Views: 2301|Replies: 6

How much should you pay an Intern? [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2016-11-22 09:03:59 |Display all floors
image.jpg

Start at 7:30 a.m., finish at 6:30 p.m. with an hour break at lunch: this was the schedule 240 second-year students at Shaanxi College of Communication Technology were faced with when interning at Yunda Express, a delivery company in the northwestern Chinese city of Xi"an.
And their pay? 10 yuan, or just 1.50 US dollars, per day.
The students, all specializing in road transportation and management, were required to do this internship to earn credits as part of their course.
But they started suspecting they may be employed as cheap labor instead of as interns: from November 12 to 24, the internship coincided with the heavy delivery period that always follows China"s Singles" Day on November 11, when the Chinese embark on an online shopping frenzy.
Earning less than permanent staff members" daily wage of 14 yuan (about two US dollars), the students however had no choice but to work in order to get their final credits.
Student Xiao Gao, using an assumed name, told China Central Television (CCTV) that their work was to sort out parcels ahead of delivery, which was completely irrelevant to his course of study. When questioned about the significance of this job, he said wryly: “It is of great significance because I know how my parcel is broken.”
image (1).jpg

Since this grim internship was exposed on social media, netizens have speculated about the college’s motives.
“Obviously, the college has gray income and then pushes its students out to labor,” commented @Shanika_Tao.

“Enterprises collude with universities to buy cheap laborers. That college is not the only one,” said @Aixizaodemaoyu.

Weibo user @Poker-FaceQi recounted his own experience: “I majored in e-commerce. When it came to graduation year, we were assigned to an assembly line. Ten yuan per day and we also had a night shift. We got five yuan more for that shift. Finally, the whole department spoke up against the university’s arrangement but the university threatened not to give us our diplomas. We fought back, saying we would inform the local education department. Eventually, we didn’t need to continue to work.”
According to China’s regulation on student internships, employers are not allowed to make interns work overtime or on holidays, and universities or colleges have to submit an application to the education department. The regulations also say that payment should not be less than 80 percent of what a staff member gets during the probation period, meaning the students at Yunda Express should have been paid at least 11.20 yuan per day.
Following the outcry, Shaanxi College of Communication Technology said the internship was part of its syllabus but that it may be sensitive during peak sales season, and admitting it was wrong not to inform the education department.

If you have had similar experience, how did you deal with it? Tell us your solutions and your opinions on the college’s arrangement.(news from CCTV news)

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2016-11-23 13:24:43 |Display all floors
such internships should not be a requirement for receiving your degree.
it is no more than bonded labour, exploiting the students.
how much does the university benefit from providing cheap labour to businesses?
there is clearly money changing hands between business and university.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2016-11-23 13:47:50 |Display all floors
I most countries Internships are part of the CV to get a college or university degree. However it should related and relevant to the student's degree and the college board and university should pay attention for that. It is a good system to allow students to get real on the job experience if not abused like in the above shown cases.
I have always treated my interns with great respect and paid them according law and even a bonus if they did  exceptional work.
Always treat people well.

Use magic tools Report

2018 Most Popular Member 2018 Most Popular Member 2016 Most Popular Member Medal Gold Medal

Post time 2016-11-23 20:58:38 |Display all floors
Reminder: Author is prohibited or removed, and content is automatically blocked

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2016-11-24 20:14:38 |Display all floors
less and less recently ..

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2016-11-24 21:50:56 |Display all floors
the same as US President elect. USD 1/-.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2016-11-25 08:42:01 |Display all floors
This is execrable. One would think other countries do it to our young. As an example, students of the hospitality and culinary sciences at some of France's schools for these courses make their interns from China work in french hotels and other places for long-hours and negligible wages. Sheer exploitation of the children of parents who have paid obscene sums for their children's education provided by window-dressed foreign institutions with puffed-up certificates magnified in reputation by crony media.

When the children saw a Chinese man walking in, some of them secretly ran up to him and with tears in their eyes begged to be helped out; they said they were being exploited and did not have enough rest or have enough wages to even buy their own food.

Why are our Chinese folks so stupid, forever exploited every century? Even the tourists these days are fleeced by pickpockets and thieves in Rome whose denizens must still be paying for their debts to Hannibal's descendants.

Perhaps, by way of consolation, the Brits had also done the same to the equally stupid locals in India whose citizens were made to take pride to call their colonial masters 'Sir'.

Which as you already know stands for Slave I Remain.

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.