Author: smuffy

Should foreigners be treated equal?   [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2015-4-26 01:28:28 |Display all floors
This post was edited by BlondeAmber at 2015-4-26 02:10
incarnate Post time: 2015-4-26 00:52
The taxi was waiting for his fare, as it was booked and was informed by its company on its radio t ...

If the driver was waiting for a fare, he could have moved away a small distance or just not engaged with the drunk.
Did the expected fare did not arrive?
Why did the driver 'argue' for 3 hours with the drunk, who probably would have left if he had been ignored?

As many foreigners find, our polite refusal to have our photo taken is often disregarded, not to mention the many times it seems that sometimes people don't even think to ask our permission.
Friends of mine who visited with their young children found, to their distress, that their children were not only photographed without permission, but also touched and picked up by locals (strangers).

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Post time 2015-4-26 02:35:57 |Display all floors
incarnate Post time: 2015-4-26 00:52
The taxi was waiting for his fare, as it was booked and was informed by its company on its radio t ...
You have all the right to refuse if you are asked to have your picture taken.


China only requires consent of a person being photographed in a public place, that is member of the public, if the image is going to be used commercially. Publishing to a non commercial blog or such is permitted and no permission is required to photograph ANY person in a public place.

This is covered under Chinese civil law
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Post time 2015-4-26 05:49:45 |Display all floors
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Post time 2015-4-26 08:43:17 |Display all floors
incarnate Post time: 2015-4-26 05:49
Thank you for the info. Greatly appreciated. In this case, while legality is one's right, courtesy ...

Courtesy doesn't enter the legal framework.

Photographic permissions vary from country to country, though most require permission from the subject if the shot is to be used commercially.  Most countries allow for the photography of the individual without consent for private use (it varies) and providing the shot is in a public location. Some exceptions are Japan, Brasil, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Switzerland, France and the UK in certain circumstances.  No permission is required in the USA and for commercial use it varies by state.  Canada is still sorting out it's national stance in the courts I believe.

One final thing, the press has a right to use photographs/video of anyone in a public location providing the story is deemed "in the public interest".  This only applies to traditional media, not to the kid down the street running a news clipping service and posing as a wannabe press professional.
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Post time 2015-4-26 09:33:33 |Display all floors
If this case is true then the Laowai was out of order but I must question the following:-

1, if the driver had a prebooked fare why had that person not turned up in 3 hours?
2, why did it take 3 hours for the police to be called?
3, why did the police seemining side with the laowai telling the driver to take him anyway?

All people should be treated equally but this is a two way street, I have had numerous taxi drivers in China refusing to use the meter on a trip but this never seems to happen when my Chinese wife is with me.

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Post time 2015-4-26 09:47:29 |Display all floors
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Post time 2015-4-26 10:04:40 |Display all floors
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