Author: middlekingdo

The Opium Wars [Copy link] 中文

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Post time 2007-5-18 17:13:18 |Display all floors
Originally posted by whampoa at 15-5-2007 09:44 PM
Yes, for people like him we call them SNAKE (UNTRUSTWORTHY) who flip-flop, twist and turn and will NEVER give you a direct answer.  In any case, if you read all his posts you will see he only disrupts, insults, brow-beats forumites and tries to smear their reputation with lies, personal attacks and insults on where they live and their private lives.


The irony of the rubbish that you write is beyond belief.

You have been warned many times to stop your lies - however I have begun to understand that you have some kind of disorder which requires you to stalk around during the night posting here.

We could have a whole thread on your lies, personal attacks, question-dodging and hypocrisy if you so wish ... but we have been there before, complete with evidence.
Take me down to the paradise city, where the grass is green and the girls are pretty

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Post time 2007-5-18 22:39:20 |Display all floors
[As for the rationalization that the failure of China to treat foreign countries as "equals" entitled England to wage war on China in order to gain an "equal status", it is none bu a gangster's logic.  a logic of this kind denied a sovereign nation the right to determine its own foreign policy and its own trade system and, in the meantime entitled a foreign power, in the name of "equality" to resort to the use of force to gain what it wsihed to gain from its victim.

This gangster's logic was typical of England's bourgeois class of the 19th century who strove for world hegemony and succeeded.

Many English and American historians have stated that even if Lin Zexu had not proceeded with the banning of the opium traffic, a Sino-British war would occur nevertheless, sooner or later.  They are right, of course, since there were more important reasons than opium smuggling for England's bourgeois class to start a war against China.

Then there were two groups of British people in favour of an aggressive war against China.

The opium smugglers represented the first group, including William Jardine and William Matheson, both of whom had been expelled from China by Lin Zexu on account of their opium smuggling activities.  

These two hooligans not only became dirty rich from their opium smuggling activities along China's coast, but also upon their return to England, became members
of Parliament.  Matheson was even knighted.
  Sounds familiar, doesn't this? (last edited) ?


.....

[ Last edited by immouse at 2007-5-19 09:58 AM ]

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Post time 2007-5-19 09:51:45 |Display all floors
The immediate, direct cause of the Opium War was Britain's desire to protect the dirty, immoral opium traffic.  It tried to compel China, by the force of arms, to give up all of its self-protective measures so that Chinba would become a vast market for British goods.

No matter how one looks at it, the Opium War was an unjust war of aggression launched by Great Britain against China.

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Post time 2007-5-19 09:55:51 |Display all floors
The Opium War brought many Chinese their first contact with Western aggressors.

At first they had no idea of the purpose of these armed men, of what the war was all about; only slowly and gradually did they recognise these aggressors' true face by first-hand experience.  

The moment they entered a coastal area, town, or city, these aggressors from the West systematically burned, killed, pillaged, and raped, showing their true character as ruthless pirates.





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Post time 2007-5-21 19:48:20 |Display all floors
Originally posted by immouse at 19-5-2007 01:51 AM
The immediate, direct cause of the Opium War was Britain's desire to protect the dirty, immoral opium traffic.  


So nothing to do with the events reported elsewhere? This is your opinion? Or are you quoting from a source which you can share so others can read more?
Take me down to the paradise city, where the grass is green and the girls are pretty

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Post time 2007-5-22 01:09:51 |Display all floors
Do you see?

Indeed, Bulldog, being told of the truth now, would you apologise for all those crimes committed by your forefathers?



whampao

Never, it is un-British to grovel to appease another

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Post time 2007-5-22 05:31:49 |Display all floors
The Opium War, also called the Anglo-Chinese War, was the most humiliating defeat China ever suffered. In European history, it is perhaps the most sordid, base, and vicious event in European history, possibly, just possibly, overshadowed by the excesses of the Third Reich in the twentieth century.


   By the 1830's, the English had become the major drug-trafficking criminal organization in the world; very few drug cartels of the twentieth century can even touch the England of the early nineteenth century in sheer size of criminality. Growing opium in India, the East India Company shipped tons of opium into Canton which it traded for Chinese manufactured goods and for tea.


  This trade had produced, quite literally, a country filled with drug addicts, as opium parlors proliferated all throughout China in the early part of the nineteenth century. This trafficing, it should be stressed, was a criminal activity after 1836, but the British traders generously bribed Canton officials in order to keep the opium traffic flowing.


The effects on Chinese society were devestating. In fact, there are few periods in Chinese history that approach the early nineteenth century in terms of pure human misery and tragedy. In an effort to stem the tragedy, the imperial government made opium illegal in 1836 and began to aggressively close down the opium dens.

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