Author: changabula

What Can China Learn From Her History? [Copy link] 中文

Post time 2007-9-5 15:19:18 |Display all floors
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Post time 2007-9-5 22:45:23 |Display all floors
Originally posted by schreiber at 2007-9-5 15:19
You should read it carefully, Chang, and one day you might be knowledgeable enough to actually hold a candle to me when I am having an off day and a migraine.

Please show use where China had opi ...



Schreiber,


I believe this depends a bit in which country you went at school. I was taught that Opium was forced upon China in order to destroy or handicap the population. I'm not arguing but it is certainly a matter of where you come from and who wrote the books. Paper is very patient........

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Post time 2007-9-6 20:27:30 |Display all floors
Originally posted by satsu_jin at 2007-9-5 22:45
Schreiber,

I believe this depends a bit in which country you went at school. I was taught that Opium was forced upon China in order to destroy or handicap the population. I'm not arguing ...


Yes,

By the same perspective as yours, Schreiber insisted opium trade is not bad for China, same logic as Bush's insisting that invading Iraq and toppling Saddam's as 'liberating' Iraqis.

The difference is it's us who suffered from opium trade, which won't be felt by the agressor. It's also the Iraqi that suffers from the invasion, when the agressor still arrogantly think they are saving Iraq.

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Post time 2007-9-6 22:25:42 |Display all floors
"I was taught that Opium was forced upon China in order to destroy or handicap the population."

Surely the main motivation in selling opium to the Chinese was the same motivation for selling anything... to make money?  It would be interesting to see evidence that plans existed to destroy the population, but I doubt it exists.  This idea of 'forcing' opium on China also needs to be analysed in terms of what you mean by 'China'.  The Qing state banned it, yes, but after that ban opium was transported into China from foreign ships by Chinese traders, and sold to Chinese customers.  To describe this as 'forcing' seems far too simplistic to me.

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Post time 2007-9-6 22:27:55 |Display all floors
Originally posted by northwest at 2007-9-6 20:27


Yes,

By the same perspective as yours, Schreiber insisted opium trade is not bad for China, same logic as Bush's insisting that invading Iraq and toppling Saddam's as 'liberating' Iraqis.

...


Very true indeed, northwest.

But sometimes I wonder if their denial of their holocausts and their crimes against humanity that they manage to whitewash and rewrite isn't more hurtful to the victims.

Unfortunately, when they were committing these crimes there was not that much news people around like it is now. Isn't amazing how they still manage to prevent these atrocities from coming to light even in Iraq? If it wasn't for the stupidity of their soldiers taking pictures and making movies of what they were doing we would never know.

Their newspapers are deadly SILENT on the subject!
I am Chinese and Proud of it!

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Post time 2007-9-7 00:37:54 |Display all floors
"I was taught that Opium was forced upon China in order to destroy or handicap the population"

Seems to me that the reason Europeans sold opium in China was the same reason anyone sells anything- to make money.

The idea that opium was 'forced' on China needs analysing.. yes, the Qing government banned it, but as I recall sales continued because Chinese traders took the opium from foreign ships inland- because there was still great demand for it.

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Post time 2007-9-7 06:25:25 |Display all floors
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