Author: raymondusa

Just another practical choice, even when it comes to language choices [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2006-5-23 09:47:34 |Display all floors

Learn Chinese the Chinese style.

Originally posted by forestservan at 2006-5-23 09:20

That is a very interesting view, MengZhi.:)

But what do you think about just using PinYin for final simplified Chinese writting/reading?
This will allowed those who major in Engineering to ...


Whatever we do we must never surrender the legacy of the language of our ancestors. To simplify it to accommodate the pace of modern living is one thing, to jettison the whole pictogram package to a romanised  version ( pinyin or not ) is sacrilegous and criminal. How are we going to explain to future generations that we sacrificed their inheritance to the whim and fancy of the realm of science or technology. Engineering and medicine can be more than adequately taught and learned in the simplified Chinese format. Pinyin is useful only for foreigners who are experiencing difficulties at the start of their Chinese course. They similarly would appreciate learning proper Chinese in the long run. We don't learn English in some Sinocized form , why should anyone else expect to learn another language based on their alphabets ?   


[ Last edited by mengzhi at 2006-5-23 09:49 AM ]

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Post time 2006-5-23 11:28:46 |Display all floors
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Post time 2006-5-23 17:18:49 |Display all floors
It's foolhardy to dump traditional chinese. as Korean and Japan simply the KANJI system( chinese charcter), the sole visiable label to represent the east asian value is traditional chinese. For political strategy, i think it's a wiser measure to reuse the traditional system as the good will to reunify the culture and soul among mainland HK macau and TW.

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Post time 2006-5-23 22:55:49 |Display all floors
Mengzhi, did you know that the "harsher-sounding" Cantonese is closer to sounding like traditional Chinese than modern Mandarin is?

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Post time 2006-5-24 14:04:32 |Display all floors
Originally posted by sockmonkey at 2006-5-23 22:55
Mengzhi, did you know that the "harsher-sounding" Cantonese is closer to sounding like traditional Chinese than modern Mandarin is?


What do you define as " traditiional Chinese "? I am of the impression that Mandarin ( from mandarins of old, official at the courts ) is the traditional Chinese ; ie the most commonly spoken and understood Chinese from antiquity . no? Please explain.:)

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Post time 2006-5-24 19:40:17 |Display all floors
Well, actually traditional sound of Chinese is not Mandarin, there was a period that the different voice of North China and South China, and later the voice of south became "legitimacy" of the whole China, it sounds a bit like the voice in Fu Jian province nowadays, and it's called "nan yin"---it's seen as sound of ancient China, The sound of Min Nan language (which is spoken widely in Fu Jian and Tai Wan) kept a lot of real traditional Chinese sound(and you can even find a few other similar sound like in suzhou and Japan). It's seen as the heritage of ancient Chinese....

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Post time 2006-5-24 23:07:06 |Display all floors
I don't know how the mandarin came into being, maybe it was mixed by the languages of northern races the north such as mongolia and manchuria during the governance  by these two races.
On the contrary, the similarity among the language of the southern coastal region and Japan, Korea unveil the history of how the language was changing and exchanging in eastern asia.

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