Author: zyworkshop

请教:中国特色的东西“上有政策,下有对策” [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2005-2-7 14:38:16 |Display all floors

a machine translation

上有政策,下有对策
The higher have policies while the lower own ways of getting around them

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2005-2-7 16:21:41 |Display all floors

Legislation VS Circumvention.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2005-2-7 17:11:36 |Display all floors

fyi

上有政策,下有对策.

One Chinese saying goes that policies always can not be carried out with their original intention or purpose.

Use magic tools Report

rovi297 has been deleted
Post time 2005-2-8 04:13:51 |Display all floors

I reckon coolmax's version sounds much better than.....

Reminder: Author is prohibited or removed, and content is automatically blocked

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2005-2-8 09:45:53 |Display all floors

the policies are not hacked for loopholes but reinterpreted and circumvented

first the word "hacker." if i didn't misunderstand, here, the phrase "a policy hacker" means a person who rewards himself with finding loopholes in the existing policies (cf. a hacker in the cyberspace). in the movie "the firm," there was a conversation between mitch Mcdeer and his mentor: "...you walk towards the edge of the law as far as you can without breaking it." that is probably the "best" a policy hacker could do.

on the other hand, the machine translator gives a quite authentic (but less neatly expressed) interpretation: the higher have policies while the low own ways of getting around them. here, note the formal(?) interpretation of "对策" is "getting around" which is passive and gives an emphasis on the intention of reinterpreting policies rather than actively seeking for loopholes from within.

"where there is a policy, there is a policy hacker" is a neat way to say “上有政策,下有对策”. however, it also hacks (intentionally misinterprets?) this very chinese saying to make "the low" sound more likely to be active loophole finders rather than passive reinterpreters of the policies passed down from "the high."

i think it would be sufficient to say: "often enough, policies suffer the fallacy of being reinterpreted and circumvented." i care less about if it is a neat, poetic expression.

Use magic tools Report

rovi297 has been deleted
Post time 2005-2-8 10:31:36 |Display all floors

I have to disagree

Reminder: Author is prohibited or removed, and content is automatically blocked

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2005-2-8 12:19:19 |Display all floors

often enough, policies suffer being reinterpreted and circumvented

rovi, you are right, fallacy is a misused word. it should not be there. "often enough, policies suffer being reinterpreted and circumvented" looks better.

as for the word hacker, it is often used as a lable for those who search for network loopholes and crack. the cyber-hackers/crackers do the unlawful things. this is very different from a 下级 trying to block certain parts of a policy from being executed. while a hacker/cracker's business is to find unkown loopholes, the 下级 knows exactly where his target is. he needs to reinterpret the policy and he always makes sure his 上级 is not mad about his alteration. sometimes he can even make his reinterpretation a legal addition to the existing policy as a result of compromisation. "有对策" implies that all will eventually be lawful.

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.