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盂蘭節怎么翻译? [Copy link] 中文

Post time 2009-8-8 17:03:09 |Display all floors
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Post time 2009-8-10 08:59:23 |Display all floors
1  The festival of the deliverance of hungry ghosts
2  Menglanjie

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Post time 2009-8-10 09:22:46 |Display all floors
Originally posted by jordan_c_fan at 2009-8-8 17:03
..

By:   Jordan C. Fan,  Prophet of Environment.

盂蘭節怎么翻译?

[co ...


I wonder how many people there are who qualify to be the enemies of you the great all-talented and all-powerful prophet of environment

The power of a man or deity is in inverse proportion to the number of his enemies. The most powerful and humble of all, God, has no enemy.
The bluest of all souls

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Post time 2009-8-10 09:32:44 |Display all floors
盂蘭節
The Pro- "Jordan C. Fan the Prophet of Environment"  Ghosts Striking His Enemies' Day
The bluest of all souls

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Post time 2009-8-10 12:49:36 |Display all floors
Originally posted by chienl at 2009-8-10 09:22


I wonder how many people there are who qualify to be the enemies of you the great all-talented and all-powerful prophet of environment

The power of a man or deity is in inverse proportion ...




As far a I know, God has only one enemy, whom is Satan. But Satan fears God so much that he conceals himself all the time.

[ Last edited by Zsummersun at 2009-8-10 12:50 PM ]

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Post time 2009-8-13 22:03:04 |Display all floors
:victory::victory::victory

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Post time 2009-8-14 10:31:18 |Display all floors

Obon (festival )

Obon (festival )---Day of the Dead
The festival of Obon
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Obon (お盆?) or just Bon (盆?), also referred to as "Day of the Dead,"[1] is a Japanese Buddhist custom to honor the departed (deceased) spirits of one's ancestors. This Buddhist custom has evolved into a family reunion holiday during which people return to ancestral family places and visit and clean their ancestors' graves, and when the spirits of ancestors are supposed to revisit the household altars. Also called the Feast of Lanterns, it has been celebrated in Japan for more than 500 years and traditionally includes a dance, known as Bon-Odori.

The festival of Obon lasts for three days; however its starting date varies within different regions of Japan. When the lunar calendar was changed to the Gregorian calendar at the beginning of the Meiji era, the localities in Japan reacted differently and this resulted in three different times of Obon. "Shichigatsu Bon" (Bon in July) is based on the solar calendar and is celebrated around 15 July in areas such as Tokyo, Yokohama and the Tohoku region. "Hachigatsu Bon" (Bon in August) is based on the solar calendar, is celebrated around the 15th of August and is the most commonly celebrated time. "Kyu Bon" (Old Bon) is celebrated on the 15th day of the seventh month of the lunar calendar, and so differs each year. "Kyu Bon" is celebrated in areas like the northern part of the Kantō region, Chūgoku, Shikoku, and the Southwestern islands. These three days are not listed as public holidays but it is customary that people are given leave.[2]

Obon shares some similarities with the predominantly Mexican observance of el Día de los Muertos, such as customs involving family reunion and care of ancestors' grave sites.

Obon is a shortened form of Ullambana (Japanese: 于蘭盆會 or 盂蘭盆會, urabon'e). It is Sanskrit for "hanging upside down" and implies great suffering[3]. The Japanese believe they should ameliorate the suffering of the "Urabanna".

Bon Odori originates from the story of Mokuren, a disciple of the Buddha, who used his supernatural powers to look upon his deceased mother. He discovered she had fallen into the Realm of Hungry Ghosts and was suffering.[4] Greatly disturbed, he went to the Buddha and asked how he could release his mother from this realm. Buddha instructed him to make offerings to the many Buddhist monks who had just completed their summer retreat, on the fifteenth day of the seventh month. The disciple did this and, thus, saw his mother's release. He also began to see the true nature of her past unselfishness and the many sacrifices that she had made for him. The disciple, happy because of his mother's release and grateful for his mother's kindness, danced with joy. From this dance of joy comes Bon Odori or "Bon Dance", a time in which ancestors and their sacrifices are remembered and appreciated. See also: Ullambana Sutra.

As Obon occurs in the heat of the summer, participants traditionally wear yukata, or light cotton kimonos. Many Obon celebrations include a huge carnival with rides, games, and summer festival food like watermelon.[5]

The festival ends with Toro Nagashi , or the floating of lanterns. Paper lanterns are illuminated and then floated down rivers symbolically signaling the ancestral spirits' return to the world of the dead. This ceremony usually culminates in a fireworks display.

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