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China's Ghost Festival, a day to honor ancestors [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2018-8-25 13:59:18 |Display all floors
China's Ghost Festival, called Zhongyuan Festival by Taoists and Ullambana Festival by Buddhists, falls on the 15th day of the 7th month on the Chinese lunar calendar, which falls on August 25 this year on the Gregorian calendar.
According to ancient tradition, on this day the gates of hell are said to open, and all the ghosts roam the earth and visit the living.
Over the past few thousand years, various folk customs have developed in relation to honoring ghosts and spirits, which can include the souls of ancestors, relatives, and friends. (From China Plus)

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Locals burn incense and paper on a riverbank in Liuzhou, Guangxin Province to honor the deceased on September 4, 2017. [File Photo: VCG]


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Post time 2018-8-25 14:00:47 |Display all floors
Ancestor worship remains a key part of the festival.

Family members offer sacrifices to their deceased ancestors and relatives, preparing offerings of food and drink and burning incense. Many people also burn paper pictures of money along with things like paper villas, cars, clothes – even iPhones. The belief is that these paper-mache items can be used by the ghosts in the afterlife.

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Devotees burn traditional Chinese paper statues during an event to mark the Ghost Festival in Hong Kong on Wednesday, August 22, 2018. [File Photo: VCG]



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Post time 2018-8-25 14:01:31 |Display all floors
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A man prays during a ceremony held at a Buddhist temple to honor the Ullambana Festival, known as China's Ghost Festival, in Beijing on Friday, August 17, 2018. [File Photo: VCG]



As well as paying respects to their own ancestors, people also pay respects to unknown wandering ghosts to avoid being harmed or cursed by them, or as a sign of compassion for these homeless souls.
There are some taboos associated with the festival. On that day, people are supposed to avoid swimming, and going for late-night strolls, in order to avoid being cursed by wandering ghosts.


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Post time 2018-8-25 14:02:31 |Display all floors
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People float water lanterns during celebrations for Zhongyuan Festival, also known as the Ghost Festival, in Nantong, Jiangsu Province on August 17, 2016. [File Photo: VCG]


The festival remains a religious observance for both Buddhists and Taoists, who conduct special ceremonies to help relieve their ghosts from their suffering. They do this by preparing altars, chanting scriptures, and giving offerings.
But among all of the customs associated with the festival, perhaps the most magnificent is the floating of water lanterns.


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Also called lotus lanterns, the lanterns are commonly made by pasting paper into a lotus shape, with a lamp or candle placed inside.

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On the evening of the festival, people light their lanterns, and set them afloat in rivers, lakes, or on the sea. In traditional Chinese culture, lanterns floating on waters are said to be a guide to help lost ghosts and spirits.
Similar celebrations are held across Asia by people with similar traditions.

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Post time 2018-8-25 14:05:42 |Display all floors
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Men dressed in yukata - the traditional summer kimono - perform the Bon-Odori dance during the Tamba-Sasayama Dekansho Festival on August 15, 2016 in Sasayama, Japan. [File Photo: VCG]

In Japan, Obon Festival is widely regarded as the Japanese version of China's Ghost Festival. Activities held on the day include floating lanterns, and performing the traditional Japanese Bon-Odori dance.






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