Author: xperson

Some Westerners are saying that the Taiwanese regime is the legal Chinese govt!! [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2007-1-20 17:08:46 |Display all floors
Originally posted by mencius at 2007-1-20 16:32
north, why do you keep making stuff up?  


Hey, it's weird to ask this kind question to me.

It's you that should told me why Cranberries did that.
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Post time 2007-1-20 17:19:26 |Display all floors
Originally posted by emucentral at 2007-1-20 17:02
Because reality and facts are not in accordance with his narrow minded xenophobia, or maybe it's just his out and out stupidity.


Stupidity?

Err, lemme straight this out. I think the western bloc way of colonilze, plunder and robbery are vicious, but it's not stupid.

They also divided Pakistan from India, Kuwait from Iraq, Brunei from Malaya, Timor from Indonesia, Diaoyutai from China etc etc. These kind of acts are barbaric and nasty. It served well western bloc agenda of divide and conquer tactic, but it's not stupid.

Today you invented 'freedom, democracy and human rights' and at the same time enjoying lavish lifestyle from the plundered colony. Continuously using those propaganda bullsh*t to meddle/ intervene into others' matters and continuous preaching/ condemnation. It's inhumane and shameless, but it's not stupid.

Now... I plan to make a study of all those nasty ways... and plan to list the core way of how you maintain supremacy and hegemony, for others to learn... I think it's not stupid.

[ Last edited by northwest at 2007-1-20 05:20 PM ]
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Post time 2007-1-20 19:36:40 |Display all floors
Originally posted by northwest at 2007-1-20 19:19
They also divided Pakistan from India, Kuwait from Iraq, Brunei from Malaya, Timor from Indonesia, Diaoyutai from China etc etc. These kind of acts are barbaric and nasty. It served well western bloc agenda of divide and conquer tactic, but it's not stupid....


India and Pakistan's fate was due to the Muslim forces within "India" who wanted their own country.
East Timor was never part of Indonesia. It was a Portuguese colony (like Macau).
Should Indonesia have taken over the administration of Macau ? It is just as relevant as Indonesia taking over East Timor.
Indonesia took control of the former Dutch administered colonies known as the Dutch East Indies.
They consisted of very different areas with different ethnicities, religions, social traditions and racial groups.
While the Dutch colonisation of these areas was no better than other colonising nations, like Britain, Spain, Portugal and so on, the incorporation of what were totally different nationalities into the all encompassing "Indonesia" has had a far more negative effect on the minority groups with significant suppression of human rights as we have seen over the last few decades.

As to the other things you mentioned, I haven't researched them so I must take you at your word on them. Mind you, if you got them as wrong as Indonesia and India then there's no need to believe you on anything!!!!

JB
"他不是救星, 他是一个非常淘气男孩" - Monty Python

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Post time 2007-1-20 21:27:45 |Display all floors
Originally posted by emucentral at 2007-1-20 19:36
India and Pakistan's fate was due to the Muslim forces within "India" who wanted their own country.
They consisted of very different areas with different ethnicities, religions, social traditions and racial groups. ...


You said it right! The colonizers divide and parted their colony based on ethnicities, religions etc etc. Pure divide and conquer. Brits is the father of 'balance od power' sayings of realist school.

http://www.answers.com/topic/partition-of-india

The process of division

British Indian Empire after 1947The actual division between the two new dominions was done according to what has come to be known as the 3rd June Plan or Mountbatten Plan.

The border between India and Pakistan was determined by a British Government-commissioned report usually referred to as the Radcliffe Award after the London lawyer, Sir Cyril Radcliffe, who wrote it. Pakistan came into being with two non-contiguous enclaves, East Pakistan (today Bangladesh) and West Pakistan, separated geographically by India. India was formed out of the majority Hindu regions of the colony, and Pakistan from the majority Muslim areas.

On July 18, 1947, the British Parliament passed the Indian Independence Act that finalized the partition arrangement. The Government of India Act 1935 was adapted to provide a legal framework for the two new dominions.

