English, French and Esperanto spelling conventions, along with Pinyin and Arabic Romanization, my spelling preferences tend to cross between languages. Of course I'll stick to Oxford spelling for formal purposes. But outside that, I still have my own peculiar preferences.

Praise the internationalization of English!
四海之内皆兄弟
-孔子

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Post time 2007-6-10 16:21:00 |Display all floors

tianyanedu

tianyanedu==>
For instance, I tend to pronounce Persian, Arabic and Esperanto-derived words in English in the original tongues


cool, super speech!

Though too many languages sometimes will affect each other, i just admire you, my super hero.

[...the problem do happens for guys who knows English and wanna learn Japanese. Damn, you have to "twist" the English pronunciation into the Japanese t0ngue, which means silly sometimes.]

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Post time 2007-6-12 15:08:45 |Display all floors
Grade one in middle school!

[ Last edited by king14785236 at 2007-6-12 03:09 PM ]

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Post time 2007-6-14 13:34:59 |Display all floors

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Originally posted by king14785236 at 2007-6-12 15:08
Grade one in middle school!


me too.
and you are a Chinese too?

   it seems only China got "middle school" in most of the cases.

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