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Are Chinese housemaids 保姆 reliable?

Popularity 5Viewed 6449 times 2016-5-27 16:03 |Personal category:Inspiration|System category:Life| 保姆


One of my Chinese friends recruited a housemaid - Bao Mu (保姆) to take care of her septuagenarian father who lives far from her place. China has a huge old generation who needs helpers in their old age. Their family members are engaged away for their own reason, also all the time family members can’t manage time to care them.

 

She has changed many Bao Mu within a year because she blames they all not worked properly with their kind heart. The latest Bao Mu is comparatively better but still Bao Mu seems money oriented rather than helping from her heart.

Then,

Should BaoMu conducted with moral education while on the duty?

How should they are guided or trained in China?

Can bao mu be devoted in service being as a family member?

Can we rely on bao mu’s duty without observation?

What are the rules and system in China to apply the baomu job?

Should this job applied as a social /humanitarian service?   


(Opinions of the writer in this blog don't represent those of China Daily.)


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Reply Report Judy_Zhu 2016-5-27 22:16
Hi, Caishen, this is a very important topic, and here are my opinions for you.
Firstly, I think every professional job should be defined and standardized by certain rules and laws rather than moral education. Family members will be caring and responsible for their own elders out of moral aspect, while other people working in this field should be controlled in a system to make sure mutual sides are happily living.
Secondly, Baomu, as a profession, especially for the elderly, is acctually very demanding job. I think normal people without special training and a certificate in this field are not qualified for taking care of of an old person not capable of taking care of themselves. So nurses and social workers are the first choice.
If we have such a system and such qualified workers, we can rely on them without keeping an eye all day long on them. Mutual trust is essential for a harmony employment. While the current predicament is that both of them are in shortage.
It's really a pity, but it deserves effort.
Reply Report luckyann 2016-5-28 10:38
'Can bao mu be devoted in service being as a family member?'

I'd like to show my opinions about this question.

I don't think housemaid can be devoted in service being as an family member all the time but in their work time.You know as a household service for housemaids is only a work among all kinds of works, also they should have weekend time to relax, not keep them working all day and night.So we should not just relay on housemaid's  duty without observation.

For sure, Maomu job is a litle special, some rules and systerm should be applied by governments.
Reply Report 财神 2016-5-28 14:35
Judy_Zhu: Hi, Caishen, this is a very important topic, and here are my opinions for you.
Firstly, I think every professional job should be defined and standardi ...
I am thankful for your words. I found that there are training centers for Bao mu but not sure what type of authentication they receive. If any trained bao mu applies for the job, obviously wage demand could be high and works for money not for social service. Such types of slackers don’t serve from core of their heart and just kill the time for salary, then…?  
Reply Report 财神 2016-5-28 14:41
luckyann: 'Can bao mu be devoted in service being as a family member?'

I'd like to show my opinions about this question.

I don't think housemaid can be devot ...
For an example, My Chinese sister’s bao mu looks lazy, even some daily necessities are remained undone. She doesn’t want to go outside taking the old man, just wants to seated on the sofa and watch the T.V. what’s the cure for her? Is there any medicine to motivate for her duty? Or just shout at her?   
Reply Report luckyann 2016-5-28 19:33
财神: For an example, My Chinese sister’s bao mu looks lazy, even some daily necessities are remained undone. She doesn’t want to go outside taking the ol ...
Just shouting at her? that doesn't work.

You know looking after an old man who is unable to do anything all day and night is a hard work. If she just works 8 hours a day  just like common workers it might be better.
Reply Report 财神 2016-5-28 22:13
luckyann: Just shouting at her? that doesn't work.

You know looking after an old man who is unable to do anything all day and night is a hard work. If she just ...
Yeah...you are right.shouting isnt reckoned as a good manner. She is wholetimer bao mu but she seems lazy on working properly...this type of service must come out from servants heart.
Reply Report BlondeAmber 2016-5-29 00:34
Do the carers have any medical training?
Would they know what to do if the older person needed First Aid?

Without any basic training in care of others, do people just go for the cheapest option?

The carer (Bao Mu) is not a servant and if this is how you treat the person, then you are not going to get the care you want.
You are expecting a non-family member to do all the unpleasant and maybe personal and intimate hygiene tasks that you are not prepared to do yourself, so think of exactly what you expect the Bao Mu to do.
If you treat the Bao Mu as an inferior, and not with respect because you are expecting this person to do the work you are not prepared to do for whatever reason, you will not get the service you paid for.

Likewise if the Bao Mu is someone who is only concerned about money and not the job, then they don't have the interests of the elderly relation as their prime concern.
Reply Report AndrewCraven 2016-5-31 09:34
Baomu in China, in my eyes, especially for looking after the elderly doesn't need special training. Being able to make meals three time a day and helping the elderly remembering to have medicine are enough. Of course, they do the job because of money, or else who would like to do that? Don't you see they are middle- aged? will a young labour do that? I don't think so.
Reply Report BlondeAmber 2016-5-31 15:45
AndrewCraven: Baomu in China, in my eyes, especially for looking after the elderly doesn't need special training. Being able to make meals three time a day and help ...
I would never leave an elderly relative (or anyone), in the care of someone who had no medical training, especially if they were expected to feed and care for the old person and the old person was taking any medicine.

how would such a person manage if the elderly person was choking or required immediate emergency attention?
thankfully at home such people are required to be licenced and have a certain minimum standard of training before they can work or I as an employer, and the Baomu could face criminal charges should the old person come to harm.

Many of the Baomu, or carers, especially in family homes, are younger people (usually not younger than 30), with a minimum knowledge of First Aid and specialist elderly care, and it is something that they WANT to do, not only for the money.

Anyone who is only motivated by money won't care that much for doing a good job.

Thankfully there are people in the world who understand that there are more important things than money.
Teachers are the same - the good teachers would not be a teacher if they did not care about their students.
Reply Report AndrewCraven 2016-5-31 19:09
BlondeAmber: I would never leave an elderly relative (or anyone), in the care of someone who had no medical training, especially if they were expected to feed and  ...
yes with  knowledge of First Aid and medicine care, the carers should get trained.  That happens in metropolises, not in third tier cities, let alone rural areas.

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