The 565 Princely States were given a choice of which country to join. Those states whose princes failed to accede to either country or chose a country at odds with their majority religion, such as Junagadh, Hyderabad, and especially Kashmir, became the subject of much dispute.


Expedited, controversial process
The Partition was a highly controversial arrangement, and remains a cause of much tension on the subcontinent today. British Viceroy Louis Mountbatten has not only been accused of rushing the process through, but also is alleged to have influenced the Radcliffe Awards in India's favor.[1]

Some critics allege that British haste led to the cruelties of the Partition [2]. Because independence was declared prior to the actual Partition, it was up to the new governments of India and Pakistan to keep public order. No large population movements were contemplated; the plan called for safeguards for minorities on both sides of the new state line. It was an impossible task, at which both states failed. There was a complete breakdown of law and order; many died in riots, massacre, or just from the hardships of their flight to safety. What ensued was one of the largest population movement in recorded history. According to Richard Symonds[3] "at the lowest estimate, half a million people perished and twelve million became homeless".

However, some argue that the British were forced to expedite the Partition by events on the ground.[citation needed] Law and order had broken down many times before Partition, with much bloodshed on both sides. A massive civil war was looming by the time Mountbatten became Viceroy. The only way the British could have maintained law and order would have been through martial law, and that could not have prevented communal violence throughout India, or the inevitable clashes that would come with partition.[citation needed] If Mountbatten had delayed partition and independence any longer, the death toll may have been in the millions. By rushing the process through, some say, Mountbatten saved more lives than were lost in the Partition.[citation needed]


The division made within British rule! Keep India and Pakistan divided and drag these 2 into prolonged, no-end war, which will be good for the former colonial master. Nasty!

[ Last edited by northwest at 2007-1-20 09:29 PM ]
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Post time 2007-1-20 21:42:23 |Display all floors
Originally posted by emucentral at 2007-1-20 19:36
As to the other things you mentioned, I haven't researched them so I must take you at your word on them. Mind you, if you got them as wrong as Indonesia and India then there's no need to believe you on anything!!!! ...


Yeah, make your research, you encounter a wrong opponent. SE Asia is one of my interest.

See how I make you bleeding in India-Pakistan round. Prepare for more.
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Post time 2007-1-20 21:57:15 |Display all floors
Originally posted by emucentral at 2007-1-20 19:36
East Timor was never part of Indonesia?!.
As to the other things you mentioned, I haven't researched them so I must take you at your word on them. Mind you, if you got them as wrong as Indonesia and India then there's no need to believe you on anything!!!! ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Timor

The Portuguese were the first Europeans to colonise South-East Asia when they arrived in the sixteenth century. They established outposts in Timor as well as in several of the surrounding islands. However, during the House of Habsburg's rule over Portugal, all the surrounding outposts were lost and eventually came under Dutch control by the mid seventeenth century. The area became a colony in 1702 with the arrival of the first governor from Lisbon. In the eighteenth century, the Netherlands gained a foothold on the Western half of the island, and was formally given West Timor in 1859 through the Treaty of Lisbon. The definitive border was established by the Hague Treaty of 1916, and it remains the international boundary between the successor states East Timor and Indonesia.

In late 1941, Portuguese Timor was briefly occupied by Dutch and Australian troops in an attempt to pre-empt a Japanese invasion of the island. The Portuguese Governor protested the invasion, and the Dutch forces returned to the Dutch side of the island. When the Japanese landed and drove the small Australian force out of Dili, the mountainous interior became the scene of a guerrilla campaign, known as the Battle of Timor, waged by Allied forces and Timorese volunteers against the Japanese. The struggle resulted in the deaths of between 40,000 and 70,000 Timorese. Following the end of the war, Portuguese control was reinstated.

