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Time for Playful Learning? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2006-4-2 16:01:20 |Display all floors
Time for Playful Learning?

How Chinese and Westerners prioritize between scheduled activities and free play?

Is that time for free play is regarded "wasted time" by most of Chinese parents?

Should Chinese parents encourage their child to spend more time choosing freely what to do?

I'm wondering whether this topic is worth discussing or not? Please post some comments here if you're little interested in it...Thanks!:)

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Post time 2006-4-2 16:32:36 |Display all floors
this is a quite controversial issue whether chinese parents should restrict children's free play.......it is regarded widely that allowing students to do what they like is good for the formation of their characters.we should know that children are lack of self-control.....it was reported the a chinese boy suicide just because the addiction of a popular cyber game....so parents are supposed to limit their playing time poperly...

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Post time 2006-4-2 21:24:21 |Display all floors
Originally posted by seneca at 2006-4-2 20:38
First thing: we don't "play" in English - we talk of leisure time, recreation or relaxation; what adults do in their spare time is up to them and can be one or many of a host of many diff ...


Yes...that may because different people have a different notion of the concept of play...

Actually, what I would like to discuss here is about "playful learning", which means we could really learn something through our recreation. Of course, thest kinds of play should be the positive ones...

To make my question clearly, I would like to explain my point first...Mostly, Chinese beliefs are just the opposite of the Western ideology. Western people are interested in enjoying the present. They say that life is short, so play hard. Whereas, Chinese parents always regarded education as their top priority and viewed academic achievement as one of hallmarks of Chinese civilization. Even, they see that children't success is not the result of intelligence but the result of diligence, self-discipline, and self-regulation. Moreover, in Chinese culture, people always stress that a certain amount of pressure is necessary for children's success, while Western people mostly value children's natural development.

So, I just would like to know how the attitude of Chinese (parents) toward "free time"which except for "school time"?

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Post time 2006-4-3 20:27:19 |Display all floors
Many thanks for your valuable comments and your suggestions. I really appreciate it...

Now, please let me put some individual opinions here...
I personally think most of Chinese families regarding their children’s academic achievement as top priority because high cultural expectations and the challenging learning environment in China kept them academically motivated. This can be reflected by so many things, for example, Chinese parents desire their children to honour the families and ancestors. If their children fail, they would lose face in front of their colleagues and friends.

Many Chinese parents regard free time as wasted time and seem to think that their child benefits the most from engaging in goal-oriented activities as opposed to some natural activities. Because they are convinced that children need to participate in scheduled activities and lessons after school in order to be properly prepared for adult life. Actually, Chinese parents really should balance between scheduled activities and free play for their child. For example, they should find the right formula to support children's basic scholastic skills and creative, collaborative skills.

But..the one big problem is the gaps between rich and poor, and between the well-educated and the poorly educated, have grown dramatically in China. Because these kinds of “playgroups” which offer some exploratory or free flowing activities are usually more expensive than sitting in a classroom facing a blackboard. So, the target market for these kinds of institutions may only focus on high-income or middle income families. Even some middle-income families may also be reluctant to choose this kind of “playgroup” as their first choice. Whereas, for those lower-middle or low-income families totally couldn’t afford fees. So, I think this also could be seen as a barrier for most Chinese families to send their child to these kinds of “playgroups”. This may result in some negative phenomenon, such as students would be considered as either “very smart” or “very bad”. This kind of issue indeed includes much complexity in it. And it really can be seen as a very sensitive cultural issues that Chinese must pay more attention to...

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Post time 2006-4-3 22:08:25 |Display all floors

I think all parents should encourage their kids

Originally posted by moira123 at 2006-4-2 16:01
Time for Playful Learning?

How Chinese and Westerners prioritize between scheduled activities and free play?

Is that time for free play is regarded "wasted time" by most of C ...

I think all parents should encourage their kids to participate in non-academic activities, such as , sport, music, artistic activities...life is more than just being a top student in a school setting. One man's opinion.:)

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Post time 2006-4-3 22:23:42 |Display all floors
Totally agree thunderbird:)...if that happen to me, I would feel like I was living in paradise...

but I just think the time for free play for children is squeezed a lot in China

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