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Post time 2011-6-23 23:29:14 |Display all floors

Suicide at US Army HTS: General Martin Dempsey Channels Joker

23.06.2011

By John Stanton

A staff sergeant on duty with the US Army TRADOC Human Terrain System (HTS) committed suicide in April 2011. He left behind his wife and children. Suicide has become a plague within the US Army. Whatever the reasons-despair, stress, relationship issues---it is obviously tragic for family, friends and colleagues. According to the CDC suicide was the 11th leading cause of death in the United States. Latest data show that 34,598 Americans killed themselves in 2010. The preferred way for exiting life was a firearm with 17,352 choosing that method.

The US Army, led by Vice Chief of Staff General Peter Chiarelli, has moved aggressively to identify the underlying causes of suicide among its ranks. There are many resources available in the civil-military universe to assist those contemplating suicide and to educate family and colleagues trying to decode suicidal signals/tendencies.

One notable US Army effort in this area is Army STARRS that provides dozens of suicide prevention resources. It's worth the visit. There is also a very compelling statement on the matter by Chiarelli.


"What I'm trying to do is change the culture of the Army, I'm trying to get soldiers to realize that the wounds you can't see are just as serious as the ones you can."

Go Chiarelli! When done in the US Army, take up that cause (and basic national health care) in civilian life.

US Army HTS PAO, Mr. Greg Mueller, was contacted concerning the suicide, plus other matters that observers say have surfaced recently. These include the results of a Command Climate Survey, ongoing internal investigations, and "disruptive" Human Terrain Teams operating in Afghanistan. Mueller's response was this, "It would be inappropriate for HTS to comment on any of these questions. HTS takes seriously the personal privacy of its team members. Additionally, we impose similar restrictions on the release of information concerning the internal practices of the organization."

Fair enough.

Born Under a Bad Sign

These days the US Army's HTS brings to mind the classic song by Booker Jones and William Bell titled "Born Under a Bad Sign". Cream's version is particularly good. One phrase from the song is, "If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have any luck at all."

The song should be the HTS anthem.

In the short life of this relatively small program (Pentagon relativity at work here), the brand name US Army TRADOC HTS has suffered battlefield killed and wounded, murder/manslaughter, a hostage and spy case, a suicide, sexual harassment (hostile work place), alleged waste-fraud-abuse, a skirmish with academia/anthropologists, plus other matters unreported or barely touched upon in this long series on HTS.

The news for June 2011, according to sources, is that HTS program leaders Colonel's Jose Davis and Sharon Hamilton received substandard results on the latest Command Climate Survey. They say that the reviews were worse than those of former program manager Steve Fondacaro. There are stories of heavy duty partying by HTT's in Afghanistan, pay and grade changes that affect program performance, high turnover rates, etc. "Turmoil" is how sources describe the program.

"We'll maintain a reputation as good stewards of America's resources. We'll remain connected to America. And we'll succeed in all of that because we'll reconnect, engage, empower and hold our leaders accountable." That was General Martin Dempsey, former CG of US Army TRADOC (December 2008 to April 2011), speaking at his Assumption of Responsibility Ceremony (for CSA) on April 11, 2011. Now he is on his way to the Chair of the JCS.

Dempsey recently remarked that US Army leaders should, "Encourage curiosity and don't be afraid to introduce chaos once in a while."

Perhaps Dempsey is a fan of Heath Ledger's Joker segment on "Chaos" in the movie The Dark Knight.

"Introduce a little anarchy. Upset the established order, and everything becomes chaos. I'm an agent of chaos. Oh, and you know the thing about chaos? It's fair."
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Post time 2011-6-27 22:32:52 |Display all floors

US soldiers tested for having depleted uranium in their bodies

Fri Jun 24, 2011 11:55AM


A member of the anti-Iraq war group, Military Families Speak Out, says U.S. soldiers are being tested for having depleted uranium in their bodies.

Pat Alviso, the mother of a U.S. soldier who has served both in Iraq and Afghanistan, told Press TV's U.S. Desk on Thursday that the depleted uranium that is being used in Iraq and Afghanistan has horrible side-effects and U.S. soldiers are affected by it.

