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Should Chinese cartoons be protected against foreign competition? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2006-8-14 21:28:51 |Display all floors
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/cndy/2006-08/14/content_663761.htm

Cartoon crazy youngsters will only be able to catch foreign animations if they stay up late in the future. Thanks to a new notice from the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television (SARFT), no TV stations will be allowed to broadcast foreign cartoons before 8 pm, starting from September 1.

SARFT has told stations that prime time TV, from 5 pm to 8 pm, will only be allowed to show Chinese cartoons, China News Service reported yesterday.

The notice was not published on SARFT's website, but staff at Southwest China's Guizhou Provincial Television Station, who spoke on condition of anonymity, confirmed to China Daily that they received it more than two months ago. "Everyday between 5 and 8 pm, no foreign animation, or programmes about foreign animation, can be broadcast," the China News Service quoted the notice as saying.

Sino-foreign joint productions will need approval from SARFT to be shown during the three-hour period, according to the notice. The notice has been widely seen as one of a series of efforts by the administration to boost the development of the domestic animation industry.

The first major step was taken in 2000, when SARFT requested that all foreign animations get its approval before being broadcast on Chinese TV. It was followed by a notice in 2004, which stipulated that domestic animation should take up no less than 60 per cent of all the cartoons shown on each channel each season.

Since 2004 the administration has also built 15 animation industry incubators around the country. These measures have triggered a rise in private investment in animation production, according to the SARFT website. Its statistics said the length of domestic animations made in 2005 was around 40,000 minutes more than the total in the 11 years from 1994 to 2004.

Despite its rapid growth "the domestic animation industry is still a baby and the whole society should be responsible for nurturing its creativity," said Liu Jun, an associate professor at Beijing Film Academy, at an industry forum in 2005.

The development of the domestic animation industry is important for preserving ancient Chinese civilization because children and teenagers are supposed to learn traditional values from their favourite TV programmes, he added.

But industry insiders doubted whether the government's nurturing efforts will promote the sustainable development of the domestic animation industry. "After all it is creativity, rather than money, that has been lacking in animation in China," said Xu Jiang, president of the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou, capital of East China's Zhejiang Province, where dozens of animation production studios have been set up in recent years.

Produced in large quantities, domestic cartoons are sometimes sold at less than 1 per cent of their cost, according to the Xinhua News Agency. Many local television stations are only willing to pay around 10 yuan (US$1.25) per minute for domestic animation, while buying foreign animations, like Japan's "Slam Dunk," for as much as 5,000 yuan (US$625) per minute, said the Xinhua report.

Domestic animations have to first of all become interesting if they are to be popular, according to Yang Yunxia, a Beijing fashion analyst with a four-year-old daughter. "Children are not going to fall in love with something simply because they have no other options," she said.


Another problem I see is that China is going to lose credibility on the trade front by arguing against other countries' protectionism. Up until now it hasn't had to worry too much about foreign competition, or accepted it without trying to restrict it too much - though I might be wrong. However I don't see this sort of reaction is going to help it convince other countries to accept its goods without restrictions.

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[ Last edited by mencius at 2006-8-14 08:56 PM ]
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Post time 2006-8-15 19:49:26 |Display all floors

Applaud this move

I personally think that this move will leave more space for China to shape its animation industry.It not only give opportunity to the local talents and also help the industry to build up a bit before it head out to compete directly with other countries.

As I see it,most of Japanese or western cartoons are lacking content,value of any sort other than pure entertainment.And Chinese cartoons are instilling a message whether it's cultral or whatever.

I remember years ago the Korean gov't banned the widely spread of foreign movies to protect the domestic film industry,now,Korean has become the biggest exporter of movies in Asia...

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Post time 2006-8-15 20:26:08 |Display all floors
Should learn from the Korean, ban the foreign movies and promote local movie industry.

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Post time 2006-8-15 22:33:59 |Display all floors
Should other nations ban Chinese products that they think threaten their industries?  This does seem to hurt China's credibility.

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Post time 2006-8-16 18:57:45 |Display all floors
Originally posted by izzyfish at 15-8-2006 12:49
As I see it,most of Japanese or western cartoons are lacking content,value of any sort other than pure entertainment.And Chinese cartoons are instilling a message whether it's cultral or whatever.


US cartoons are one thing, but actually a lot of anime does have something meaningful to say. Characters often face personal problems, which they overcome during the series. Some do it better than others, but certainly there are "values" in anime.

However the networks select what they think the kids will enjoy the most. The problem with Chinese cartoons is that they're boring and lack originality - e.g. often using the monkey king story. They won't watch boring stuff just because that's all there is, given the alternative means of entertainment these days.
"People are the water, the ruler is the boat; water can carry the boat, but it can also capsize it."

-- Li Shimin (2nd Tang Emperor, "Taizong")

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Post time 2006-8-16 22:44:30 |Display all floors
Originally posted by mencius at 2006-8-16 18:57


actually a lot of anime does have something meaningful to say.


Maybe you are right.But wether the anime be meaningful or for pure entertainment,it means nothing to China's Superman kids.They'd go to school,deal with piles of homework,and take night classes and weekend classes,learning piano,caligraphy,chess or whatever...They are just too busy to even sit down for a glance of monkey king or Nemo or whatever...hehe

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Post time 2006-8-17 01:33:12 |Display all floors
Originally posted by izzyfish at 16-8-2006 15:44

They are just too busy to even sit down for a glance of monkey king or Nemo or whatever


From what I hear, they work hard on their homework and then make time for the good foreign cartoons - domestic stuff isn't so much of a motivation to get their work done quickly.
"People are the water, the ruler is the boat; water can carry the boat, but it can also capsize it."

-- Li Shimin (2nd Tang Emperor, "Taizong")

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