Author: moonshooter

What has wars brought to us? [Copy link] 中文

Post time 2014-7-20 16:40:07 |Display all floors
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Post time 2014-7-20 17:58:27 |Display all floors
gooddog Post time: 2014-7-20 09:40
Wars have brought destruction, starvation, massive loss of humanity, and wealth and power to the eli ...

Civil victim, 90 years later
Maité Roël was also eight years old when, on 6 July 1992, she was sitting with her friends around a campfire of the naval scouts in the military zone in Wetteren. There was an explosion, and everyone started shouting and running around. But Maité couldn't get up. She looked down and saw that her left leg was hanging by a piece of skin.

The screaming child was rushed by air to Ghent University Hospital. Surgeons took skin, muscles and arteries from her thighs, back and ribs to reconstruct her leg. Eventually, after 29 operations that involved Maité spending two years in hospital, heavily sedated on morphine, surgeons managed to save her leg. Today she is recognised as a civil victim of the First World War. She even holds a First World War veteran's card ("mutilated in the war"), and when she shows it to gain reduced fare on the railway, ticket inspectors suspect she's stolen it from a dead ancestor.

http://www.flanderstoday.eu/living/iron-harvest
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Post time 2014-7-20 18:00:02 |Display all floors

1 Dec '10

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The iron harvest
by a a,
Recent articles: Thoroughbred accord, Strike at Brussels Airlines averted, The week in business (18/09/2013)
Summary

The discovery of an unexploded Second World War bomb on 16 November at the construction site of the new NATO headquarters in Brussels was reported worldwide. Newspapers from Washington to Seoul carried reports of the 250-kilogram American bomb and the evacuation of the current NATO building.
The discovery of an unexploded bomb in Brussels is a timely reminder that, in other parts of Flanders, such finds are a daily occurrence
The discovery of an unexploded Second World War bomb on 16 November at the construction site of the new NATO headquarters in Brussels was reported worldwide. Newspapers from Washington to Seoul carried reports of the 250-kilogram American bomb and the evacuation of the current NATO building.
© Yves Logghe/REPORTERS

© Yves Logghe/REPORTERS

Meanwhile, in the Westhoek of West Flanders - scene of some of the most severe battles of the First World War - the locals must have been wondering what all the fuss was about, because such discoveries in their region are far from newsworthy.

Members of the local bomb disposal squad might have been caught smiling ruefully, too. In 2009, they were called out no fewer than 3,027 times - that's more than eight times a day - to pick up unexploded ordnance from the First World War. These call-outs resulted in the disposal of 215 tons of unexploded bombs, shells, mortars, grenades and gas canisters.

Yet the timing of the discovery of the NATO bomb couldn't have been more apposite. Only five days previously, the 11 November lecture of the Flemish Peace Institute was held in Saint Jacob's Church in Ypres. This annual event is jointly organised with the In Flanders Fields Museum.

The keynote speech this year was delivered by Flemish author Erwin Mortier. His prize-winning 2008 novel Godenslaap (Sleeping Gods) was reviewed in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung: "This book depicts daily life during the First World War in such an impressive way that it seems as if Mortier has experienced the war himself."

In some respects, he had. When he was eight, he was playing toy soldiers with a friend on local waste ground; the game involved excavating mini- trenches and tunnels. "As we were digging deep inside a mound of earth, our fingers came across something hard and domed which felt granular and gave a dull metallic sound when we knocked on it."

The two boys forgot about their game and started digging for buried treasure. Eventually they pulled out two soldier's helmets, rust-coloured through corrosion, one with a perfectly round hole in it. The boys took their finds to Mortier's father, who promptly forbade them to play in the heap of earth: "He said we were lucky, not because of our treasure trove but because our fingers had encountered a couple of helmets, and not anything far worse than that," Mortier recalls.

Discoveries in the Flemish soil that could be "far worse" were also touched on by Luc Dehaene, mayor of Ypres, at the 11 November lecture. He spoke of someone who was not so fortunate as Mortier and his friend.

Civil victim, 90 years later
Maité Roël was also eight years old when, on 6 July 1992, she was sitting with her friends around a campfire of the naval scouts in the military zone in Wetteren. There was an explosion, and everyone started shouting and running around. But Maité couldn't get up. She looked down and saw that her left leg was hanging by a piece of skin.

The screaming child was rushed by air to Ghent University Hospital. Surgeons took skin, muscles and arteries from her thighs, back and ribs to reconstruct her leg. Eventually, after 29 operations that involved Maité spending two years in hospital, heavily sedated on morphine, surgeons managed to save her leg. Today she is recognised as a civil victim of the First World War. She even holds a First World War veteran's card ("mutilated in the war"), and when she shows it to gain reduced fare on the railway, ticket inspectors suspect she's stolen it from a dead ancestor.

It appears that one of the scouts had picked up an unexploded shell, thinking it was a mouldy log, and tossed it into the fire. Studying the shrapnel revealed it was an RAF bomb, dropped on the fleeing Germans in 1918. Ironically, Maité is partly British; her grandmother is a Scot who lives in Ostend.

Unfortunately, Maité's story is far from unique. Children playing in Flanders fields, or even in their gardens, frequently unearth war-time relics. Some, like Erwin Mortier, are lucky. They find harmless items such as coins, buckles, cutlery, buttons, belts and gasmask filters. Others, like Maité Roël, find items much more dangerous, sometimes with horrific consequences.

"In the district of Ypres, 599 people have died as a result of deadly ammunition that was left behind after the Armistice," says Dehaene. "The last victim died just two years ago, and nobody dares to say that this is finally the end."

The iron harvest
Local farmers also plough out unexploded shells every season. It's known as "The Iron Harvest". The source is the approximately 720 million shells and mortars that were fired on the western front between 1914 and 1918. Their reliability was so poor that it is estimated that at least a quarter of them did not explode at the time.

Many were recovered after the war, but experts estimate there may still be as many as 30 million shells lying in the earth along the front line. One in 20 contains poisonous gases that are still potent enough to kill.
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Post time 2014-7-21 01:54:19 |Display all floors
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Post time 2014-7-21 10:46:10 |Display all floors
LCSULLA Post time: 2014-7-19 00:15
An Edwinn Starr Hit Song, that's for sure.

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Post time 2014-7-21 10:51:33 |Display all floors
dusty1 Post time: 2014-7-20 15:39
Medical advances, communication advances, aircraft, vehicals technology, metal urgy, new materials.  ...

better do not have these advances if the sacrifice was starting a war.

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Post time 2014-7-21 14:00:37 |Display all floors
moonshooter Post time: 2014-7-21 10:51
better do not have these advances if the sacrifice was starting a war.

w.e.s.t. wars = these are what they get from wars~


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