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Kill Chinese? [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2010-6-1 11:14:22 |Display all floors
I've read an article revealing that a Hollywood movie named Red Dawn, which is expected to be released this November, centered on a group of Midwest teenagers who came together to defend their town and their country from invading Chinese troops. And lines including "kill Chinese" are in the movie.

this movie has reflected the fear among ordinary US citizens who may consider China as an emerging threat and enemy of their country. i feel sad about the film, not only because i'm Chinese, but also because of the ignorance of the US people and their movie industry. at least in Chinese society, we don't have such kind of movie which depicts other nations as evil and enemy. of course, we have historical programs which are about the war history of China and Japan. but that's the true history, not an imaginary story.

the following is from Global Times

China is regarded as a rising power in the eyes of most Western observers. Naturally, rising powers are often thought of as potential enemies and strong opponents.

If one takes a quick glance at the China-oriented books in the US market in the last few decades, the most influential ones are those that describe China as a coming or already existing threat to the US.

From the frequently-discussed article How Do We Fight China: The Next Cold War by Robert Kapman to Bill Gertz's famous The China Threat: How the People's Republic of China Targets America, most mainstream discussions about Sino-US relations show a touch of anxiety.

It is obvious that the growing interest in the US toward China's economic and social development is a mirror reflecting some sort of curiosity and confusion between the two countries.

Generally speaking, communication between the US and China concerns several aspects of relations between the two sides. What people usually see are the strategic and economic dialogues, meetings between high-level government officials, and other official communications.

Nevertheless, a sense of misunderstanding, distrust and even fear can still be seen, especially between the two peoples at a non-governmental level.

There is a generally believed rule when it comes to international relations: If you imagine a country as an enemy, soon it will become one in reality.

The same rule applies to Sino-US relations, which are always complicated.

A movie about the possibility of China invading the US should not cause much concern. What really deserves attention is Americans' lack of understanding of Chinese.
I am a Beijing girl.

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Post time 2010-6-1 11:36:43 |Display all floors

At the Movies in China, Can a Russian Be the Bad Guy?

WSJ

Since when is Russia a dirty word in Chinese? Blockbuster movie sequel “Iron Man 2” is playing to full theatres in China, but it has been bizarrely edited by Chinese censors, who were apparently uncomfortable with the Russian origins of the film’s chief villain. In the film, hero Tony Stark, played by Robert Downey Jr., battles Ivan Vanko, played by Mickey Rourke, the son of a disgraced Russian physicist with a grievance against the Stark family that dates back to the Cold War. But the words “Russia” and “Russian” are distorted and inaudible every time they are spoken by characters in the film, and don’t appear in the Chinese subtitles.

Why? It’s hard to say exactly, but it seems that China, which often finds itself aligned with Russia against the West on issues from human rights to sanctions against rogue states, doesn’t want its diplomatic ally portrayed negatively. Still a communist country, China is also likely uncomfortable with America’s persistent nostalgia for the Cold War conflict, which was at the heart of the original Iron Man comic books of the 1960s, with Tony Stark as a Howard Hughes-like anti-communist defense contractor.

China only allows 20 foreign films to be screened in its theaters every year, so it could easily have just kept “Iron Man 2″ out entirely. We don’t expect the remake of “Red Dawn,” for instance, to play in Chinese theatres when it opens in November, this time with China standing in for the Soviet Union as the force that invades the American Midwest. But to support its nascent theater industry, Beijing does seek to allow in the major American blockbusters, and like Hollywood, Beijing seems to have recognized that comic-book movies are reliable money makers. So they apparently felt compelled to give “Iron Man 2″ a green light, despite the awkward editing that would have to be done.

The clumsy censorship of Iron Man 2 raises some troubling questions. First off, Chinese censors may be wrong if they think the movie-going public won’t notice. Sure, those audience members who are entirely dependent on subtitles might not catch on to the ruse, but those that speak at least a little English, which includes much of the rising urban middle class, are bound to notice. We’re just guessing, but might such flagrant censorship prompt even more unwelcome reflection on the legacy of the Cold War by ordinary Chinese spectators than the mere appearance of a Russian villain in a film? And second, even if the U.S. successfully persuades China to open up its market to more foreign releases, having Russians as well as Chinese barred from being the bad guys will still significantly restrict the amount of Hollywood fare that gets through.
I am a Beijing girl.

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Post time 2010-6-1 11:51:02 |Display all floors
Originally posted by polaris1120 at 2010-6-1 11:14
There is a generally believed rule when it comes to international relations: If you imagine a country as an enemy, soon it will become one in reality.

The same rule applies to Sino-US relations, which are always complicated.

A movie about the possibility of China invading the US should not cause much concern. What really deserves attention is Americans' lack of understanding of Chinese. ...


Just how did Chinese education in the 1970's, 80's & 90's (I'm not sure of now) in middle schools and high schools depict the USA and other western countries?

As the enemy of the Chinese ...

And now you complain that America holds similar views.

Go figure.

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Post time 2010-6-1 12:36:44 |Display all floors

Reply #3 drwatson's post

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the internet can turn boys into men but can also turn men into dogs if we let dogs do as they wish.

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Post time 2010-6-1 12:56:20 |Display all floors
Originally posted by Desaview at 2010-6-1 12:36
watson in your own words........................


Chinese education in the 1970's, 80's & 90's
now......................................................... America


That is not quite what I said. A fictional movie is not quite the same as the government-sanctioned historical 'truth' handed out to generations of Chinese youth.

The nationalists are going to get in a real tizzy about all this. And will not consider their own background in a country that quite openly manipulates movie content to achieve it's own politically motivated goals.

It all goes back to the main issue at heart: No one is allowed to criticize China.

But at the same time, Chinese are allowed to criticize 'The West'.

I'm not looking forward to the nationalistic backlash this movie will cause here. And, once again, I doubt we will see the government step in to quell this (censor the BBS sites) as they do so often for topics they don't want the populace to view/discuss.

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Post time 2010-6-1 19:07:57 |Display all floors
They are doing another Red Dawn?  The first one was just a propaganda film against the soviets - AND stupid as hell.
I hated that movie.

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Post time 2010-6-1 19:47:22 |Display all floors


Polaris,

White Caucasoid Anglos have the freedom to make a racist propaganda movie and portray the Chinese/Asians/Mongoloid people as yellow perils. We simply can't stop them.

At the same time, we Chinese/Asians/Mongoloids have the freedom to make a counter propaganda movie and depict the White Caucasoid Anglos as uncivilized barbarian white perils. Don't we? They simply can't stop us.

Now, if we decide to remain submissive, docile, slavish, stupid then its a different question altogether. I don't think it is useful to blame them for showing racism just because we can't retaliate with the same degree.

If Hollywood is there to bash Chinese people, there must be a counter movie making industry in China to bash the white Caucasoid Anglos.

If someone slaps you, you better kick him instead of crying and complaining.

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