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Filial Piety and the Role in Chinese Life ………. ? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2012-9-9 02:29:51 |Display all floors
This post was edited by expatter at 2012-9-9 13:38

Filial piety was an idea that was first presented to me in China. It is the way that Chinese for centuries have adopted Confuciusnist values to a whole society and still practice this today. I suppose in a nutshell it is the idea that whilst the West adopted to a God and a religion as a source of succor for death and the life thereafter. China adopted a course of the family, obedience to elders and ancestor worship. In the West many place their life and ideals in the hands of a supreme being from a spiritual point of view (even though some declare atheism) whilst in China many or most do the same but for the line of their heirs to ensure immortality. The ancestors or the ones before them are the way to the afterlife. The idea that a family must have a male heir for ancestor worship and immortality to succeed has driven China for many thousands of years and this belief is inherently strong even today. However, in the West the young believe in the exterior idea that individual freedom outweighs the rights of family.


Indeed this even penetrates and morphs into politics in China in the way that the emperor was the father of the whole of society and this could even be reflected in China from the fall of the Qings to the presentday ‘single-party’ structure. This begs the question whether a filial society would even understand the Western God driven structure where the political rules are stronger or outweigh the cultural significance of family first.


Therefore from a Chinese standpoint one must ask whether the family and filial piety are more or less important than politics, and also the position of the young individual towards the shift in Western values?


Will China ever change from a filial society which in a world without a deity is a route to the after-life? Or will China bend towards Western ideals and adopt a God as a replacement?


And the biggest part of this conundrum is that if people did not die then maybe there would be no need for a God or even filial piety ……………    {:soso_e122:}







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Post time 2012-9-9 03:57:09 |Display all floors
Filial piety  ...........

Does it make China different ..........     ?


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Post time 2012-9-9 06:04:10 |Display all floors
Life expectancy has soared in China, while fertility has plummeted due to strict birth control policies. In 2009 there were 167 million over-60s, about an eighth of the population. By 2050 there will be 480 million, while the number of young people will have fallen. "It's a timebomb," warned Wang Feng of the Brookings-Tsinghua Centre for Public Policy in Beijing.


Filial piety is going to be put under a lot of pressure.
Your own mind is a sacred enclosure into which nothing harmful can enter except by your permission. Arnold Bennett

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Post time 2012-9-9 13:17:51 |Display all floors
St_George Post time: 2012-9-9 06:04
Life expectancy has soared in China, while fertility has plummeted due to strict birth control polic ...

I think if the population had been left to soar to 2.6 billion  .............

The whole system would be near collapse now  .........


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Post time 2012-9-9 14:39:48 |Display all floors
expatter Post time: 2012-9-9 13:17
I think if the population had been left to soar to 2.6 billion  .............

The whole system wo ...

Its not straight forward and there are no easy solutions to it but here is a good blog written on the subject:
Your own mind is a sacred enclosure into which nothing harmful can enter except by your permission. Arnold Bennett

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Post time 2012-9-9 14:40:15 |Display all floors
China’s One-Child Policy—Posner

I do think the world has a serious population problem. The world population has reached seven billion and so great a number of people places enormous pressure on the environment; it contributes for example to global warming by increasing carbon emissions as a result of burning more fossil fuel in transportation and electrical generation. But if East Asia the a population problem it is the opposite: shrinking population because of very low fertility rates. The fertility rate (the number of births per woman per year) in Taiwan, apparently the lowest, is only 1—less than half the replacement rate, which is 2.1 In South Korea the ferility rate is 1.1, in Singapore 1.2, in Japan 1.3. Oddly, in China, the only country that actually restricts population growth, the fertility rate is higher—either 1.6, as some sources have it, or 1.4, Becker’s figure—though still below the replacement rate.

If China adhered rigorously to its one-child policy, the fertility rate would be below 1, because not all women have children. So the policy, which in any event as Becker points out makes exceptions for rural families (also for residents of Hong Kong and women who have graduate degrees from foreign universities—a eugenic policy, and Singapore also has encouraged fertility among high IQ couples), must be widely flouted. It is unlikely therefore that abrogating the policy would have a significant effect on birth rates, other than in the short run. There would be a short-run bump because some families who want a second child have been deterred. But the long-run effect might well be nil. The reason is that, as incomes in China rise toward South Korean and Japanese levels, the Chinese birth rate is likely to decline regardless of government policy, offsetting any effects from the abrogation of the one-child policy. As the opportunity costs of having children rise because the value of women’s time in paid work increases, and the expense of children rises as well because of the importance of education, the number of births declines irrespective of government policy.

As Becker points out, the one-child policy distorts the male-female birth ratio, leading to a surplus of males, which is probably a bad thing given the much greater male propensity for criminal behavior; at the same time it portends future reductions in fertility rates. There is also the problem, which all the low-fertility East Asian countries are experiencing, of an increased fraction of retired people. But I doubt that the one-child policy contributes significantly to that problem, because, as I have said, judging from the experience of the countries that are most like China, ending the policy is unlikely to affect China’s overall fertility rate. If this is correct, there really is no justification for this very unpopular policy, and I would therefore expect it to be abandoned, whether formally or simply through nonenforcement.

But I do wish to question whether a fertility rate below the replacement rate should actually be thought problematic. If the current size of the world’s population is excessive, as it may be, implying not only that future population growth is undesirable but that a reduction in population may be desirable, a fertility rate below 2.1 may therefore also be desirable. There are historical examples, of which the most important is medieval Europe. The Black Death, in reducing the European population by a third in a relatively short time, is sometimes credited with Europe’s economic takeoff that gave it world domination, because by substantially increasing the ratio of arable land to people the plague substantially increased incomes, in turn increasing demand for consumer goods, stimulating transportation and urbanization, and facilitating capital formation. A large retired population can act as a stabilizing, pacifying force in a society, whereas a young population, as one observes in many Middle Eastern countries, can be a formula for instability.

Your own mind is a sacred enclosure into which nothing harmful can enter except by your permission. Arnold Bennett

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Post time 2012-9-9 15:38:24 |Display all floors
On the simple definition of filial piety, we had a similar sort of thing in the West in olden times.  The masses were very poor so they had big families.  

The theory being the kids looked after their elders when they were too old to work any more.  No pensions or welfare system at the time, they faced old age in abject poverty.

The 'god' thing and the promised land was something to look forward to because their lives were short and miserable.

We're still nominally 70% Christians but the Churches are two thirds empty-i dont know anybody who goes to Church on Sunday now.  The congregation has shrunk to a small, devout number.

From an economic point of view, filial piety has been somewhat turned on its head-a large number of wealthy home owning older people looking after their kids !

Your own mind is a sacred enclosure into which nothing harmful can enter except by your permission. Arnold Bennett

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