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World Economic Forum: Best countries in the world     [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2015-5-14 17:25:52 |Display all floors
The best countries in the world:
1) Finland
2) Norway
3) Switzerland
4) Canada
5) Japan
6) Sweden
7) Denmark
8) Netherland
9) New Zealand
10) Belgium

17) United States
64) China

Yet another example why China and the world should not imitate United States. The message is clear, the model how Nordic Contries are run is the best. Put money on education (education and healthcare should not be businesses), level the income gaps, take care of all the citizens, take care of the environment and the government is for the people, not the otherway around.

Stop waisting money on aircraft carriers, nuclear weapons and space programs.

Read the full report from World Economic Forum website.

About The Human Capital Index:

Introduction

A nation’s human capital endowment—the skills and capacities that reside in people and that are put to productive use—can be a more important determinant of its long term economic success than virtually any other resource. This resource must be invested in and leveraged efficiently in order for it to generate returns—for the individuals involved as well as an economy as a whole.

The first edition of the World Economic Forum’s Human Capital Report explored the factors contributing to the development of a healthy, educated and productive labour force. This second, revised edition attempts to deepen the analysis by focusing on a number of key issues that the first edition brought to the fore and that can support better design of education policy and improved workforce planning.

Currently, more than 200 million people globally are out of a job, with youth hit particularly hard. Yet, a focus on unemployment rates alone provides an incomplete outlook on a nation’s success in utilizing its human capital endowment. A more inclusive metric of human capital outcomes would need to take stock of all those—including youth, women and older workers—who have the desire and potential to contribute their capabilities, skills and experience for their own well-being as well as that of economy and society as a whole. Such a metric would also need to assess the education and skills of both the active and inactive population. Above all, as today’s economies become ever more knowledge-based, technology-driven and globalized, and because we simply don’t know what the jobs of tomorrow will look like, there is a growing recognition that we have to prepare the next generation with the capacity for lifelong learning.

The Human Capital Index seeks to serve as a tool for capturing the complexity of education and workforce dynamics so that various stakeholders are able to take better-informed decisions. Because human capital is critical not only to the productivity of society but also the functioning of its political, social and civic institutions, understanding its current state and capacity is valuable to a wide variety of stakeholders.

The Human Capital Index provides country rankings that allow for effective comparisons across regions and income groups. The methodology behind the rankings is intended to serve as a basis for time-series analysis that allows countries to track progress, relative to their own performance as well as that of others. As a vital support to the Index, the Country Profiles included in this Reportprovide a visual representation of countries’ demographic and labour force structure—calling attention to population dynamics such as youth bulges, ageing populations and shrinking workforces—as well as a wealth of information on countries’ human capital composition and contextual variables pointing to critical areas for urgent and longer-term investments.

In pointing to the education and employment outcome gaps, demographic trends and untapped talent pools, it is our hope that this Report can help governments, businesses, education providers and civil society institutions identify key areas for focus and investment. All of these entities have a stake in human capital development, whether their primary goal is to power their businesses, strengthen their communities, or create a population that is better able to contribute to and share in the rewards of growth and prosperity. We thus hope that this Report will also help foster public-private collaboration between sectors, ultimately reframing the debate around employment, skills and human capital from today’s focus on problems and challenges towards the opportunities for collaboration that fully leveraging the human capital potential residing in people’s skills and capacities can bring.


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Post time 2015-5-15 00:09:23 |Display all floors
Congratulations to Finland!

Yet another example why China and the world should not imitate United States. The message is clear, the model how Nordic Contries are run is the best. Put money on education (education and healthcare should not be businesses), level the income gaps, take care of all the citizens, take care of the environment and the government is for the people, not the otherway around.


Right on!

China should never imitate the U.S.A. and waste its resources on useless weapons and stupid wars. China only need to build a small military-industrial complex focused on high-tech industries whose spill-over applications could benefit the commercial sector.

I agree with the conclusions of the report:

Because human capital is critical not only to the productivity of society but also the functioning of its political, social and civic institutions, understanding its current state and capacity is valuable to a wide variety of stakeholders.

As a developing country, China has invested much of its resources on building the infrastructure or "hardware" of the country. But "hardware" is not enough, the "software" -- human capital -- is equally if not more important to the productivity of society, the efficiency of its economy and the effectiveness of its government in building up the national wealth of Socialist China for the benefit of its people.

That's the China Dream.


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Post time 2015-5-15 08:05:02 |Display all floors
While it is true that some countries spend money more wisely than others, the argument is specious. These prosperous countries are allowed to remain like they are, because

1) They are predominantly white,
2) they do spend on defence and technology, a little individually and a little collectively through associations with others or through deals struck with more than one to remain 'neutral'.

What happened to countries in the Indian sub-continent  and China many centuries ago when it was the wealthiest and most prosperous, but did not spend or plan enough for military strength is well known. it is many centuries and they still have not recovered.
Peace is never achieved by unilateral disarmament. That logic is total hogwash. Peace AND prosperity can be stable only when there is a good balance of opposing or atleast mutally deterring forces.

Using some ranking to make a case for a nonsensical, impractical and ideal scenario goes to show just how brainwashed some are. Even now, one can see how the 'neutral' Swiss or Finns are being pulled or pushed into siding with a hegemon and its policies for world domination.
If people and countries left each other alone in peace to become do what they want without infringing on others, all countries would be prosperous. It does not seem to be in human nature to do so.
My friend the Black Swan

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Post time 2015-5-15 09:11:30 |Display all floors
KIyer Post time: 2015-5-15 02:05
While it is true that some countries spend money more wisely than others, the argument is specious.  ...

Where are the Swiss and Finns being pulled and by whom?

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Post time 2015-5-15 09:27:18 |Display all floors
This post was edited by KIyer at 2015-5-15 11:27
mixamixa Post time: 2015-5-15 11:11
Where are the Swiss and Finns being pulled and by whom?

If you are that much unaware or naive you lend more credence to my statement.  Are you even minimally aware of the world around you or do you simply look up some surveys?.  I  can of course spell it out for you,  but how about you have a go yourself and figure this one out for yourself.
My friend the Black Swan

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Post time 2015-5-15 13:47:49 |Display all floors
Best country according to whom? Even in countries like Denmark, there are dark sides of the culture there. For example, you're not allowed to stand out. If you buy a brand new luxury car and show it off in Denmark, you can expect people to vandalize it. It's part of the culture there that says everyone is equal, you are not special. I have heard about Americans who have gone there who couldn't stand the typical Danish attitude, where they think they have the best of everything. The Americans think that the Danes are automatons. There are Danes who have moved out, too.

Japan is a clean country, but I wouldn't want to live there either. It is too superficial. And there's something sickening about their culture, just look at their porn.

Even though China is number 64 according to your list, I would choose to live in China over those top 10 countries. The most urgent thing I hope Chinese people will tackle is their acceptance and tolerance of violence. You cannot make everyone non-violent, but society should not approve of it when they see it. The people are very important, it doesn't matter how rich the country is, if people think it's okay to beat other people up, just because they're pissed off.

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Post time 2015-5-15 13:51:05 |Display all floors
or for any other reason. Violence is simply unacceptable. It's not just an opinion, but ask anyone decent and see what they say!

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