Alviso says the U.S. government has finally recognized that veterans are not getting the care and benefits that they need. She believes some veterans find it difficult to get treatment because they are labeled with having "pre-existing conditions" and that is something which is difficult to measure.

Alviso told the U.S. Desk that a lot of the military soldiers were not too eager to get involved with Veterans Affairs because of all the paperwork that was involved. She added that this could be one reason why the U.S. has "a high percentage of veterans who are homeless."

Alviso also warned of the high number of U.S. soldiers having been diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) because of multiple deployments. She stressed that "this is causing tremendous amount of mental health issues."

Many members of the Military Families Speak Out organization currently have loved ones serving in Iraq -- some for third, fourth or fifth deployments; and for most of the rest, their loved ones are eligible for deployment or redeployment to Iraq.
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Post time 2011-7-7 03:51:45 |Display all floors

Mental health status of US troops

Quick Facts: Mental health status of US troops
Sun Mar 6, 2011 7:10PM


Repeated deployments of American soldiers to Iraq and Afghanistan have taken their toll not only on the troops themselves but also their families, according to the Department of Defense.

Information disclosed by the Pentagon to the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee revealed that visits by family members of active-duty military personnel to therapists have increased at a compound annual growth rate of 15% over the past 10 years. AllGov

The wounds of war can go far beyond what meets the eye. From mental health issues to pain and illness that persist long after they have left the battlefield, U.S. soldiers face a multitude of health troubles either unique to their service or more frequent among them than the general population. AllGov

Highlights
According to an Army survey conducted in July 2009, soldiers in combat units said deployment had a direct effect on family life -- 16.5 percent faced divorce or separation. Nextgov

Just over half of all veterans' post-deployment health visits address lingering pain in their backs, necks, knees or shoulders said Dr. Stephen Hunt, national director of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Post Deployment Integrative Care Initiative. Myhealthnewsdaily

Of the 289,328 veterans who entered VA care from 2002 to 2008, nearly 37% had mental health problems, including post traumatic stress disorder (about 22%) and depression (roughly 17%). Guardian

A 2010 June study in the journal Archives of General Psychiatry found that one in 10 Iraq war vets develop serious mental problems, including violent behavior, depression and alcohol abuse. Myhealthnewsdaily

In 2010, more than 134,000 people made calls to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Of those callers, 61 percent identified themselves as veterans. News.medill

Figures released by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in 2010 show a dramatic increase in suicide among veterans aged 18 to 29 years old, due in large part to multiple deployments and the overall stress of combat. Truth-out

Soldiers' lives disrupted
According to an Army survey conducted in July 2009, soldiers in combat units said deployment had a direct effect on family life -- 16.5 percent faced divorce or separation. Nextgov

The Army found that the possibility of divorce had steadily increased since 2003, when the service began conducting formal mental health assessments of troops stationed in Afghanistan and Iraq. Nextgov

Alan Peterson, a retired Air Force psychologist who is now a professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, said the increase in mental health consultations that military family members seek reflects the cumulative effects of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Nextgov

Common health conditions confronting soldiers
"Folks returning from combat have a constellation of health concerns, including physical issues, psychological issues and psychosocial issues concerning things like work and family," said Dr. Stephen Hunt, national director of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Post Deployment Integrative Care Initiative. Myhealthnewsdaily

Some of the most common physical complaints of returning soldiers cannot be classified into a single disorder, said Dr. Stephen Hunt, national director of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Post Deployment Integrative Care Initiative. They include nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, pain and cognitive disturbances such as memory and concentration problems. Myhealthnewsdaily

Musculoskeletal injuries and pain
Just over half of all veterans' post-deployment health visits address lingering pain in their backs, necks, knees or shoulders, said Dr. Stephen Hunt, national director of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Post Deployment Integrative Care Initiative. Myhealthnewsdaily

According to an August study in the Journal of Pain, about 100,000 veterans of the Persian Gulf War nearly 20 years ago have reported chronic muscle pain. Myhealthnewsdaily

Mental health issues
Of the 289,328 veterans who entered VA care from 2002 to 2008, nearly 37% had mental health problems, including post traumatic stress disorder (about 22%) and depression (roughly 17%). Guardian

