Views: 4086|Replies: 16

3-D or SMART TV dilemma [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 4

Post time 2012-2-22 16:24:32 |Display all floors
Which trend are we heading as most TV manufacturerers are making losses

3D or SMART TV ?

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2012-2-22 16:28:11 |Display all floors
This post was edited by cloudd at 2012-2-22 16:30

November 2, 2011 3:17 pm

Japanese TV manufacturers admit defeatBy Jonathan Soble


Sony and Panasonic, whose TVs dominated the world’s living rooms for much of the analogue era, are shrinking their operations dramatically in an acknowledgment that they have failed to compete in the age of digital flatscreens.
Sony announced on Wednesday that it will halve its medium-term sales target for liquid crystal display TVs to 20m a year, giving up on an ambitious goal it had set only in 2009. That followed Panasonic’s decision on Monday to cut flatscreen panel output by nearly half, to 7.2m a year, and merge or scrap production lines in Japan.

Other Japanese companies are also reconsidering their commitment to TVs. Hitachisaid in July it was looking at outsourcing all its production to foreigncontract manufacturers. Even Sharp,the leading seller of LCD sets in the Japanese market, is converting some ofits domestic production capacity to making smaller screens for smartphones and tablet computers.



Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2012-2-22 16:36:15 |Display all floors
Samsung spinning off its LCD business to focus on OLED
By Jeff Blagdon on February 20, 2012 01:32 am

We knew that Samsung was thinking about spinning off its unprofitable LCD business, and while its disclosure on February 14th stated the company would make a final decision within three months, a new filing shows Samsung is going ahead with its plan. Bloomberg reports the new subsidiary is tentatively named Samsung Display Co., and could be merged with Samsung Mobile Display Co. and the company's recently-acquired 100 percent stake in S-LCD, allowing the company to shift some of its considerable resources from LCD to OLED production. Samsung Mobile Display was set up as a partnership between Samsung and Samsung SDI in 2009, and is the company behind Samsung's OLED displays for smartphones and other mobile devices.
The move follows the 750 billion won operating loss (about $668 million) realized by Samsung's LCD business in 2011. Everyone's having a hard time making money selling LCD TVs, but having seen the 55-inch OLED set in person, we would expect that red ink to start drying up

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2012-2-22 16:37:23 |Display all floors
LG posts improved Q4 net loss thanks to profit from handset and TV divisions
By Tom Warren on February 1, 2012 04:32 am
LG Electronics reported its fourth-quarter 2011 results today. The South Korean company posted a net loss of 111.6 billion won ($97.73 million) during its quarter ended December 31, compared to a 245.7 billion won loss in the same period last year, a clear improvement boosted by its TV and handset divisions. Fourth-quarter sales dropped by 6 percent, but the company posted an operating profit of 23 billion won ($20 billion).
LG's handset division reached 9.9 billion won in operating profit,...
Continue reading »

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2012-2-22 16:41:07 |Display all floors
Japanese leading branch are making lossess...

Sony and Panasonic take debt rating hit, television divisions largely to blame
By Bryan Bishop on January 21, 2012 12:17 pm
Moody's Investors Service has downgraded the debt rating of both Sony and Panasonic, singling out continued losses from their television divisions as a reason for the change. Citing increased competition, declining device prices, and strong performance of the yen, Moody's lowered Sony's rating from A3 down to Baa1, while Panasonic moved from an A1 to an A2 — both with a negative outlook.
The companies have struggled with their TV businesses as of late, with Panasonic recently

Sharp slashing LCD production by half at Osaka plant in response to sagging HDTV market
By Chris Welch on February 1, 2012 02:52 am
While Sharp may have high expectations for the large HDTV (60+ inches) segment, it would seem that the manufacturer is nonetheless feeling the effects of an overall stagnant market. Nikkei reports that Sharp will cut LCD production by half at a plant in Osaka, Japan in response to a downturn in TV demand. That's not to say the affected factory lines will sit idle during the break. Sharp is allegedly considering retooling its facilities to develop higher-resolution displays and improve power...

Hitachi to stop domestic television manufacture in October
By Sam Byford on January 23, 2012 06:41 am
After more than 50 years of business, Hitachi announced that it will move its LCD and plasma television production outside Japan this October, in a further sign that the strong yen and foreign competition are hitting the domestic technology industry hard — particularly TV manufacturers. A spokesman for the company said "We can't expect the domestic TV market to grow much, and price competition is getting more and more intense." The division's employees will transfer from Hitachi Consumer...

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2012-2-22 16:42:37 |Display all floors
Strong TV sales for Samsung, Sharp as Sony struggles
By Chris Welch on December 8, 2011 03:04 pm
It seems Americans are still buying plenty of TVs — TVs that don't carry the name "Sony," anyway. Samsung announced today that the company enjoyed record sales of 5.7 million units in the month of November aided in large part by a massive Thanksgiving holiday weekend that saw consumers besting last year's retail figures by $7.4 billion. That performance keeps Samsung on track to hit its 2011 sales goal of 45 million flat-screen TVs. Additionally, more shoppers are going bigger when it comes...