The process of decolonisation in Portuguese Timor began in 1974, following the change of government in Portugal in the wake of the Carnation Revolution. Owing to political instability and more pressing concerns over the decolonisation of Angola and Mozambique, Portugal effectively abandoned East Timor and it unilaterally declared itself independent on November 28, 1975. Nine days later, it was invaded and occupied by Indonesian forces before the declaration could be internationally recognised.

Indonesian occupation
Indonesia alleged that the popular East Timorese FRETILIN party, which received some vocal support from the People's Republic of China, was communist. Fearing a Communist domino effect in Southeast Asia – and in the wake of its lost cause in South Vietnam – the United States, along with its ally Australia, supported the pro-Western Indonesian government's actions despite Portugal being a founding member of NATO.

An Indonesian invasion was launched over the western border on 7 December 1975. The day before the invasion of Dili and subsequent annexation, U.S. President Gerald Ford and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger met President Suharto in Jakarta where Ford made it clear that "[w]e will understand and will not press you on the issue. We understand the problem and the intentions you have." Kissinger added: "It is important that whatever you do succeeds quickly [because] the use of US-made arms could create problems."[1] U.S. arms sales to Indonesia continued under subsequent U.S administrations including that of Bill Clinton, although it did eventually discontinue U.S. support of Suharto's regime. As "Timor Timur", the territory was declared the twenty-seventh province of Indonesia in July 1976. Its nominal status in the UN remained that of a "non-self-governing territory under Portuguese administration."

The East Timorese guerrilla force, Falintil, fought a campaign against the Indonesian forces from 1975 to 1999.

Demonstration for independence from Indonesia.Indonesian rule in East Timor was often marked by extreme violence and brutality, such as the Dili massacre and the Liquiçá Church Massacre. In addition, subsistence agriculture, food, and medical supplies were deliberately obstructed,[citation needed] resulting in heavy excess mortality. From 1975 until 1993, attacks on civilian populations were only nominally reported in the Western press. Death tolls reported during the occupation varied from 60,000 to 200,000 [3]. A detailed statistical report prepared for the Commission for Reception, Truth and Reconciliation in East Timor cited a lower range of 102,800 conflict-related deaths in the period 1974-1999, namely, approximately 18,600 killings and 84,200 'excess' deaths from hunger and illness.[4] Since each data source used under-reports actual deaths, this is considered a minimum. Amnesty International estimated deaths at 200,000 [5].


[edit] Independence
Following a UN-sponsored agreement between Indonesia, Portugal and the United States and a surprise decision by the Indonesian President B. J. Habibie, a UN-supervised popular referendum was held on August 30, 1999. The East Timorese voted for full independence from Indonesia, but violent clashes, instigated primarily by the Indonesian military (see Scorched Earth Operation) and aided by Timorese pro-Indonesia militias, led by Eurico Guiterres, broke out soon afterwards. A peacekeeping force (INTERFET, led by Australia) intervened to restore order. Militias fled across the border into Indonesia, from which they attempted sporadic armed raids, particularly along the southern half of the main border held by the New Zealand Army. As these raids were repelled and international moral opinion forced Indonesia to withdraw tacit support, the militias dispersed. INTERFET was replaced by a UN force of International Police, the mission became known as UNTAET, and the UNTAET Crime Scene Detachment was formed to investigate alleged atrocities. The result of these actions caused Osama Bin Laden to place a fatwa on Australia and Australian interests. [6] [7] [8] [9] [10]

Following a visit by Xanana Gusmão to Lisbon, Portugal agreed to recognise East Timor's independence on May 20, 2002. On September 27, East Timor joined the United Nations.


So... you supported Indonesia to annex Timor, for oil. Then you support Timorese independence also for oil.
You still claim Timor never part of Indonesia?! Your government supported Indonesia invasion to Timor and reap handsome oil benefit from it, you have zero moral ground to make such statement.

Anymore to say? I may just provide you some facts you never knew.

[ Last edited by northwest at 2007-1-21 01:08 AM ]
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Post time 2007-1-20 22:00:11 |Display all floors

bull sh!t

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