300,000 of the U.S. military veterans coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, according to a recent study. Abclocal.go.com

A June 2010 study in the journal Archives of General Psychiatry found that one in 10 Iraq war vets develop serious mental problems, including violent behavior, depression and alcohol abuse. Myhealthnewsdaily

The study found that PTSD or depression seriously impaired daily functioning in 8.5 percent to 14 percent of these vets. Myhealthnewsdaily

Researchers from Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., reported in 2010 that 54 percent of veterans with PTSD also had sleep apnea, compared with 20 percent of PTSD patients in the general population. Myhealthnewsdaily

PTSD in vets is also associated with a greater risk of developing dementia, according to a June 2010 study in Archives of General Psychiatry. Myhealthnewsdaily

Chemical exposure
Research by the American Heart Association found that exposure to nerve agents such as sarin - which can trigger convulsions and death on the battlefield- may cause long-term heart damage in Persian Gulf War veterans. Myhealthnewsdaily

Noise and vibration exposure
Hearing loss and impairment - including persistent ringing and buzzing in the ears - are common effects of harmful noise from gunfire, heavy weapons, noisy engine rooms and aircraft. Myhealthnewsdaily

Additionally, vets who regularly worked with machinery can suffer vibration exposure, which can prompt irreversible lower back pain or numbness and pain in the hands and fingers, according to the VA. Myhealthnewsdaily

Traumatic brain injury (TBI)
TBI, often brought on by a blow or jolt to the head, disrupts brain function and has been called the signature wound of the fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to the National Academy of Sciences. Myhealthnewsdaily

Blast exposures and other combat-related activities put service members at greater risk for sustaining a TBI compared to their civilian counterparts, according to the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center. Myhealthnewsdaily

"Between 70 and 80 percent of combat deaths are from blast-related exposure," said Dr. Stephen Hunt, national director of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Post Deployment Integrative Care Initiative. Hunt added, "and of survivors, 20 percent report that they may have had an event that resulted in a mild concussion. Whether there will be any long-term effects is difficult to ascertain." Myhealthnewsdaily

Suicide rate alarming among US soldiers
New statistics from the VA show that veterans make up 20 percent of the 30,000 suicides in the United States each year. Abclocal

An average of 18 veterans commit suicide every day and five of those are already getting treatment at the VA. Abclocal

In 2010, more than 134,000 people made calls to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Of those callers, 61 percent identified themselves as veterans. News.medill

Figures released by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in 2010 show a dramatic increase in suicide among veterans aged 18 to 29 years old, due in large part to multiple deployments and the overall stress of combat. Truth-out

Between 2005 and 2007, the VA said it saw a 26 percent increase in suicides, mostly among veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Truth-out

Fort Hood overwhelmed by mental health problems of soldiers
In 2010, Fort Hood, the U.S.'s largest Army post measured the toll of war in the more than 10,000 mental health evaluations, referrals or therapy sessions held every month. USA Today

About every fourth soldier in Fort Hood, where 48,000 troops and their families are based, had been in counseling during the past year, according to the service's medical statistics. USA Today

Statistics provided to USA TODAY by Fort Hood commanders show the explosion of mental health issues:

Fort Hood counselors met with more than 4,000 mental health patients a month. USA Today

In 2009, 2,445 soldiers were diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), up from 310 in 2004. USA Today

Every month, an average of 585 soldiers were sent to nearby private clinics contracted through the Pentagon's TRICARE health system because Army counselors could not handle more patients. That is up from 15 per month in 2004. USA Today
Hundreds more saw therapists "off the network" because they wanted their psychological problems kept secret from the Army. A free clinic in Killeen offering total discretion treated 2,000 soldiers or family members in 2010, many of them officers. USA Today

In 2009, 6,000 soldiers were on anti-depressant medications and an additional 1,400 received anti-psychotic drugs. USA Today
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Post time 2011-7-7 06:47:07 |Display all floors

Rothschilds

The Rothschilds and the other Anglo Zionist elites that profit from these cowardly turkey shoots don't care if
some sheeple get hurt.

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Post time 2011-7-7 07:07:43 |Display all floors

Lol@Rly?

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Post time 2011-7-7 07:27:12 |Display all floors
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