Author: tianyuanedu

Decline of US and Britain = decline of English? [Copy link] 中文

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-2-23 14:50:59 |Display all floors
Originally posted by greendragon at 2010-2-22 11:55
Reply #5 tianyuanedu's post

well, BRAZIL, MEXICO will be a good place to expand trade with China.

Asian Trade Route is top priority!
and British Club, French-Catholic Club, Spanish realm.....

and of course the biggest power of them all, the American Zone!


ha ha ha

Green DRagon
Game Master.


Brazil is Portuguese-speaking, and Mexico Spanish-speaking. SO if a school wanted to offer Portuguese or Spanish courses instead of English, or if a pupil wanted to be tested in Portuguese or Spanish instead of English to fulfill his second-language requirement for high school graduation, and the PRC had as a goal to expand trade with Brazil and Mexico, would it not make sense to grant that freedom? Why force them into English if they're more interested in Portuguese or Spanish when China wants to expand trade with those countries? Where's the logic in that? In fact, forget trade. Would it not benefit China if more Chinese even just made more friends with Brazilians and Mexicans? Think of the diplomatic benefits to both sides.

Also, since the pupils and teachers would choose their second language, they'd actually like it and the people who spak it and so would use the language to make friends, not enemies, unlike the case with English.
四海之内皆兄弟
-孔子

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-2-23 15:18:14 |Display all floors
Originally posted by tianyuanedu at 2010-2-23 14:40


So why would English be any easier for them? Certainly they stand a higher chance of success in Uygur than English. Consider too that their time is divided between English and Uyghur. They lear ...


I dont think they do not learn uygur because they are forced to learn english.  They do not learn it because they do not care about it.  If it was forced in school, they still might not learn it.  Marxism is also forced in schools andI have not met a single Chinese who is familiar with it tenants.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 8Rank: 8

Post time 2010-2-23 15:25:21 |Display all floors
Originally posted by Exergy at 2010-2-23 12:48 PM


I dont think they do not learn uygur because they are forced to learn english.  They do not learn it because they do not care about it.  If it was forced in school, they still might not learn i ...


Do you think, China follows Marxism..........there is a lot more to pick up with like leninism, stalinism, mao-ism, marxism with Chinese characteristics, the last one seems to be the original marxism followed by China,

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-2-23 15:35:46 |Display all floors
Originally posted by manoj10 at 2010-2-23 15:25


Do you think, China follows Marxism..........there is a lot more to pick up with like leninism, stalinism, mao-ism, marxism with Chinese characteristics, the last one seems to be the original m ...


that doesnt mean they all dont study it in mandatory courses in University.

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-2-24 06:22:36 |Display all floors
Originally posted by seneca at 2010-2-23 15:13
I can't see how Chiense parents or students could make an educated decision as to which second or foreign language they should study. You are advocating too much freedom in this case. Even in the West - I know France pretty well! - students do not really want to study exotic languages (Swahili anyone???); it is their parents that push them. And the availability of courses and relevant trained language instructors, of course. Meanwhile the absolute majority still will take English as their first foreign tongue, with a second foreign language (say, Mandarin) following behind.


I've read a fair bit on the subject from a few countries, and they've all had varying degrees of success. Initially, France had added a long list of languages for schools to choose from, but most schools continued to choose English. Later, France made two additional languages compulsory in the hopes that the schools would choose a variety of languages. Though more successful than the second-language option, it too tended towars the vast majority of schools simply opting for German as the third language. A few years ago, I remember reading an article in which a French politician was complaining about this trend and arguing that France needed to find another strategy to promore more diversity in second-language learning. Somehow I doubt just making three foreign languages compulsory are likely to solve the problem. My guess is, most would then opt for Spanish as their fourth language.

Italy had tried a different approach. Until 1993, it gave schoos a choice between English and a number of Romance languages. Though somewhat successful, it proved not as successful as hoped for and was gradually gravitating ever more to all to English. In 1993, the Ministry of Public Instruction tried a different approach. It added Esperanto to the list, partially in the hopes of enticing students to its ease of learning. Though somewhat successful, it's shown only moderate success.

Hungary has proven most successful. Starting in 2000, any school or organization could present a course plan to the ministry of education for approval based on its pedagogical soundness. Last I cehcked, there were 20 languages already added to the list. Each school is free to teach any language from that list, consideing availability of resources of course; and each pupil can request to be tested in any of these languages either at school or at an approved testing centre, thus not restraining pupils to what is available at their schools.

The Hungarian system has proven quite successful, with many pupils learning a variety of languages. One complaint though was that many lost their language after many years of disuse. Starting in 2008, the ministry now requires a more intensive culture component to make pupils aware of th evenues in which the language can be used, so as to encourage their continued use after their compulsory education. that, of couese, has yet to prove its success, but I'm looking forward to the results.

Unlike in China though, European countries are at elast trying.

If 10 p.c. of the global population are proficient at English then that is a large number that can communicate in writing across borders. We can safely say the number of people that took English as one of their subjects is at least 3 times that percentage. It is easier for them to eventually perfect their English skills because they have a grounding in it, than it is for anyone to study a rare language that serves few native speakers.


Generally speaking, I can agree with you. However, I'd make an exception for bilingual communities. Certainly a Chinese living in Yanbian is likely to prove more successful in Korean than English just because he has the environment to use it in. He's exposed to the language outside of school. I'd also met some Chinese women who wanted to elarn Korean for the Soap Operas. Shallow reason for sure, but hey, who ware we to judge?

Even if the importance of the UK and Usania declines, English is there to stay. There are far more second-language English users than users of any other language. [


I agree to a degree. I don't believe English will loose its international status any time soon, but merely that as other nations rise, their languages will gain in prominence too.

English serves the Chinese best; knowing a second foreign tongue will never be a disadvantage.  


I'll add a caveat. English serves those Chinese who can learn it well. As for the rest, they might benefit more from learning a language that is more within their reach. Not all have the resources necessary to learn their language well.
四海之内皆兄弟
-孔子

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-2-24 06:24:52 |Display all floors
I should point out though that inasmuch as the French policy has proven highly unsuccessful in comparison with the Italian and especially Hunagrian system, it still proves more successful than the Chinese one in that even if schols don't actually exercise the freedom granted to them, at least they have it and certainly at least some schools have exploited it to their advantage, as samll as their numbers may be.
四海之内皆兄弟
-孔子

Use magic tools Report

Rank: 6Rank: 6

Post time 2010-2-24 06:37:02 |Display all floors
Overall though, what I particularly like about the Hungarian model (which, by the way, was based on the British model with some improvements made, abeit still with its own problems still) is its grassroots involvment, which is a neat idea in a democracy. Any organization or person could provide a course plan and as long as it meets pedagogical standards, it can be approved by the Ministry.
四海之内皆兄弟
-孔子

Use magic tools Report

You can't reply post until you log in Log in | register

BACK TO THE TOP
Contact us:Tel: (86)010-84883548, Email: blog@chinadaily.com.cn
Blog announcement:| We reserve the right, and you authorize us, to use content, including words, photos and videos, which you provide to our blog
platform, for non-profit purposes on China Daily media, comprising newspaper, website, iPad and other social media accounts.