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 4

Post time 2012-2-22 16:47:58 |Display all floors
Manufacturers Turn to Smart TV After 3-D Disappoints
By EVAN RAMSTAD
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB ... 59783074010902.html

SEOUL—After 3-D TV failed to excite consumers last year, manufacturers are betting that following the app-laden path of smartphones and tablet computers will fatten up what have been ultraslim profit margins.

For more than a decade, consumer-electronics manufacturers have been trying to marry the Internet and TV. In recent years, they've added connectors that let TV sets hook up to the Internet and, in some cases, added software that provides shortcuts to Web-based services from companies like movie-rental service Netflix Inc.
But this year, starting with product announcements at this week's Consumer Electronics Show, manufacturers are making a full-on push with "smart TVs"— models that have built-in computer-style processors and operating software so the sets can be modified with applications just as computers and smartphones are.
The idea is to make it easy to shop, surf the Web, check the weather and traffic and set up customized news pages. Consumers also would have available a variety of other apps for, say, social networking or sharing photos and videos.
Manufacturers risk that their products will be interchangeable, though, and that the real money will go to app developers. And technical challenges remain in the relatively new arena.
"Smart TV is an inevitable trend," says Baeguen Kang, vice president of research and development at South Korea's LG Electronics Co., the world's second-largest seller of TV sets by unit volume. "As people experienced smartphones and tablet PCs, the larger screen on a TV is very attractive for apps and Web content."
Twenty-one percent of the roughly 210 million TV sets sold world-wide last year had an Internet connection, according to DisplaySearch, a research firm based in Santa Clara, Calif. It forecast the portion will rise to more than 50% by 2014.
With no precise definition of a smart TV, manufacturers will be trying to stake out their ideas at the Consumer Electronics Show, which starts Wednesday night in Las Vegas. Most companies are likely to tout connections that allow a TV to connect to a home Wi-Fi network without requiring an Ethernet cable. Many sets also will have a technical interface, known as DLNA, that allows them to screen videos and apps run from computers, smartphones and other gadgets.
Google Inc. last year created a platform for set makers to create smart TVs that run on software it created. But the company last month asked some manufacturers to hold back on product announcements as it refines the software.
Some manufacturers—including South Korea's Samsung Electronics Co., the largest TV-set maker—will unveil smart TVs based on chip sets and operating software of their own design.
Vizio Inc. is trying multiple approaches. On Monday, the Southern California company announced a new Internet service for its TVs called Via Plus, which will incorporate Google TV. Vizio said it is initially starting with two TV models but plans to expand the line. Other TVs include its first-generation Via service, which incorporates Yahoo Widgets, Yahoo Inc.'s software format for Internet content such as news, weather and photo applications.
Manufacturers also are incorporating smart-TV chip sets and operating software into other devices, such as Blu-ray disc players. With the accessory as the brain of the smart-TV system, a consumer can upgrade without buying a new TV set. LG recently announced it would sell a "smart TV upgrader," a box with the processing power and software for Internet access and apps that can be connected to existing TV sets.
For manufacturers, the smart-TV push partly is driven by a need to bolster razor-thin profit margins. Last year's expected profit cushion, TV sets with three-dimensional displays, weren't as popular with consumers as manufacturers hoped. Manufacturers and retailers responded by cutting prices on 3-D sets to move inventory, squeezing profit margins.
But even the premium that manufacturers can get for smart TVs may be short-lived. Internet-connected TV sets last year sold for about $300 more than nonconnected sets with comparably sized screens. But this year, prices for smart TVs, even with wireless and other new capabilities, are likely to fetch a premium of only $200 or so.
TV makers will use the Consumer Electronics Show to meet with software developers to persuade them to develop apps for larger screens than smartphones and tablets, offering to give the developers a cut of the revenue.
The risk for TV manufacturers is that, like PC companies, the TV makers will wind up providing commoditized products while other companies reap profits from software and content. "You can argue the PC makers should have had stronger control of the value of the content that you're using on the device, but they never got a piece of the action," says Paul Semenza, a vice president at DisplaySearch. "It's hard to hold out a whole lot of hope for a different outcome in TVs."
TV-set makers also face several technical hurdles. The most obvious is how to let the consumer control on-screen apps without having to use complex remote controls or keyboards. Mr. Kang, of LG, said gesture technology, similar to that used in Microsoft Corp.'s new Kinect accessory for its Xbox game machine, will appear on some smart TVs this year and become common in coming years. "The combination of gesture and voice recognition will be introduced very soon," he says.
TV manufacturers also are working to reduce the boot-up time associated with the smart part of smart TVs. Consumers are accustomed to TV sets turning on almost instantly and have gotten used to the always-on nature of smartphones.
—Yukari Iwatani Kane contributed to this article.

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.