Author: qinger

Chinese Dim Sum? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2007-3-8 15:57:19 |Display all floors
got it , thanks!
私は花の子です。名前はルンルンです。。。。。。

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Post time 2007-3-9 11:10:01 |Display all floors

Go for morning tea if you are in Guangzhou *_*

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Post time 2007-3-9 13:10:30 |Display all floors
In English we'd say "Let's go for [some] dim sum."

Some Chinese-Americans, who are a little more savvy about such things, might say "Let's have 'tea lunch' " (as an approximation of 饮茶) but that phrase is hardly common.

The movie Working Girl (1988) had this dialogue between Katherine (the boss), Ginny (another executive) and Tess (Katherine's secretary),  involving dim sum:
    Katherine
    Being new in town, I thought I'd I throw a little cocktail thing
    to introduce myself to the department, and Ginny here has some
    great ideas.  Would you jot them down?

    Tess
    Sure.

    Ginny
    The caterer is called "Acme Eats."  You can get the number from
    Information.  They do the usual hors d'oeuvres and such.  The
    "Raging Bull" has a bartender service.  And the liquor store on
    Broadway and Liberty delivers.  Got that, Bess?

    Tess
    Tess. Yeah, um, if that's the way you want to go.

    Katherine
    You have another idea?

    Tess
    Well, I was just reading a thing in W about dim sum, these
    little Chinese dumplings.  There's a restaurant on Mott St. that
    does them for cocktail parties.

    Katherine

    Oh, I just love those little dumplings!

    Tess
    It might be more fun than the usual tidbits.  I have it on my
    desk.  I could get it.

    Ginny
    You read W?

    Tess
    I read a lot of things.  I mean, you never know where the big
    ideas could come from.  You know?

    Ginny
    Well, I guess you're right.  If dumplings can be considered a big
    idea.  Well, that oughta get you started…
So, almost 20 years ago, dim sum seemed a bit "exotic" and trendy in mainstream America—not any more. :)

(And no one would suggest getting a number from "Information"—directory assistance—nowadays. You'd just Google it, Times have changed.)
中文我不会读也不会写。Really, I don't.

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Post time 2007-3-9 13:21:47 |Display all floors
Wow, chinese dim sum once seemed some popular in ammerica, that's so great.

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Post time 2007-3-9 14:56:01 |Display all floors
Originally posted by jackchoi at 2007-3-8 09:21 PM
Wow, chinese dim sum once seemed some popular in ammerica, that's so great.
Not "once seemed" → is!

I should say mainstream North America. Apologies to my terrific Canadian pals…

I meant by my comment that dim sum, which was "exotic" and trendy almost 20 years ago, now is popular and well-known all over North America. You can have dim sum in Minneapolis, Kansas City, Austin, and, of course, New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. (I'd say the best dim sum anywhere is in Vancouver, British Columbia.)

Some North Americans might still find some of the dishes unfamiliar so they have something like this:  Dim Sum: A Pocket Guide by Kit Shan Li which features big pictures and explanations of steamed, deep-fried, and pan-fried dishes, congee (or porridge) and desserts.
dim sum.png
中文我不会读也不会写。Really, I don't.

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rovi297 has been deleted
Post time 2007-3-9 16:28:35 |Display all floors

Chinese words Dim Sum are more civilized than English ones...

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Post time 2007-3-9 17:13:39 |Display all floors
Ha, ha! So true—that's food eaten with the fingers!

But dim sum is not really "finger food"—even here we'd eat dim sum with chopsticks (or. "at worst") with a fork. (In that 1988 movie, they serve the dim sum as hors d'œuvres—with toothpicks, which is not common.)

Westerners as "barbarians": I recall I heard that historically in Chinese culture cutting meat with a knife and fork at the table, if it was even thought of at all, was considered uncivilized. even "barbaric"—and picking up delicious bite-sized morsels with chopsticks was seen as so much more "refined."

I agree! Every time I use chopsticks I feel "civilized"!    (And using a knife and fork does seem, well, "barbaric.")
中文我不会读也不会写。Really, I don't.

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